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Are you happy you didn't sell your SUV?

steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,296
edited April 22 in General
Last summer when gas was $4 a gallon in many areas, people were going to extremes to park their SUVs and get into fuel efficient cars.

If you sold or parked your SUV because of high gas prices, so you now regret it, since gas is hovering around $2?

Moderator
Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

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Comments

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Those that have record snowfall this year and parked their SUV are in luck. Those that traded into an econobox with those little teenie tires are probably wishing they had not screwed up. The knee jerk reaction to vehicle purchasing in this country is just crazy.

    When this was proposed in the $4 gas thread. I thought the title should read "Do you feel like a sardine or just stupid for trading in your SUV on an econobox"?
  • boaz47boaz47 Posts: 2,750
    I didn't drive it as much after the first of the year in 2008 but I wasn't about to cave in and get rid of it. I sold the Focus and paid it off and dusted off the old Pontiac 4 banger for driving around town and to the mall. Let the 4 banger get the door dings. But when the weather is bad, or if I have to go to home depot, or take friends out to dinner the SUV is waiting there for use. When gas dropped under $1.80 a gallon I drove it more just because I could. Still didn't use a tank of gas in 6 weeks.
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 6,689
    ...if you're sorry you bought that hybrid at MSRP + $3K ADM after selling your SUV at a $10K loss off of book value?

    I think it is the combined stupidity of over-paying on one vehicle while getting clubbed like a baby seal on the other that would really fill people with remorse.

    BTW,not everyone has got the message. I recently saw a Craigslist ad where someone was asking $18,000 for a 2007 Prius with 104,000 miles on it.

    2009 PT Cruiser, 2008 Eclipse, 1995 Mark VIII, 1988 GMC Van

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    I recently saw a Craigslist ad where someone was asking $18,000 for a 2007 Prius with 104,000 miles on it.

    You see that a lot with used Prius. People bought into the high resale myth on hybrids. Truth is you go to trade it in and the dealer will give you ZIPPO in trade. It is no better than any other car with 100k plus miles. It is near worthless. The dealer probably offered about $12k with those miles if it was in real nice condition. They probably still owe near $15k or more.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Gary says, "those that traded into an econobox with those little teenie tires."

    I'm guessing "no one" did THAT.

    I bet no one who posts here traded a $30,000 SUV for a $12,000 car.

    The larger compacts are the cars which got traded into mostly - not the "tiniest econoboxes."
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    The Fit and Yaris are two vehicles that have gained sales during this bad car year. I have driven the Yaris and would not give you a nickle for one. My son in law has a Yaris and loves the 40 MPG. But then he moved up from a motorcycle that he rode to work for several years. After going for a ride in my friends 2009 Prius I would put that in the Teenie Weenie rough riders group. While it was roomy enough. It was a poor ride and noisy. I was expecting whisper quiet driving around town. It is far from whisper quiet.

    Truth is there is more to life than saving a few pennies on gas.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Sure they went up in sales.

    But VERY few people who needed the ROOM of a large SUV would have been able to rationalize moving into a car that small.

    Those sales were mostly people out of other larger cars and pickups, not out of large SUVs.

    One of my friends at work traded a Civic for a Yaris and they love the Yaris more than they liked the Civic.

    Just depends on what level of luxury you are accustomed to.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Just depends on what level of luxury you are accustomed to.

    That is absolutely true. When you are used to riding high in a PU truck, down grading to any sedan is not great. I just do not like sedans. I do not like my wife's LS400. It strains my back getting out of it every time. So for me the only upgrade from a PU truck is a large SUV. I have sat in a few small vehicles that I could justify owning. the Old style xB from Scion had a good entry and exit feel with plenty of head room. A Civic to me is no better than a Yaris. My head hits on the headliner of the modern Civics unless I tilt the seat back in a lying position.

    For me as I get older and can afford it the comfort of a luxury SUV, will continue to be my choice. I can also have the satisfaction of supporting the US worker. Most subcompact cars are not even assembled in the USA. Any SUV I would consider today is assembled somewhere in the USA.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,052
    I bet no one who posts here traded a $30,000 SUV for a $12,000 car.

    The larger compacts are the cars which got traded into mostly - not the "tiniest econoboxes."


    The only example I can think of is a guy I know who's yo-yo'ed around when he couldn't figure out what he really wanted. He started 2008 with a paid-for 2004 Tundra. Once fuel prices shot up, he traded it on an '09 Corolla S. He kept it about 3 weeks, hated being in something that small, and traded for an '08 Tundra 4wd extended cab 5.7 V-8. Then when gas went over $4.00 per gallon, he traded for an '08 Accord LX. Last time I saw him, he had traded that one in an an '09 Accord EX-L V-6!

    Back in 2002, my uncle, who had been driving a 1997 Silverado 4.3 V-6, bought an '03 Corolla. While gasoline was still pretty cheap back then, his commute was about to shoot from a 45 or so mile trip to more like 65-70. The truck was also starting to get up there in miles. He uses the Corolla for most of his longer distance driving, and the truck only when he really needs it, or just to give it an occasional run.
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 6,689
    "...My head hits on the head liner of the modern Civic..."

