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G8 Problems

2

Comments

  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    Aha - you are correct.
    Oops.
    - Ray
    No help at ALL here....
  • Thank you for clarifying that info for me. I wanted to
    get the v8 but there was none to be found in my part
    of Canada. As a matter of fact, I had to go out of
    province to get this car.
  • gearhedgearhed Posts: 26
    I stop the car when the tops of the outside mirrors line up with an imaginary line drawn across the concrete bar. This stops the point of the front air dam about two feet away. Better safe than sorry.
  • Thanks, I'll try that. Have been VERY careful since.
  • 2 months ago I bought a GM Certfied 2009 G8 GT with about 19,000 miles on it. Love the car but have one issue which the dealer is claiming is normal. When driving at slow speeds (20-30mph) or in traffic, when I just give it a slight amount of gas pedal, I get a constant vibration through the gas pedal that feels like a mild rumble strip on a highway. I've seen many other transmission and vibration problems on this and other G8 forums, but haven't seen this one. Any suggestions would be appreciated, before I go to war with the dealer.
  • You DO know your G8 GT cuts back to four (4) cylinders at LIGHT gas pedal or drifting downhill. This saves gas. AFM (Active Fuel management) or DoD (Displacement on Demand) lets this powerful engine get six cylinder gas mileage if driven lightly. Don't be a numbskull and blame the dealer. It's SUPPOSED to do this and you will get vibration in four cylinder mode.
  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    “Don't be a numbskull and blame the dealer.”

    I find the name-calling offensive.

    As a G8 GT driver, I can make these
    [ potentially useful ]
    comments:
    Though cylinder de-activation can occur at 20-30 MPH, I find that the effect of AFM \ DoD is typically most noticeable at steady speeds between 55 and 65.
    You can monitor the de-activation by driving at the same speeds \ throttle openings in Engineering Mode.
    And you can verify [ or eliminate ] AFM as a possibility, by driving under the same conditions in Sport \ Manual – as AFM does NOT activate in that mode.
    Good luck.
    - Ray
    2009 @ 14,900+ miles . . .
  • i bought a new 2009 pontiac gt in june of this year.. i love the car it is very fast and fun to drive.. but i am having issues with my ac compressor i am currently having the third one installed in the car along with the second serpentine belt... is anyone out there having the same problems with there g8 gt??? thank god it is under warranty
  • Thank you very much Ray. I found the name calling offensive as well , but I did appreciate the info. I did find it strange that the dealer didn't think of the AFM possibly being the culprit. My problem does go away in manual mode, but not in sport mode. When I ran this by the dealer, he did say that the AFM is most likely the issue and he had no ability to deactivate it. He did say that other GM models in the past have had transmission issues and eventually GM comes out with a programming update to address the problem. Despite Pontiac folding, he felt confident the issue would get addressed, as this engine and transmission are used in some other GM models. Until that happens, I'll be using manual mode alot. Thanks again and happy Thanksgiving. John
  • By Numbskull, I take offense that someone would blame the dealer for something that IS supposed to happen.

    "Any suggestions would be appreciated, before I go to war with the dealer."

    The dealers have enough problems without owners going in and starting a "war with the dealer." over vibration inherent in the design. In order to make a V8 get the gas mileage of a six during light throttle, the ECM cuts fuel to every other cylinder. The dead rotating mass is GOING to vibrate more than if all eight cylinders are firing consecutively.

    My GT does it and the other two I test drove do it too. Why complain when you are getting the power of the V8 with great mileage for an engine this powerful?

    Don't complain that the dog sings out of key, but be thankful that he can sing at all.
  • My A/C works, it just clips MPG by 3 to 4, which seems excessive. Actually my only problem has been interior trim pieces that keep falling off (literallly). They are all held in place by cheesy white plastic push-pins. Once they give, they will never hold permanently again.
  • I have had mine back 7 times now, and the vibration I am getting basically comes with the Cruise Control engaged. I will get the vibration without the cruise, but the speed needs to be steady. At 68 MPH the steering wheel vibrates, the shifter, your seat and and the gas pedal all vibrate.

