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Toyota Corolla Electric-Assist Power Steering (EPS)

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Comments

  • Im not saying that when your puling in or out of a parking space that it is not easy to turn the steering wheel with one finger or otherwise. I do not believe cars with EPS are going to handle well in general. There is going to be a tradeoff for getting that extra gas mileage and that cheap manufacturing cost. There is no such thing as something for nothing. I have read many things about EPS and enthusiasts who prefer good handling universally hate EPS for its deleterious effect on handling and maneuverability. If i could afford to sell the thing which is what I am going to try to do and then buy a car that I find handles appropriately then I am going to do just that. I spoke to Toyota Executive about the car and I am about to speak to them again tomorrow or the next day. I have attempted to get them to buy it back for an adjusted amount. I do not believe that they will but I am about to try again. I will then attempt to sell it if they do not. Very unhappy with the car and do not believe for one instant that other Corollas handle any better or that there is a fix for the poor handling.
  • terceltomterceltom Posts: 1,017
    "do not believe for one instant that other Corollas handle any better or that there is a fix for the poor handling"

    Now there you go again reverting back to your handling problems. Okay you don't have to believe me that my 09 Corolla drives as straight as an arrow on the highway and you can continue to judge everybody elses Corolla by your own problamatic one. But no one ever said there was a fix for any "handling problems" that you keep referring to. No one even said there WAS any handling problems whatsoever, but that's another matter. The fix was for the EPS straight line drifting effect.
  • You can drive the car straight on the highway. It just requires constant corrections. Both hands on the wheel wiggling it back and forth a little continously. I would have to drive the car after getting the "fix" to believe that that "fix" corrects this problem. I don't belive the complaints refer to people not being able to keep the car moving perfectly straight it just requires a level of effort and attention that I would call ridiculous on any road trip beyond 30 minutes on a straight road or highway. After about 30 minutes it turns into a ridiculously tiring and nervewracking experience. Why buy a car like that when there are alternatives?
  • spikejr1spikejr1 Posts: 13
    edited August 2010
    I understand your skepticism - it is hard to believe that stability can be fixed by a computer. However, this forum has already had 1 poster who has had the fix completed, and now reports that the vehicle is stable. I haven't read any posts that say the fix was done and the problem continued. With that in mind, I'd recommend that you speak with Toyota again, and you "demand" the new fix. Worse case is no change...best case is you have a solid driving vehicle. Also, you could then let the rest of us know if the fix is 2 for 2...or it didn't work so the fix is hit or miss...

    Update on my NHTSA - Apparently there are 2 of us who are trying to sell our car...and they are only going to purchase 1 for testing. I have to submit a blind bid as to what I would accept as a sales price. The only good news is that both of the cars are "S" models with nearly identical features / miles. I will most likely bid near the dealer retail since there is a fix available if they don't buy the vehicle. My hope is the NHTSA is going to find the issue that Toyota has the fix for, and tell them to recall the vehicles instead of just fixing "customer complaint" vehicles.
  • terceltomterceltom Posts: 1,017
    Could there be a pattern that most of these cars with the EPS steering problem are "S" models?
  • spikejr1spikejr1 Posts: 13
    Possibly - I'd be interested in seeing how many of the posts listed the trim level of their Corolla. But I'm too lazy to re-read almost 300 posts :)