    You must be pretty tall. I rode in a current model Civic last year and at 6' 2" I had no trouble with headroom. The driver was 6' 5" and he fit too. Getting in was a little tight with the steep rake of the windshield.

    If gas prices stay low this summer it will be a good time to step into a smaller car. the car makers always over-shoot on demand and will probably have a nice supply.

    2009 PT Cruiser, 2008 Eclipse, 1995 Mark VIII, 1988 GMC Van

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    I found the Civic and Accord both lacking in headroom. I am only 6' 1". I like my seat upright or it hurts my back. I just do not like sedans. My Passat wagon was ok once into it. Same contortions getting in and out.
  • tankbeanstankbeans Posts: 585
    Makes me cringe thinking of the negative equity he is probably dealing with. Especially since you lose $2k right when you sign the paperwork. Doing it that many times in one year, yikes.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    If gas prices stay low this summer it will be a good time to step into a smaller car. the car makers always over-shoot on demand and will probably have a nice supply.

    I think the next 12 months will be a good time to step into ANY model of car or truck, REGARDLESS of what the gas prices do. Just look at the economy....automakers will be BEGGING people on hands and knees to buy cars when the typical summer purchasing upswing doesn't materialize.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    At over 100k miles, you are getting close to the battery warranty as well. The replacement market for the batteries is still in its early stages.

    The big reason is gas is near $1.60. The Prius is simply another small car right now. I wouldn't mind owning one myself since my commute is about 33 miles. I really don't believe gas will stay this low after the winter months. One bombing in the wrong country could oil up again. Not to $150 a barrel but definitely around $75 a barrel.

    We traded our Explorer for a minivan 5 years ago (just made the last payment on the van yesterday). With 3 kids, minivans are golden. Way more space than the Explorer. No need for AWD.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,196
    Is this the same guy who had the 1962 Ford sedan? Wonder how that did on fuel economy?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,052
    Is this the same guy who had the 1962 Ford sedan? Wonder how that did on fuel economy?

    Yep, same guy. He ended up selling that Ford, too. He lucked out and got about what he paid for it. Which, considering how the economy has tanked in recent months, is pretty good!

    As for fuel economy, probably not very good. The engine wasn't very big, just a 292-2bbl V-8. However, it just had a 2-speed automatic, so they probably threw a shorter axle ratio in to partially compensate. Might not be too horrible in local driving, but out on the highway I'm sure it would drain your wallet pretty quickly.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,834
    i like having 4wd and i bought a big cargo box for the roof of my explorer when i need it.
    most minivans are about the same size as an expedition, too big for me for everyday driving.
  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    We thought we needn't 4wd. But honestly for winter storms, our streets are normally cleared within a few hours. And if it is really bad like ice or extremely high winds, I have the ability to work from home and my wife can make up days later in the week. And since we don't rely on the Farmer's Almanac for weather forecast, we rarely get "surprised" by a storm so we can plan ahead to have the basic necessities and the fun necessities as well.

    The minivan is quite long (204 inches) but we love the space inside! With 2 very active children and one in a car seat, even a three row SUV wouldn't give us the same flexibility. Also the minivan is cheaper.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,387
    I'm with you all the way on that. The minivan is the better choice for us.

    I've tried out SUVs either just for a demo or renting one and I just don't see the appeal. Obviously other folks do.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,834
    it's good to see we are all happy with our choices.
    the original intent of this thread to get people to post about swapping there suv for something they now regret.
    for me there are times when i don't care what the cost of gas is or how much i use, i just want to get home.
    usually getting to work is not a problem.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,387
    Folks like you that knew what they got into and are comfortable with decisions are killing the market. :P

    It's been odd to see what kind of decisions people are making. I can't think of many scenarios where even at $4 gas that swapping out vehicles for better mileage made any sense.

    By my nature I've always hunted cars that got at least decent mileage (which used to mean at least 20 mpg years ago and is now in the low 30s...) but whatever I land on that's what it will be. The thought of losing thousands of bucks to improve economy is pretty odd.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,296
    the original intent of this thread to get people to post about swapping there suv

    I don't think we've had a single poster stating that they dumped their SUV for a more economical ride.

    Maybe we should rename it "Are you happy you didn't sell your SUV?"

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,693
    Seriously, you should. Edmunds posters are much too savvy to think that such a swap would ever save them money overall. ;-)

    However, I do wonder if there were any that KEPT their SUV but bought something cheap and easy on gas to run their errands in while gas prices were so high.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • fezofezo Posts: 9,387
    I know there's at least a couple of those poking around in here.

