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What Would It Take for YOU to buy a diesel car?

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Comments

  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,983
    Hard to believe I know, but lots of people want to be able to walk or bike around to work and shopping (and want to be able to breathe while doing so).

    The techies want to dial up a self-driving car for the "heavy" trips to Whole Foods. And yeah, the cab companies are already fighting such car share schemes.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,917
    edited December 2013
    And another thing, thanks to the H1B movement, a lot of code monkeys who move to the first world are used to denser living arrangements, and aren't tempted by that pile of pressboard 'n tyvek located 20 miles from anywhere. Maybe it will finally put enough pressure on the ridiculous public sector "engineer" group who is responsible for so much fuel consumption via their defective traffic controls and poor pedestrian facilities, to actually do something.

    Maybe once the new breed become overpaid middle aged business pros (as they laughably call themselves), things might evolve. As it is, in this tech area, I still see too many of the ruling generation in their Tesla or Lexus hybrid, phone to their ear as they can't figure out bluetooth, headed to their energy guzzling mcmansion or oversized condo. However ,when it comes down to it, the vast majority of people, even young people, are not techies.

    The Amazon drone idea is brilliant PR, but unworkable.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    edited December 2013
    Fin, what are you trying to say? That people would rather live smashed together like sardines in a can. I say each should have an acre to stretch and be able to play their music without encrouching on other ears. Get a nice high mileage diesel for the drive into the city to work.

    Or even better companies like Apple, Google and Yahoo should build huge complexes with living quarters out away from the cities. Where everyone can live and work and eat together. Kind of like I did in the oil field for 25 years.

    Most people were forced out of the cities to the burbs by higher prices and urban blight. I see gentrification as the pendulum swinging back to clean up the cities. Sadly the poor that had taken up living in the run down cities are in many cases being forced out by HIGH PRICES.

    A guy I worked with at Pac Bell in the 1960s was offered a job in San Francisco. He went up to look for a home. He said every ten miles out the price dropped $10k. He bought 20 miles North. Somewhere near San Rafael. He probably retired and made a fortune on the place years ago.

    PS
    In the late 1960s you could buy a dandy place for $25k.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,983
    He probably died young stressing about his commute. :P

    " Urban areas — defined as densely developed residential, commercial and other nonresidential areas -- now account for 80.7 percent of the U.S. population, up from 79.0 percent in 2000. Although the rural population -- the population in any areas outside of those classified as “urban” — grew by a modest amount from 2000 to 2010, it continued to decline as a percentage of the national population."

    Growth in Urban Population Outpaces Rest of Nation, Census Bureau Reports (census.gov)
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    He was a poor telephone guy that could no way afford to live in SF. Even in the 1960s it was high rent. Gas was cheap and 20 miles not much of a commute. I commuted 20 miles during the 1960s from East County to downtown San Diego. I had an old beatup Studebaker that could eke out 20 MPG. Seems like gas was maybe 25 cents a gallon and I was making about $1.75 per hour. Just above minimum wage. Now MW barely buys two gallons of gas. Great part is 1962 there was very little traffic on the freeway down through Mission Valley.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,490
    edited December 2013
    Your post is a very small vignette of a very long and steady effort to gut rural to suburban areas.

    One small example used to be (6.8 M in 1935) millions of small farms/farmers. I think today we are lucky to have 2.2 million and app 3.13 M actual people.

    ..."There are over 313,000,000 people living in the United States. Of that population, less than 1% claim farming as an occupation (and about 2% actually live on farms). In 2007, only 45% of farmers claimed farming as their principal occupation and a similar number of farmers claiming some other principal occupation. The number of farms in the U.S. stands at about 2.2 million.

    What is a farm?

    For the purposes of the U.S. Census, a farm is any establishment which produced and sold, or normally would have produced and sold, $1,000 or more of agricultural products during the year. (Government subsidies are included in sales.) By that definition, there are just over 2.2 million farms in the United States.