    Wonder if the additional body effects on the S model affect the wind flow sufficiently that a unique computer fix is required for steering stability? There was a slight styling change in the 2009 to 2010 air dams...
  • almichalmich Posts: 11
    I feel your pain and I am in the same situation. I bought my 2010 Corolla S because I wanted a reliable car that was inexpensive to own, and driving by brother-in-law's 2000 Corolla CE was not that bad (steering). I have recently became aware of EPS and the issue on the Corollas, and I am trying to sell it and get a car that won't wander on the road. I wish I had known about this issue sooner.
  • I'm with you almich. I would look at the Mazda 3's or Honda Civics. The 3;s I think use an electro hydraulic. I've read they handle extremely well. Test drive it like you normally drive. I'm going to test drive one soon as well as a new Civic. I would definately take a prospective car out on the highway and make dam sure it tracks straight and make sure it turns and steers well. I miss being able to make crisp turns and I miss being able to turn the radio on and just relax when I drive down the street. With column mounted EPS there is no consistent relationship between the turning of the steering wheel and the wheels on the car. It is all variable. So that second nature feeling of just hopping in the car and turning the key and driving with no more effort or thought than simply walking down the sidewalk is history. There is something fundamentally wrong with having a steering wheel and the wheels on a car out of synch and variably so.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Toyota has been selling millions of poor-handling vehicles long-before they offered EPS, but the fix isn't for anything but the wandering problem, I thought, as tom said.
  • pekelvrpekelvr Posts: 61
    Sorry Biff but youre wrong even if you bring your car to the dealer they will not install the new computer box aka module. in fact an alignment does not fix it because the alignment is off whack due to the EPS not working properly. I have the fix, it worked because the computer sends the signal to the EPS to correct the steering so what you feel in the steering is a symptom of an even bigger problem. When I got my car repaired with new accelerator pedal, mats and the EPS computer module they did the alignment and the specs showed every tire was doing practically it own thing. When you go to the dealer and tell them to check the alignment they will do it sure, but Spikegrl is right, they wont do anything more, when my 1st alignment was done I asked them to note my issue with my car and they wrote in the comment "Toyota is aware of an issue concerning the alignment of the vehicle and will either post a recall or notify the dealerships when they have "a fix" No where did they say they would call me, no where did it say NHTSA will tell me. I have to say it loud sorry YOU ARE WRONG!!! MISALIGNMENT IS A SYMPTOM OF THE CAR'S EPS MODULE AND THE BOXES NEED REPLACING!! DONT BELIEVE ME CALL A DEALERSHIP! AND YESTERDAY i POSTED MY INFORMATION BUT THE FORUM MODERATORS WOULDNT LET IT STAY THERE OR OTHERWISE YOU WOULD HAVE BEEN ABLE TO CALL ME DIRECTLY....THEY SAID I COULDNT POST NAMES OR PHONE NUMBERS BUT SHE DIDNT SAY I COULDNT POST A URL. ITS WWW.WAKETECH.EDU AND YOU CAN CHECK THE INFO WITH BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GRADUATING PERSONELL
  • pekelvrpekelvr Posts: 61
    TERCEL IM CONFUSED...IF YOU HAVE DISLIKED TOYOTAS FOR THAT LONG WHY DO YOU COME TO EDMUNDS TO TALK ABOUT THEM? wups sorry for caps. Anyway the reason a lot of us came to the site is because we had a problem and were seeking information and banding together to see if theres anything anyone else knows about the problem. If you think Toyotas been a raw deal forever and then if you have one get rid of it and then you dont have to worry about anymore. I on the other hand have a brand knew Toyota for 3 yrs now as I have owed 2 since 2008 and both had this problem. EPS is a new feature and it was a defective one. Toyota if you didnt realize was voted the safest and most economical car prior to 2008 so that being said I got "the fix" which was the brand new steering EPS computer module replacement and Im trying to let every know my experience which is that the repair has me very satisified to the point I would be willing ot go buy another 2010 Toyota as every other feature is superb but of course when i go to buy it Im going to get on the highway and see if the car meanders at all and if so I will tell the dealer replace the module and i will be back to buy the car. So again if you think Toyotas stink and always have then why are you here?
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Check the usernames again there, boss. ;)
  • terceltomterceltom Posts: 1,017
    Enough already with the caps! I'm Terceltom and I enjoy Toyota's to the point where I currently own three Corollas and wouldn't part with any of them. Now, I would ask you, if you disliked your 2008 Corolla so much to the point where you wanted to sue Toyota, why did you buy a 2010 Corolla ????? And again, your 2008 did not have EPS so where are you coming from?????
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,890
    Yeah - all caps (and excessive punctuation!!!!) often have the opposite of the intended effect, in that people avoided reading them altogether rather than take special note.

    To no member in particular: let's be careful not to make this personal. It isn't yet. Just a pre-warning. :)

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  • spikejr1spikejr1 Posts: 13
    So how about those Cubs?

    Anyway - Thought I'd survey what amount you would accept if you sold your car to the NHTSA for testing...Also, post what type of trim you own for comparison purposes (ie. S model)

    My particular case I found dealer wholesale to range from $13600-$14375, private party $15600-$16200, and retail $17250-17800.

    The NHTSA indicated that they would usually offer to buy a vehicle for a "fair and reasonable" price based on the valuations from the 3 major used vehicle appraisal companies (Edmunds, KBB, NADA). With this in mind, I would think if there were only 1 car in the running, they would offer something close to private party value.