    To tell the truth when I bought my Celica part of what made it seem almost logical is how much cheaper it is to run than my van. That's not why I bought it though. I bought it because the top goes down. Right now that's not much of concern here but better days are ahead.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,834
    it's not like anyone is going ot admit it anyway.
    not only did i keep my suv(v8 with trailer towing package), i swapped out my 4cyl stick car for a 6cyl auto, last spring. :surprise:
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,296
    What the hey, it's just a title. :shades:

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    How the S.U.V. ran over automotive safety

    According to Bradsher, internal industry market research concluded that S.U.V.s tend to be bought by people who are insecure, vain, self-centered, and self-absorbed, who are frequently nervous about their marriages, and who lack confidence in their driving skills. Ford's S.U.V. designers took their cues from seeing "fashionably dressed women wearing hiking boots or even work boots while walking through expensive malls. " Toyota's top marketing executive in the United States, Bradsher writes, loves to tell the story of how at a focus group in Los Angeles "an elegant woman in the group said that she needed her full-sized Lexus LX 470 to drive up over the curb and onto lawns to park at large parties in Beverly Hills. " One of Ford's senior marketing executives was even blunter: "The only time those S.U.V.s are going to be off-road is when they miss the driveway at 3 a. m. "

    n a thirty-five m.p.h. crash test, for instance, the driver of a Cadillac Escalade—the G.M. counterpart to the Lincoln Navigator—has a sixteen-per-cent chance of a life-threatening head injury, a twenty-per-cent chance of a life-threatening chest injury, and a thirty-five-per-cent chance of a leg injury. The same numbers in a Ford Windstar minivan—a vehicle engineered from the ground up, as opposed to simply being bolted onto a pickup-truck frame—are, respectively, two per cent, four per cent, and one per cent. ) But this desire for safety wasn't a rational calculation. It was a feeling. Over the past decade, a number of major automakers in America have relied on the services of a French-born cultural anthropologist, G. Clotaire Rapaille, whose speciality is getting beyond the rational—what he calls "cortex"—impressions of consumers and tapping into their deeper, "reptilian" responses. And what Rapaille concluded from countless, intensive sessions with car buyers was that when S.U.V. buyers thought about safety they were thinking about something that reached into their deepest unconscious. "The No. 1 feeling is that everything surrounding you should be round and soft, and should give," Rapaille told me. "There should be air bags everywhere. Then there's this notion that you need to be up high. That's a contradiction, because the people who buy these S.U.V.s know at the cortex level that if you are high there is more chance of a rollover. But at the reptilian level they think that if I am bigger and taller I'm safer. You feel secure because you are higher and dominate and look down. That you can look down is psychologically a very powerful notion. And what was the key element of safety when you were a child? It was that your mother fed you, and there was warm liquid. That's why cupholders are absolutely crucial for safety. If there is a car that has no cupholder, it is not safe. If I can put my coffee there, if I can have my food, if everything is round, if it's soft, and if I'm high, then I feel safe. It's amazing that intelligent, educated women will look at a car and the first thing they will look at is how many cupholders it has. " During the design of Chrysler's PT Cruiser, one of the things Rapaille learned was that car buyers felt unsafe when they thought that an outsider could easily see inside their vehicles. So Chrysler made the back window of the PT Cruiser smaller. Of course, making windows smaller—and thereby reducing visibility—makes driving more dangerous, not less so. But that's the puzzle of what has happened to the automobile world: feeling safe has become more important than actually being safe.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    I am sure you are aware that the statistics in that article go directly against the IIHS findings. PU Trucks get the best ratings from the Insurance institute and most large SUVs are also considered safer than most cars. I think we ended the why I don't like SUV thread at over 60,000 posts. You can see for yourself the most dangerous vehicles for passengers are the small to midsized 4 door sedans. The safest are PU trucks and large SUVs. Your article was written by a self appointed SUV hater. There are plenty of them around. Too many for me to run over all of them with my Sequoia. :shades:

    http://www.iihs.org/research/hldi/fact_sheets/personal_injury_coverage_05to07.pd- f
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 6,689
    "...SUVs are bought by people who are insecure, vain, self-centered and self-absorbed..."

    An what about Prius drivers? I understand that they tend to be anal-retentive control freaks who want to feel superior to others and dictate what others are allowed to drive.

    See I can make up stuff too. :P

    I never saw much use for an SUV, they are a bad compromise between a car and a truck and don't do the job of either very well. That said, it's not my business to tell others how to spend their money.

    2009 PT Cruiser, 2008 Eclipse, 1995 Mark VIII, 1988 GMC Van

  • jimbresjimbres Posts: 2,025
    I don't recall where I saw this, but I remember reading a few years ago that the safety geeks who work for IIHS prefer big sedans for their own personal use. For example, one of them drives a Lexus LS - or he did when this article was written.

    Their thinking is that a full-sized sedan gives you the best combination of maneuverability - to help you avoid an accident in the 1st place - & crashworthiness - to help you survive the accident that you can't avoid.

    I'm a sedan/sport coupe guy myself, but I believe that if you came by your money honestly, you should drive whatever you want to drive as long as you can afford it. If I don't like your choice, that's my tough luck.
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