    Farm production expenses average $109,359 per year per farm. Clearly, many farms that meet the U.S. Census' definition would not produce sufficient income to meet farm family living expenses. In fact, fewer than 1 in 4 of the farms in this country produce gross revenues in excess of $50,000."...

    http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/ag101/demographics.html

    It reminds me of that joke: how to make a small fortune (in farming). Start with a LARGE fortune. So if a lot of rich people want to do that, hey it truly is not for me to judge them. Besides we might miss some good ones ! :)

    The ironic truth of that is Napa, Sonoma, Santa Barbara, Central Valley, etc =., grapes are the basis for some of the finest wines in the world. Whether we NEED these fine wines (or even normal ones) is/are a whole different question/s of which environmentalist's normally ignore.
  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 3,207
    "A guy I worked with at Pac Bell . . ."

    Dilbert was developed by a Pac Bell refugee, as I recall (Scott Adams). For several months in the early '80s I thought he worked where I did at AiResearch. He nailed it then and does to this day.

    Yeah, I remember the days when it was possible to buy a place in So Cal for 30 or 40K, even up in the Pacific Palisades.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,983
    Yep, this small farmer is moving to Chicago, Denver or Atlanta. (realtytoday.com)

    No love for the lung cancer link eh?

    Ok, on the bright side, there may be some relief in diesel prices soon. (Bloomberg).
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    So maybe RUG will go up to meet Diesel coming down. You know it makes sense. ;-)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,917
    edited December 2013
    Yes, actually. Many young people are comfortable in multi-unit dwellings, as it's what they have known for a long time, what they can afford, and it is the way people live in most world class cities. Not everywhere is like Tejas where you can get an awesome house for $100/sq ft nor is like the olden days where normal working people could responsibly finance a livable house on an average salary.

    I live in the urban core of a boomburb, almost never hear music, my neighbors are clean, quiet, and employed, the streets are clean and safe (esp by American standards), I can walk to almost anything I need... the standard of living here is higher than many acre tract developments in this country. I choose not to have a long commute, but I still drive a diesel - road trips :)
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,490
    edited December 2013
    It would sound like a wonderful time to be a landlord where you are. Let's just hope (for your sake) the city where you are does not follow the Detroit model of running municipalities.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    edited December 2013
    Just looking at the 2014 Touareg TDI on Edmunds. If I was buying today it would still be the TDI Lux. However the TMV is about $6,000 higher. The selection is far less, only 4 in all of Southern CA. They have dropped the free service down to 24 months or 24k miles. They are not offering $0 down or 0% financing. I have never owned a vehicle I like as much as this one. 7500 miles averaging 26.6 MPG, what's not to like?? It does not collect dust in the garage like the Sequoia did. Busy planning our next cross country route. Yellowstone Park is on the list. Probably late summer so we can take the back roads less traveled through Cody, Sheridan etc.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,490
    edited December 2013
    Yee haw !! I am glad to hear both in before and 20/20 hind sight, that you are happy with the (13) VW Touareg TDI.

    I fear that VW raised the price of (14 VW T TDI) admission $ 6 k because guys like me were running off at the mouth. (so to speak, actually blogging?) :) More seriously, I think a fair number of (serious buyers) folks have caught on to the fact the underpinning for the hugely popular Porsche Cayenne, which can cost MORE than double are in fact VW Touareg's and diesels' specifically, TDI's.

    Tha price premium and the others points are HUGE corrections ! Still, I swallow a bit hard saying this, the VW T TDI is probably STILL worth the price of admission.