    Also consider that you will lose the tax credit by selling privately and not trading in the vehicle...in my case, if a dealer offers $13600, that results in a savings of $884. So a private party sale would have to be at least $884 higher to be advantageous.

    The wild card is I don't know how desperate the other seller is...heck, they might sell the car for $12k just to wash their hands of the deal...

    Thoughts?
  • biffprestonbiffpreston Posts: 59
    edited August 2010
    Pekelvr What are you trying to say? I know theres a lot more to the driving problems than just veering on the highway and straight roads. Toyota admitted in a press statement which I can easily find or anyone else for that matter that the "fix" did not affect road handling. I wouldn't believe anyone who said that it does either. Column mounted electric steering in which there is a variable relationship rather than consistant between the steering wheel and wheels on the car is not going to handle well period. It is a characteristic of the type of steering system. I don't know how anyone could say they think it handles well. It's not like a different flavor of ice cream. I'm not just unhappy about highway veering. I'm unhappy about the general road handling. The inability to make sharp turns, which is something every car that I have driven over the last 20 years has been able to do except this one. The constant sluggish feel when I attempt to maneuver the car whether for a lane change or a turn which is similar to the feel of having four tires being partially submerged in muddy ground. the loose wobbly feeling at low speeds from having tpo overcompensate with the steering wheel to an excessive degree in order to attempt to keep the car moving in a straight line. This is column mounted electric steering in general on the Corollas. This is not one vehicle out of a million. Someone might have a different definition of handling I suppose. My grandmother for example, whom I love very dearly but has very different ideas about driving than I do. She doesn't believe in driving more than 20 miles per hour and never makes a turn unless it is absolutely necessary. I'm certainly not a brand loyalist. I'm rather disgusted with Toyota for manufacturing the car that I drive. I remember driving a Toyota MR2 back in 1997 and I really liked it. The Corolla is shameful compared that that car. That car while not the most comfortable, handled very well. I loved it and wanted one. Right now I have a modern car manufactured in 2008 and sold in 2009 with modern technology that handles similar to a childs go cart.
  • spikejr1spikejr1 Posts: 13
    Interesting problem you have - I'm not sure that I've read here, or anywhere else that someone is experiencing sluggish steering, shaking at low speeds, or a feeling of tires being submerged in mud. Rather, this thread seems to be people that have loose steering...an uncomfortable feeling that you can't feel the tires or road. The car wanders or drifts and needs constant input. The feeling that an emergency reaction at high speeds would lead to an over-correction.

    Sounds like your steering is too tight instead? I would think that the dealer would be able to ride with you and see the steering wheel shake, or feel the sluggish response. Have you tested another Corolla at the dealership to see if it feels the same as your car?
  • biffprestonbiffpreston Posts: 59
    edited August 2010
    Yes spikejr1 the steering is loose and wobbly and yes there is a serious lack of communicative feeling between the tires and steering wheel. Yes the car drifts on straight roads or highways. And as far as an emergency correction at hign speeds is concerned I'm not certain depending on the situation of course that the car would be capable of maneuvering well enough to deal with whatever situation is at hand. As far as an emergency reaction leading to an overcorrection I don't know. As far as the handling being sluggish if you read Edmunds review of the Corolla, which is extremely diplomatic it mentions that the corolla's handling is on the "soggy side". Soggy is one way of putting it. Column mounted electric steering is well known to be associated with cars that handle very poorly including driftng on straight roads or highways and uncommunicative steering feel and response. This is not isolated to a few cars. This is characteristic of column mounted electric steering. i am uttelry amazed that anyone in actual truth doesn't have a problem with any car possessing column mounted electric steering and all the associated handling and instability issues of which there are a number of different ones associated with this type of steering system. There might be some people who like to drive a car that handles very poorly and has serious stability issues. Perhaps to them it feels great. Having a steering wheel and wheels on the car variably out of sych gives them a constant adrenaline rush from the element of surprise from not having any tactile feedback from the road. If I were to describe the handling characteristics there would not be just one or two pervasive characteristics there are a number. Every aspect of road handling is seriously affected in a negative way by the implemenmtation of column mounted electric steering and believe me when I type those 4 words I get nauseous. Truly a steering system that eliminates the fun of having a car and makes it into a chore to drive.
  • spikejr1spikejr1 Posts: 13
    edited August 2010
    Pekelvr - Can you post the name of the dealership, and their location? I contacted my local dealer, and the Toyota Experience Hotline (800-331-4331) and neither one has information about the EPS Fix. I would like to contact the dealership that repaired your vehicle and get the EPS information just in case the NHTSA does not purchase my vehicle.

