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Valve/engine woes. Should I call it a day?

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Comments

  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    thanx .. I'll pass it that on ... they seem to have gotten the engine to start, it just doesn't idle ... they are leaning to messin' with the onboard computer which scares me a bit ... :/
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    Yeah, I agree with AJ. Tell them to use the long block from the '98 only.... all the bolt-ons, sensors, etc., from the '99 should go back on it!
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    well the plot thickens ... seems the intake from my '99 is too long for 98 block, which is why they have connection issues ... could that be true or are these guys yankin' my chain ...

    starting to panic! OY
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    You can remove the intake silencer. I did, and it's not necessary. Anything before the air filter is optional.
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    I guess what I meant was wide then ... from head to head the '99 intake seems longer then the '98 ... is that what xwesx meant by "long block"?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I don't know about differences with the block, sorry.

    The intake is plastic - careful use of a heat gun can bend it a bit.
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    OY, I thought it was aluminum, felt like it .. I don't think I trust these guys with a heat gun ... maybe I'll see if junkyard will take twincam back in exchange for for a SOHC if they got one
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    I think you two are speaking of different parts of the intake! The intake manifold is aluminum, and that is what tbird69 is talking about. The pre-manifold piping (between the manifold and the air filter) is plastic.

    But, I am concerned about there being a difference in the sizes of the blocks! I am really surprised to hear that. Are both of these engines DOHC (dual overhead cams)? I thought that it was mentioned earlier that they are, but I am not aware of any block or head changes that would result in a differently sized manifold. Maybe one of these engines is a 2.2L rather than a 2.5. I think the Impreza still had 2.2L available in '98... isn't that right?

    By long block, I meant the block and heads... no manifolds, accessories, sensors, etc.
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    Yes ...I meant the intake manifold ... and as I look back on my original post I notice I wasn't clear about the fact that I had blown a SOHC engine EJ253AXZVB and had bought a twin cam which is a DOHC right? because my mechanic was unfamiliar ( I know find) with the nuances of Subaru ... (only number I have on the DOHC is from junkyard receipt and that says '98 Forester EJ25 Engine) ....

    so am I in deep doo doo with this?
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    Well, yes and no. The timing is, I think, quite a bit different on the two engines. And, as you found out, the accessories and parts are not entirely compatible. I think, though, that in order to fix the idling problem you will have to re-tune the engine control unit (ECU) or replace it with the '98 ECU. Even then, unless all the rest of the wiring in the car is the same, you may end up with other problems. It can be done.... I know a fella here who replaced his '97 Impreza L coupe's original engine with that of a 2006 WRX. But, it was a massive operation - he essentially stripped the entire car down and completely re-wired and otherwise re-built it with the WRX internals. But, for a stock WRX, it is the fastest one out there!

    Good luck; I am not sure how deep the "doo" goes, but you will not find out without digging....

    Who chose the engine; you or the shop?
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    Who chose the engine? .. well there in lies the misunderstanding ... my mechanic couldn't find an engine so I called around .. junkyard said we got twin cam and we got single cam ... I didn't know which so I asked mechanic what I had , he said single but that he would go do a compression check on engine and check it out ... nice guy actually ... the Forester the engine was in looked exactly the same as mine .. engine was good, he said go for it ... but it was the DOHC ... which were in Foresters in '99 ...

    His side is that I picked out the engine and he went to check it out as a favor and that I didn't do my homework .... I'm trying to keep this from becoming a finger pointing contest ... the junkyard has a very good reputation so I'm hoping they will be simpathetic .. the reality is the engine doesn't fit ... am I in Fantasyland thinking they will take it back?
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    Well, if they have SOHC engines, maybe they will take the DOHC back in exchange for a SOHC (if nothing else).
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    The good news is they have a SOHC engine and are willing to do the exchange!!! I'm going to cross reference the engine number first to make sure it will work ... wikipedia has a site I found where I can decode the serial numbers ... the yard I'm working with is called "Just [non-permissible content removed]" ... I had heard they were good to deal with , now I know it;'s true .. Craig, the owner has been great to work with ... and my shop guy and I have learned alot about Subaru in the last 2 weeks ....

    Thank you guys for all your help!!! I'll let you know how it works out

    Be Well .. Peace
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    Sounds great! Best of luck to you both....
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    Thanx ... my concern now is that the SOHC engine is from a 2001 Impreza ... which I looked up online ... it's Intake volume is regulated by the use of a MAP sensor, unlike the EJ253 (which I had) which uses a MAF sensor. If I understand your previous post, as long as I get a SOHC "long block" use my intake manifold I should be golden ... does the sensor become a mute point then?

    It ain't over yet ....
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    If the mechanical portions of the engine are identical (crankshaft/pistons, camshaft, etc) and the ports match up to the parts you have, if you install all of your own components on the engine block including sensors, you should have no problems as a result of sensor/computer incompatibility. If something is different, your woes are likely to continue.

    If the replacement engine is not overhauled, be sure to check for head gasket problems before you install it! No reason to move from one headache to another.... or tear the engine out of the car yet again!
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    Thanx .. I'll keep ya posted ... Peace,
    Tbird
  • tbird69tbird69 Posts: 11
    so here's the new twist ... was ably to switch engines at junkyard... it's installed ... now we get the AT Oil Temp light flashing and check engine light on .. plus tranny is stuck in one gear ... the code is 1705 , at least that's what they told me ....2 other points ....

    mechanic didn't use my intake manifold, the one on the junkyard engine connected all but on sensor on intake ... mmmmm a clue perhaps .... I was also wondering if that AT oil screen needed to be changed .... years ago I remember that being a simple fix when you thought you had major problems ... any thoughts!!!
    Thanx!! been 5 weeks without car now .. good thing I use a bicycle alot :)
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,267
    Why did he not use your intake? That could very well be the source of problem, at least on the P1705 code.

    Here is information on that, located at this website.

    P1705 excessively high or low voltage input from TPS sensor

    When testing a tps sensor code like this P1705 code, check the signal wire voltage for any signs of glitch. This can be done manually without running the engine. With key on engine off, monitor the signal wire voltage from idle (close throttle) and up to high idle (WOT or wide open throttle position) by moving the throttle linkage. The transistion from idle to high idle should be reflected in the voltage readings like a gradually increasing pattern. If there is a sudden change or a glitch, replace the TPS sensor. Please note also that a regular tps sensor usually has 3 wires: a voltage reference wire, a signal wire and a ground wire. Except the signal wires, the other 2 wires should have steady voltage readings regardless of the throttle linkage position.

    For advance testing, garages can usually monitor the voltage of the TPS signal wire while the engine is running. Using a special scanner, the voltage can be watched while cruising in order to see if the value of the signal wire voltage will change. This is particularly important if the code P1705 only appears intermittently. For precaution, check the integrity of the signal wires from the TPS sensor plug-in up to 12 inches away. To do this, splice the wiring harness and check if there is any short (bump) in the signal wire which could be rubbing metal before this code came on.


    With regard to the AT Oil Temp light and non-shifting, I wonder if there is a connector not properly seated on the transmission - it sounds to me like the engine control module and transmission control module are not talking! They have to talk if you want the tranny to shift out of 1st. By default, it will work in P, R, N, and 1 without input from the engine control module, but that unit tells it when/if to up or down shift through the other forward gears.
  • I am having this same problem on a brand new 2011 subaru forester. The check engine came on the night I drove it off the lot and has come on 6 times in the 3 weeks that I've had it. It is engine misfire trouble codes P0302 and P0304. They don't know how to fix it. I sent in my lemon law letter and I am trying to get them to replace the car with another one.
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