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Subaru Legacy/Outback

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Comments

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    The striker plate can be adjusted fore/aft.

    My Forester has the same problem, but usually it's because the rubber cargo area protector slides back and sort of interferes.

    -juice
  • idahodougidahodoug Posts: 537
    Just realized you'll also need to pull the temp selector lever off as well before tugging the vent holes to remove the upper trim panel. It just pulls straight off - no biggie.

    On reinstall, I had a bit of trouble putting the upper trim panel in. Didn't seem to want to snap back in and after several attempts it went in easy. I wished I'd paid very close attention to exactly what the trim panel alignment at it's top edge was - you should. I think the resistance was the vent tube not aligning correctly into the dash tubes.
  • Thanks ateixeira. I checked the cargo mat, but it is okay. I'll ask the dealer to check the striker plates when I take it in for the 3,000 mile oil change.
  • With my old Chevy Celebrity I got into the habit of brushing my knuckle(s) against the door frame while getting out of the car. I found my knuckle far less sensitive to the shock. I agree with Juice, it was so bad in the winter I would cringe reaching to close the door. My Outback has quite a kick also. I find myself closing the door with the lower edge of the window.
    -Mike
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,916
    Nice handle - wish I had thought of it :-). What racks did you decide on?

    Steve
    Host
    SUVs, Vans and Aftermarket & Accessories Message Boards

    (OC-1, C-1, OC-2, K, IK, whatever....)
  • popgunpopgun Posts: 25
    Hi Canoeist.... neat handel.... I have experienced the same problem with my back hatch but I find that the rubber mat needs to be pushed foward every now and then. Try that again before you get an adjustment. It may be the carpet inderneath works against the rubber, causeing it to creep back. Congratulations on your Outback.
  • grahampetersgrahampeters AustraliaPosts: 1,552
    G'day

    If it is the mat, try putting Velcro under it, secured on the centre lift-up section, to keep it in place

    Cheers

    Graham
  • c_hunterc_hunter Posts: 4,487
    Welcome to the club! Quite a few of us with Subarus and canoes or kayaks.

    Re: the hatch: my new Bean and my older Outback (now my Dad's) are the same way -- the hatch can shut and latch but still be open. I also found that it was usually due to the rubber mat getting in the way. The mat doesn't have to be very far back for it to interfere with the hatch -- it sticks up enough to block the interior panel, which in turn keeps the hatch from completely closing.

    A few other times, I noticed that my wife hadn't closed the hatch hard enough, and the light stayed on. Otherwise, you couldn't tell. If none of that works, the dealer can easily adjust it for you.

    Craig
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Insurance will be higher on the subie than the Isuzu. Heck my buddy has a loaded 2001 Trooper LS and his insurance in the NY area increased by $200/yr from his '95 Mazda 626. I think it is because they are such rarely stolen that they are so low to insure. Leasing an Isuzu will be high $ cause they have poor residual values. They are best if kept for 5-10 years and driven for 200K miles.

    -mike
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,729
    Busy weekend. First time I have had to check the board since Friday. This Tuesday I have a supplier visit that will probably include lunch. Otherwise, 11:30 - 1:00 is open.

    Steve
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,729
    I think you hit the answer when my mentioned cracking a window. The hatch on my '02 OBW is also guaranteed to close properly on the first try if a door is open. Otherwise maybe 30% of the time it seems closed, but the dash warning light suddenly comes on. I would say that it is a well sealed car and the backpressure must be overcome with extra force. You could get the striker moved slightly, but I like the tight fit.

    Steve
  • Glad to know I'm not the only one having to slam the hatch 2-3 times to get it to close properly. If the mat doesn't seem to be getting in the way, how hard do you think it is for the DYIer to adjust the striker? Would you recommend leaving it for the dealer?

    Thanks,
    David
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    When the door seal starts leaking! :) In all seriousness these cars are sealed pretty well and like fibber2 said above I rather have a tightly sealed door than a leaky one.

    -mike
  • eric102eric102 Posts: 122
    I've never had to slam my hatch on my 02 OBW, it always closes on the first try with what I would call normal effort. Never had the dash light go on either. It sounds like some of you need to get the striker plate adjusted.

    Eric
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I've taken a peek, and the striker seems easy to adjust, except it's behind two plastic trim pieces on my Forester. I hate wind noises so I'll just slam it.

    -juice
  • eric102eric102 Posts: 122
    I wonder if years of slamming will take its toll on the hatch or the wiper parts?
  • I currently own a 2000 Subaru Legacy Outback. I need to tow a Coleman popup camper that is right around 2000 lbs (empty). The towing capacity for my Subaru is at 2000. I am really hesitant to put a hitch on it for fear it won't be able to handle it. Why is the towing capacity so low, even on the newer H6-3.0 3.0L Subaru? The 3.0 L Ford Escape with less HP advertises 3,500 lbs. What is THE determining factor in the tow rating?
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Engine, Brakes, Chassis. Most important is the chassis, 2nd is the brakes, 3rd is the engine. Most engines can handle towing even the H4 can probabably tow well. The Wheelbase and chassis are probably the limiting factor as well as risk-benefit analysis by the manufacturer, subaru is traditionally more conservative than ford (can we say low psi in the explorer tires) I'd say a 2000lb trailer + gear would not be an issue on an H6 Outback.

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Just lower the hatch, and push it in while you close it. It actually doesn't require lots of physical force.

    There are some towing topics here in the Town Hall where trailer brakes (add-on kits) are discussed. With those you ought to be fine.

    -juice
  • c_hunterc_hunter Posts: 4,487
    Don't forget the transmission -- it's usually the first thing that will overheat or fail when towing something too heavy. On 5-spd cars, it's an issue of whether or not the clutch can handle starts. On auto cars, it's an issue of the transmission fluid overheating. This is especially problematic when towing in hilly areas and/or in hot weather.

    Craig
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