    As a side note, I was impressed with the Hotline representative - she actually found a recall for my vehicle that only applies to cold wx areas. I bought the vehicle in LA, but now live in OH so the modification needs to be done. The rep stated that sometimes the recalls are very VIN specific, so it took some time to research. Since the EPS is not technically a "recall" or "service campaign" item at this time, it appears she couldn't see the information.
  • I'm not going to say any more after this. I will say one last thing. The reason Toyota and whatever other manufacturers stick these column mounted electric steering systems in their low end high volume selling cars is raise their fleet average fuel economy to bring it closer to compliance with CAFE standards. They are reluctant to stick these systems into their higher dollar cars. They certainly want to, but they are reluctant. The higher end customers are a bit mre discriminating and have more purtchasing power and can much more easily take their business elsewhere. They are given more consideration. So the low end consumers such as myself are essentially used to raise that fleet fuel economy. This is why column mounted electric steering works itself into a car make from the bottom up. They are reljuctant to make their higher end cars into a dreadful chore to drive.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    What is your basis for the post? Opinion?

    It's fine if it is, I just want to have some idea of how knowledgable you are on the subject; I'm not trying to nitpick. :)
  • pekelvrpekelvr Posts: 61
    What are you talking about....this EPSe is in all theirs and other manufacturer's new vehicles...if they could put it in every car company's would.to work properly for example in their trucks. The Prius has it, the Lexus Le has it, the Corolla S, the Corolla LE in case you didn't know, LE = limited edition....so when you say their "higher dollar cars" what car are you speaking of?? Even the vans have it....EPS is a new revamped feature designed with the intention to assist the driver correction of the steering. It was designed to help with things like ruts in the road and rain and dips and hills....Biff please comment facts.
    I love Toyota!!!

    What is an EPS?

    Power steering (or more correctly for most road vehicles power assisted steering), assists the driver of an automobile in steering by directing a portion of the vehicle's power to traverse the axis of one or more of its wheels. On most road going vehicles there has to be a mechanical linkage as a fail-safe. Originally invented in the early 20th century, automotive engineers have implemented this now standard feature with a variety of technologies.

    The earliest known patent related to power steering was that by Frederick W. Lanchester in the UK, in February 1902. His invention was to "cause the steering mechanism to be actuated by hydraulic power".[citation needed] The next design was filed as recorded by the US Patent Office on August 30, 1932, by Klara Gailis, from Belmont, Massachusetts.[citation needed] There is another inventor credited with the invention of power steering by the name of Charles F. Hammond an American, born in Detroit, who filed similar patents, the first of which was filed as recorded by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office.[citation needed]

    Francis W. Davis, an engineer of the truck division of Pierce Arrow began exploring how steering could be made easier, and in 1926 demonstrated the first power steering system.[1] Davis moved to General Motors and refined the hydraulic-assisted power steering system, but the automaker calculated it would be too expensive to produce.[2] Davis then signed up with Bendix, a parts manufacturer for automakers. Military needs during World War II for easier steering on heavy vehicles boosted the need for power assistance on armored cars and tank-recovery vehicles for the British and American armies.[2]

    Chrysler Corporation introduced the first commercially available passenger car power steering system on the 1951 Chrysler Imperial under the name "Hydraguide".[3] The Chrysler system was based on some of expired Davis patents. General Motors introduced the 1952 Cadillac with a power steering system using the work Davis had done for the company almost twenty years earlier.[4]

    Most new vehicles now have power steering, owing to the trends toward front wheel drive, greater vehicle mass, and wider tires, which all increase the required steering effort. Heavier vehicles as common in some countries would be extremely difficult to maneuver at low speeds, while vehicles of lighter weight may not need power assisted steering at all.