    Pontiac calls it a "characteristic of the performance suspension"? That is a quote directly from General Motors Customer Service and the District Service Manager for GM in North Florida.
  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    "Pontiac calls it a "characteristic of the performance suspension"? That is a quote directly from General Motors Customer Service and the District Service Manager for GM in North Florida."

    That quote is [ um ] incorrect.
    - Ray
    2009 G8 GT w/Sport Pkg suspension - with no such "characteristic" vibration.....
  • sidvsidv Posts: 63
    Regarding if it's normal to have to have the rotors serviced at 1000 miles and why they don't replace them...

    Mine also came with defective rotors. Not surprising since I owned a couple of the last Oldsmobiles and they had garbage rotors as well; I bet GM has been nickel and diming its brake parts suppliers for years and they in turn sacrifice quality.

    Anyway, I had my one month old and 1,000 mile car also have its rotors turned and it fixed the issue. On my Olds, they just replaced them free of charge, 3X times. But the vibrations were worse then, on the G8 it was more mild. I think they see how much material is there and how bad the warpage is and calculate turning the rotors vs. replacing them and they will not replace them if they can get away with it. It would not surprise me if GM would not reimburse under warranty if the rotors were salvageable.
  • jim287jim287 Posts: 13
    Has anyone had troubles with the steering making bad clicking sounds when its cold. This just started to happen last week when the tempatures dropped. When turning right or left it clicks bad like a 10 year old car, not a new one with only 2200 miles on it.
  • When I drove my new G8 GT home, I noticed vibrations from the tires which seemed to have flat spots on them from sitting so long at the dealer. Also, the tire pressures were up near the max pressure as noted on the sidewalls.

    I reduced the tire pressures to 40 - 43 cold. This helped a little with the vibrations and after driving it a few weeks, the flat spots went away.

    The low profile sidewalls at higher pressures are going to make every rough surface felt.
  • jim287jim287 Posts: 13
    Thanks for the reply, but this is clicking sounds when the wheels are being turned even at a stand still.
  • Translation: "We ain't gonna fix it."
  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    "bad clicking sounds"

    HTH:

    #09-03-08-008: Knock Clunk Or Click Noise From Front Suspension Over Small Bumps
    Anyone post this yet?

    #09-03-08-008: Knock Clunk Or Click Noise From Front Suspension Over Small Bumps (Replace Front Lower Control And Caster Arms) - (Oct 5, 2009)

    Subject: Knock, Clunk or Click Noise from Front Suspension Over Small Bumps (Replace Front Lower Control and Caster Arms)

    Models: 2008-2009 Pontiac G8

    Attention: This bulletin is intended to correct a condition for front end knock, clunk or clicking. Vehicles previously repaired as part of Campaign #09203A are to follow a different repair procedure as outlined under the Correction section below.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Condition
    Some customers may comment on a clunk, knock or click noise from the front suspension over small bumps.

    Cause
    The rubber "boot" over the front end lower control arm ball joint may have become dislodged or torn compromising the seal. Moisture inside the ball joint seal may cause corrosion, shortening the service life of the component.

    Correction
    Notice: Before replacing any components under the terms of this bulletin, you must confirm the past service history of the vehicle. Please use GMVIS to confirm if the vehicle was previously repaired under Customer Satisfaction Campaign #09203A. If the vehicle was repaired under this service action, ONLY replace the front control arm found to be the source of the noise and claim the applicable Labor Operation for that part as outlined in SI and the labor time guide.

    Vehicles not identified in Customer Satisfaction Campaign #09203A (or not repaired during its duration) and found to have one or more of the rubber boots improperly sealing should have all four front control arms replaced.

    Front Lower Control and Caster Arm Replacement (Both Sides)
    The instructions below detail replacement of all four front lower control and caster arms.

    Danger: To avoid any vehicle damage, serious personal injury or death when major components are removed from the vehicle and the vehicle is supported by a hoist, support the vehicle with jack stands at the opposite end from which the components are being removed and strap the vehicle to the hoist.

    •Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in SI.
    •Remove the front wheels. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in SI.

    •Loosen the control arm to steering knuckle retaining nut (1) about two turns.

    •Using the J-42188-B Ball Joint Separator (1), disconnect the control arm (2) from the steering knuckle (3).

