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Aston Martin 643 HYH ??

silversides44silversides44 Posts: 5
edited April 13 in Aston Martin
I need some information for a friend. Her father recently passed on and in the papers she found that he has two cars stored in a garage. She hasn't seen the cars but the paper work on one shows that it was repaired in England for 78 pounds. The only information I have on the auto is her paper indicates an Aston Martin 643 HYH and I can't find any Aston Martin with that designation. She has also said something about it may be the same model used in the James Bond movie but not being a James Bond buff I have no point of reference.

Can anyone please provide a link to additional information on the automobile? Thank you.

Comments

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,557
    Go to the Wikipedia article on Aston Martin for a short summary. "643 HYH" doesn't ring a bell, sounds more like what's on the license plate. Here's what Wikipedia says about Bond and AMs:

    Author Ian Fleming gave his James Bond hero a DB III in the seventh novel, Goldfinger. A long association between 007 and the marque began on screen with the silver DB5 that appears in Goldfinger (1964) and Thunderball (1965). This was James Bond's company car, and in GoldenEye (1995) and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) appeared to have become his private car. In On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) a metallic-green DBS appears at the beginning and end of the movie. After an interlude with Lotus, Aston Martins were again used: a charcoal-grey V8 Volante and Vantage in The Living Daylights (1987). After switching to BMW for several films, the Vanquish appeared in Die Another Day (2002). In Casino Royale (2006), James Bond drives both the classic DB5 which becomes his personal vehicle after winning a poker game, and the new DBS which is revealed to be his new company car in Quantum of Solace (released in cinemas on October 31st 2008)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,779
    I agree that number looks like a license #, not an Aston Martin VIN #.

    Not all Astons are created equal. Some are extremely valuable, and some you can't give away.

    We'll need an actual VIN # to help you or a snap of the car.

    MODERATOR

  • Thanks for the response. I haven't seen the car and the friend who just inherited it doesn't know a thing about cars and couldn't care less. It belonged to her father and she just wants to get it out of the way along with a 1934 MG J2 that is also in the storage garage in Miami, Florida. I told her I'd try to find out something about the Aston Martin. The 643 HYH was on a repair bill from a repair done in England in 1970. Thanks for the response. I'll ask here when she is going back and see if she can get more information.
  • Thanks for the response. I haven't seen the car and the friend who just inherited it doesn't know a thing about cars and couldn't care less. It belonged to her father and she just wants to get it out of the way along with a 1934 MG J2 that is also in the storage garage in Miami, Florida. I told her I'd try to find out something about the Aston Martin. The 643 HYH was on a repair bill from a repair done in England in 1970. Thanks for the response. I'll ask here when she is going back and see if she can get more information.

    It never occured to me that there is an Aston Martin model you couldn't give away. I think if she finds it isn't worth a lot she just may give it to me. She asked my wife if I would be interested in the MG but both cars are way out of my price range assuming they are worth much at all and in decent condition.

    Thanks for the reply.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,557
    I understand she couldn't care less, but these are both potentially valuable, so a little time might be well-spent making sure what she has.
  • Yes, I told her to find a reputable antique auto appraiser to look at both, then get a second opinion, before she does anything.

    Thanks.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,677
    I am sure that's a registration number. I know there are databases of that information in England, maybe someone who reads this and lives in blighty could look it up.

    Both of those cars have the potential to carry respectable values.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,779
    I can recommend a very reputable person out of St. Louis who would be scrupulously fair with her, if she's interested. He'd probably want to buy the cars though rather than merely appraise them, but that can be very convenient for someone in her situation.

    She has to be very careful about this so she is not cheated by anyone. There could be 6 figure money here.

    Ask her to at least read the inscription on the car to identify the model.

    MODERATOR

  • The cars are in Miami Florida. Can anyone recommend reputable appraiser/collector in that general area?

    I won't see her again for a couple of weeks but I have past on to her, through my wife, that she should not do anything until she has had them appraised and I recommended she have at least two appraisials.

    Thanks to all who have responded.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,779
    What she needs is a "real world" dollar amount, not really an appraisal. An appraisal is a legal document. She just needs to know what they are worth. I don't think she needs to go through all the expense of double-appraisals. That gets expensive. She'd only need an appraisal for insurance or probate or tax, that sort of thing. If the cars are all free and clear and settled, then she should just get the market value, not some elaborate 20 page document.

    She should consult with someone who has absolutely no interest in the buying and selling of the type of cars she has. That type of expert can usually nail the real dollar amount.

    If she could take extensive photos and write up a detailed description, she could have this done by Internet I would think. The location wouldn't matter. But she'd have to provide lots of good info to the evaluator. This would be an inexpensive way to do things.

    MODERATOR

This discussion has been closed.