    The earliest known patent related to power steering was that by Frederick W. Lanchester in the UK, in February 1902. His invention was to "cause the steering mechanism to be actuated by hydraulic power".[citation needed] The next design was filed as recorded by the US Patent Office on August 30, 1932, by Klara Gailis, from Belmont, Massachusetts.[citation needed] There is another inventor credited with the invention of power steering by the name of Charles F. Hammond an American, born in Detroit, who filed similar patents, the first of which was filed as recorded by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office.[citation needed]

    Francis W. Davis, an engineer of the truck division of Pierce Arrow began exploring how steering could be made easier, and in 1926 demonstrated the first power steering system.[1] Davis moved to General Motors and refined the hydraulic-assisted power steering system, but the automaker calculated it would be too expensive to produce.[2] Davis then signed up with Bendix, a parts manufacturer for automakers. Military needs during World War II for easier steering on heavy vehicles boosted the need for power assistance on armored cars and tank-recovery vehicles for the British and American armies.[2]

    Chrysler Corporation introduced the first commercially available passenger car power steering system on the 1951 Chrysler Imperial under the name "Hydraguide".[3] The Chrysler system was based on some of expired Davis patents. General Motors introduced the 1952 Cadillac with a power steering system using the work Davis had done for the company almost twenty years earlier.[4]

    Most new vehicles now have power steering, owing to the trends toward front wheel drive, greater vehicle mass, and wider tires, which all increase the required steering effort. Heavier vehicles as common in some countries would be extremely difficult to maneuver at low speeds, while vehicles of lighter weight may not need power assisted steering at all.

    Electric power steering (EPS or EPAS) is designed to use an electric motor to reduce effort by providing steering assist to the driver of a vehicle. Sensors detect the motion and torque of the steering column, and a computer module applies assistive torque via an electric motor coupled directly to either the steering gear or steering column. This allows varying amounts of assistance to be applied depending on driving conditions. The system allows engineers to tailor steering-gear response to variable-rate and variable-damping suspension systems achieving an ideal blend of ride, handling, and steering for each vehicle.[9] On Fiat group cars the amount of assistance can be regulated using a button named "CITY" that switches between two different assist curves, while most other EPS systems have variable assist, which allows for more assistance as the speed of a vehicle decreases and less assistance from the system during high-speed situations. In the event of component failure, a mechanical linkage such as a rack and pinion serves as a back-up in a manner similar to that of hydraulic systems. Electric power steering should not be confused with drive-by-wire or steer-by-wire systems which use electric motors for steering, but without any mechanical linkage to the steering wheel.

    Electric systems have a slight advantage in fuel efficiency because there is no belt-driven hydraulic pump constantly running, whether assistance is required or not, and this is a major reason for their introduction. Another major advantage is the elimination of a belt-driven engine accessory, and several high-pressure hydraulic hoses between the hydraulic pump, mounted on the engine, and the steering gear, mounted on the chassis. This greatly simplifies manufacturing and maintenance. By incorporating electronic stability control electric power steering systems can instantly vary to
  • pekelvrpekelvr Posts: 61
    The system consists of a steering-assist motor on the column with a steering rack at the wheels and a torque-sensing device in the steering column. The column is split into two pieces: the part attached to the steering wheel connects to the lower portion with the steering rack through a torsion rod with a torque- sensing device. “The upper half and lower half have magnetic sensors and as the upper half of the steering column starts to move, the magnetic sensors send a signal to the power steering control computer,” said Lee. The computer moves the motor to match the input torque command. The quicker the driver turns the wheel, the quicker it will respond, with response time in the milliseconds. This system eliminates the lag and the cavitation that can occur in hydraulic systems.

    Ok and the power steering control computer is what my car had replaced becuase it was not doing the job properly it actually was over steering and over correcting within a millisecond moving me left then right and back and forth. Which is why people insist its alignment, because if you have driven a car with bad alignment it bobs you in and out over the road and if you take your hands off the steering wheel all together you will find you car heading off center in a millisecond. So go get the fix!!!! BE SAFE!!
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,890
    What are you talking about....this EPSe is in all theirs and other manufacturer's new vehicles...if they could put it in every car company's would.to work properly for example in their trucks. The Prius has it, the Lexus Le has it, the Corolla S, the Corolla LE in case you didn't know, LE = limited edition....so when you say their "higher dollar cars" what car are you speaking of??

    I'm not knowledgeable in the area of EPS, but when speaking of "higher dollar cars," one generally thinks of those vehicles with a starting cost of at LEAST $40K.

    Regardless of what trim level Corolla one has, it isn't a high-dollar vehicle - it's a nice economy car. "Limited Edition" has always stumped me, as it seems to mean "limited to the number we can sell" rather than describing a perceived rarity of the vehicle.