    •Remove the control arm to steering knuckle retaining nut (1).
    •Separate the control arm (2) from the steering knuckle (3).
    •Remove the control arm to subframe retaining bolt.

    •Remove and discard the front control arm (3) from the subframe (2).
    •Install the NEW front control arm (3) to the subframe (2).
    Warning: The existing control arm bolts and nuts may be reused for this procedure. You MUST remove all traces of the original adhesive patch on the bolt. Clean the threads of the bolt with denatured alcohol, GM Low VOC Brake Cleaner GM P/N 12378392 or equivalent, and allow to dry. Before Installation, apply threadlocker GM P/N 12345493 (in Canada, use 10953488) or blue, medium LOCTITE™ 242.

    Note: The NEW front control arm to subframe retaining bolt (1) must not be fully tightened at this stage.

    •Install the NEW front control arm to subframe retaining bolt (1).
    •Install the NEW control to the steering knuckle.

    •Install the NEW front control arm (1) to steering knuckle retaining nut (2).
    Important: Use the J 45059 Torque / Angle Tool when tightening the following:

    Tighten

    • First Pass: Tighten the nut to 40 N·m (30 lb ft).

    • Final Pass: Tighten the nut an additional 60 degrees.

    •Loosen the caster arm to steering knuckle retaining nut (1) about two turns.

    •Using the J-42188-B Ball Joint Separator (3), disconnect the caster arm (1) from the steering knuckle (2).

    •Remove the caster arm to steering knuckle retaining nut (3). Mark keyway slot on the bushing relative to the cradle.
    •Separate the caster arm (1) from the steering knuckle (2).
    •Remove the caster arm to subframe retaining bolt.

    •Remove and discard the caster arm from the subframe .
    •Install the NEW caster arm to the subframe. Line up the keyway slot on the bushing to previous mark on the cradle.
    •Install the front caster arm to the subframe retaining bolt.
    •Install the new front caster arm to the steering knuckle.

    Note: The caster arm to subframe retaining bolt is not to be fully tightened at this stage.

    •Install the NEW caster arm (1) to the steering knuckle (2) retaining nut.
    Important: Use the J 45059 Torque / Angle Tool when tightening the following

    Tighten

    • First Pass: Tighten the nut to 50 N·m (37 lb ft).

    • Final Pass: Tighten the nut an additional 60 degrees.

    •Repeat Steps 3-20 for the other side of the vehicle then continue below.
    •Install the front wheels. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in SI.
    •Lower the vehicle.
    •Bounce the vehicle several times to settle the suspension.
    •Check and adjust the wheel alignment. Refer to Front End Alignment in SI.
    •Tighten the NEW control arm to subframe retaining bolt.
    Important: Use the J 45059 Torque / Angle Tool when tightening the following:

    Tighten

    • First Pass: Tighten the bolts to 40 N·m (30 lb ft).

    • Final Pass: Tighten the bolts an additional 120 degrees.

    •Tighten the NEW caster arm to subframe retaining bolt.
    Important: Use the J 45059 Torque / Angle Tool when tightening the following:

    Tighten

    • First Pass: Tighten the bolts to 40 N·m (30 lb ft).

    • Final Pass: Tighten the bolts an additional 120 degrees.

    Parts Information
    Part Number
    Description
    Qty

    92244046
    Arm Asm -- Frt Lwr Control Frt Right
    1

    92244047
    Arm Asm -- Frt Lwr Control Frt Left
    1

    92244050
    Arm Asm -- Frt Lwr Control (Caster) Right
    1

    92244051
    Arm Asm -- Frt Lwr Control (Caster) Left
    1

    Warranty Information
    For vehicles repaired under warranty, use:

    Labor Operation
    Description
    Labor Time

    E9505*
    Replace Front Lower Control & Caster Arms (Both Sides) - Perform Wheel Alignment
    2.6 hrs

    *This is a unique labor operation for bulletin use only. It will not be published in the Labor Time Guide.

    Note: If the vehicle was previously repaired under Campaign 09203A, ONLY replace the front control arm found to be the source of the noise and claim the applicable Labor Operation for that part as outlined in SI and the Labor Time Guide.