    The following is on point for you and off point for diesel. While I liked the poorly rated oem GY LS2 tires (one reason 14,000 miles per 1/32nd wear) , I am having good luck with and am enthused about the better rated (actually #1 on the current bitt parade ) Continental CC LX20's W/ EPT. It also seems to appear the issue I raised with worse mpg between tires could have been a straw man, really due to newness and other variables and changing conditions. They also seem to steer much more precisely, which may take a tad getting used to.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,917
    edited December 2013
    Maybe not. There's a huge amount of recent construction, so it is as much a renters market as it is a landlord's. If one doesn't like a rent increase, they will find something else. It's not a cheap place, but there's some semblance of balance. A funny thing happened several years ago - rents spiked, then some simply moved out of the neighborhood, and rents then collapsed (mine went down to levels less than 5 years prior). Developers (few buildings here are privately owned) are often poor at managing supply. It happens with condo markets too.

    This city is one of the most affluent in the region and shows no signs of slowing down. Hot industries and scarce land helps for a lot, too. The city leadership itself is of course as inefficient as most of the public sector, but relatively speaking, it is one of the better places to live - and population growth supports that.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,490
    edited December 2013
    I would agree, once you describe both the area and landscape. Almost all RE is LOCAL, LOCAL, LOCAL.

    So for example, rents in SF, CA (even in the crash) continued to spike. Indeed it is still spiking.

    Again not to beat a dead horse, contrast that with.... Detroit. Why pay rent when one can literally SQUAT :) There is probably now a political action group now: Squatter's RIGHTS !!! :)

    More seriously, this might be the bottoming of an old decaying 50 year ending cycle; coming up on a NEW 25/35 year cycle (aka the iconic AMERICAN literally LAND of OPPORTUNITY) for that area, once unions et al, figure out that thug behavior is old in the tooth and not in everyone's, to their best interests. One could probably pick up a sq block with a negotiated deal to get the block on some kind of minimal tax roll.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,490
    edited December 2013
    http://www.digitaltrends.com/car-reviews/2014-volkswagen-touareg-tdi-sport-revie- - - - - - w/#/20

    I found this, wandering around ! The reviewer is a bit clueless, as he fails to make any number of comparisons, which then slants his conclusions. Here are two examples:

    1. gasser gasser/hybrid vs TDI Touareg's (mpg's since this seems to be high on his priority lists)

    2. how many vehicles @ sub or @ 5k #'s rate a EPA of 20/29 mpg?

    3. by a few of his comments it is clear he didn't know how to optimize the diesel differences, hence "acceptable fuel mileage".

    4. Now how many folks would make a vehicle decision based on the CON that a cubby interrupts design lines?
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    The writer is a bit of a dork alright. Thinking a Range Rover or Subaru are in the same class off road as a Touareg. Don't he know they have won the Dakar over all every time they entered? I keep my reading glasses and sun glasses in that handy little cubby.

    I also like the Goodyear LS2 tires. It depends on how well they hold up. I am not a big Goodyear fan. Michelin does not offer a lot in that size. Keep us posted on your Continentals.
  • cskicski West Springfield, VAPosts: 1,054
    So.....that's why you guys talk about the Touareg so much! It's Porsche underpinnings. Well, how much $ would I be looking at to drive a 2013 Diesel Touareg (nicely equipped...not stupidly equipped. I don't need driver nannies).

    It is snowing here in NOVA, and I miss my Grand Cherokee today!
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    If you liked your Grand Cherokee I would go test drive the new diesel model. I don't think there are many 2013 Touareg TDIs floating around these days. The Sport model is the lowest priced and has the least content. I would think if you find one it would be in the $45k range.
  • cskicski West Springfield, VAPosts: 1,054
    I liked Goodyear Wrangler's on my Grand Cherokee Laredo V8. I had the optional 245/70/16, and let me tell you....I loved the way she "hooked up" in rain/snow. Great driving truck. I Miss the V8 sound and torque. I Don't miss the F/E, or the maintenance. Again, it is snowing and sleeting here so I have SUV on the brain.

    One thing I noticed today. The OEM mud guards on my car are a hindrance in the snow. I had to clear it all out with a broomstick after a 15 min drive, and it must have added 20 pounds of weight per wheel. Then I had to clear it again on the way back.
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