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  • biffprestonbiffpreston Posts: 59
    edited August 2010
    "EPS is a new revamped feature designed with the intention to assist the driver correction of the steering. It was designed to help with things like ruts in the road and rain and dips and hills...."

    Help with things like ruts n the road and rain and dips and hills?

    Are you saying EPS improves handling and performance? Are you saying that you believe it to be a good feature? a real improvem

    It's easy to dispute what I say and claim that I am ignorant. It's also easy to google corolla steering awful or corolla steering worst handling or corolla steering atrocious and so on and so on and get a near infinite number of hits relating to testimonials from people who are very dissatisfied with their motorized shopping carts. When someone says they think EPS is good and that the Corolla with EPS drives well. I ask myself what their motivation for saying this and what their mentality is. Do they work for Toyota or are they a fanatical brand loyalist?
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,890
    Ugh. This allegation comes up in every discussion when someone's got a viewpoint that differs from the majority who have a complaint. Let's drop the notion that such people are likely to work for the manufacturer - they don't. In my 10 years at Edmunds, I can only recall one instance in which that was true, and we have ways of figuring it out.

    Brand loyalist? Now that's more likely. Or just someone whose driving preferences differ vastly from many in this discussion.

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  • terceltomterceltom Posts: 1,017
    Biff, I think the biggest disconnect here is you keep wanting to discuss "Corolla handling ability" and this thread is dedicated to "EPS problems" which in turn is the sole problem of keeping the car straight and avoiding wandering on the highway.
  • terceltomterceltom Posts: 1,017
    edited August 2010
    I don't think we need an education on EPS. Those of us posting on this thread obviously are well aware of what EPS is, or else we wouldn't be discussing it. We'd rather hear your own opinions rather than reading your copy and pasting from other sites continuously.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Corolla LE in case you didn't know, LE = limited edition

    HA! LE is a trim level, and one of the lowest, that Toyota offers in their Camry and Corolla Sedan. In fact, I'm not sure Toyota offers a sub-LE Corolla since they don't produce the CE and VE anymore. LE is the volume-model Camry, and I'd wager a solid bet that its the most-common Corolla as well. What is the XLE, Xtra Limited Edition? :D It's closer to the loser edition, with such bare-bones standard features. No standard cruise? C'mon...
  • biffprestonbiffpreston Posts: 59
    edited August 2010
    I consider extremely poor handling beyond what i have ever experienced in the past from any other car that I have owned or driven to be an EPS problem. It is definately a result of the EPS. I don't have any more to say anyway. It's nice to vent my rage and let my true feelings be known. I find the car extremely uncomfortable to drive and utterly exhausting and nervewracking on longer drives and or trips with multiple destinations. Lifes hard enough as it is, my God driving shouldn't be such a chore. I'm planning on selling it soon and will be focusing my efforts on doing that hopefully that will be done before school starts back. My main goal is to end up happy with the car that i have to take out multiple times daily and fight city traffic in for the three main purposes of school, work and pleasure. No more cars that feel like your driving in mud, no more veering from side to side on any straight road or highway, no more inability to make sharp crisp turns, no more having to play ridiculous games with a steering wheel that is designed to be variably out of synch with the wheels on the car. I will buy a car without EPS and I will maintain it for the rest of my life if I have to to avoid driving a car with EPS unless a truly new and improved version complete with road feel and good handling is developed. I never thought of myself as even being close to being a car enthusiast before buying a car with EPS. Though not an expert I do consider myself an enthusiast now. I used to love driving. I absolutely loved it. I love a car that feels like it is an extension of you when you sit in it and drive it. With column mounted EPS, and I don't know about other types I will admit, that extension is broken somewhere between the steering wheel and the wheels on the car. It used to put a smile on my face zipping around town and going different places and seeing people and taking little trips. The Corolla with EPS was the cure for all of this.You don't "zip" around town with this thing. You drag the car around town. It's somewhat akin to a ball and chain. Getting around town and attempting to maneuver this thing is a toothpulling experience. I thought this was going to be the best car I had ever owned and it turned out to be the worst by far and by leagues.

    I also want to say that I respect differing opinions regardless of whether or not I agree with them. At least I'll do my best to respect them. Due to my high level of anger over this car it is also nice to have people to argue with.
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