    GM bulletins are intended for use by professional technicians, NOT a "do-it-yourselfer".
  • jim287jim287 Posts: 13
    Thanks for the info, I will bring this with when I go to the dealer.
  • beibenbeiben Posts: 2
    i had the same problem, they installed a smaller pulley.
  • beibenbeiben Posts: 2
    it is the strut bearings i just had them replaced
  • wigtwigt Posts: 6
    I had to clicking sound when turing the wheel too at cold temperatures. Like beiben they replaced the upper strut bearings and both castor arms. It has been cold since and that seemed to solve the problem. My dealer has been great with any problems that I have had. They even did one of the recalls Pontiac had when it was in for an oil change. Love the car.
  • jim287jim287 Posts: 13
    They replaced the same parts on mine and it too is working fine. The only problem I am having is with excessive wind noise from the drivers side window. They told me it was normal, I will be taking it to another dealer. Thanks for replying.
  • lara6lara6 Posts: 1
    Since we've owned it the mileage range gauge on our 2009 Pontiac G8 continually gives false readings, changing multiple times and ending up with a GAIN in mileage most of the time. The dealer can not fix it, & said GM engineers were working on the problem & hopefully would find a solution to the problem in a 'couple of months,' which was about 8 months ago. GM customer service reps keep saying the gauge is 'working according to its design.' What is the purpose of this crummy design--to irritate & mislead the driver with inaccurate readings of mileage used? 'Working according to its design,' is a phrase to hide behind when there is a design problem that is unfix-able by GM!
  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    edited March 2010
    “false readings”

    You do not specify exactly what you mean by ‘false’.

    My experience [ 2009 G8 GT ] has been that:
    First – the range is rather conservative – to reduce the likelihood of the driver running out of gas, I presume
    Second – the ‘recent’ in the manual excerpt below actually means that it is biased rather heavily to reflect the VERY recent MPG. By this I mean that it appears to look at [ perhaps ] the most recent 25 miles of driving – but disproportionately reflects the MPG in recent 5 or 10 miles [ or 5 \ 10 minutes ] of driving.

    This means that [ for example ] if you have been driving through city streets, with significant time idling at stop lights & accelerating \ slowing in the lower gears, resulting in dismal MPG – the range will reflect an expectation that you will continue to drive in that manner – until you fill the tank.

    But if you then start driving on a highway at a steady 60 MPH, the range calculation will begin to take that [ higher, recent ] MPG driving into account – and though you have used more fuel, the ‘range’ display will actually rise. Sometimes rather dramatically.

    This has happened to me on many occasions – as my commute home from work is precisely this scenario.

    And between my house & where I typically do fill my tank, if I drive directly there as soon as I start my car in the morning – on my way to work, the range display will drop significantly in that 2 miles. Reflecting the relatively poor MPG achieved while the engine is receiving a rich fuel mixture – because it is cold.

    YMMV.
    - Ray

    From the manual:
    The fuel range estimate is based on an
    average of the vehicle’s fuel
    economy over recent driving history
    and the amount of fuel remaining
    in the fuel tank.
  • rayainswrayainsw Posts: 2,526
    I just noticed that you posted on the page I linked to above.
    I presume that means you read all the previous posts -
    including mine...

    Please state your expectations of a range display?
    And how you would expect he calculation to work?
    - Ray
    Really curious....
  • rayainsw #57 reflects my experience. I just ignore that readout. It's like instantaneous MPG, means nothing in the long run.
  • xchipsxchips Posts: 1
    Have a 2009 Pontiac G8, I have had the vehicle in 4-times for the same issue. I keep getting a clucking noise from the front end, the vehicle was serviced 08/09 whereas both left front lower control arms were replaced. Two weeks later 08/09, again both left side lower control were replaced ( dealership cited excessive play ). 07/10 same complaint, dealership replaced all four control arms ( dealership again cited excessive play ). Now here it is two weeks later 08/10 and the vehicle is back in for the same issues.

    I've seen the previous post for clunking/clicking/knocking on the front end and info on recall campaign 09203A. My question is -- is this something that can/should be fixed or it going to an on-going issue. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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