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Dodge/Plymouth/Chrysler Minivan Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • sorry, I am not able to answer your queston on the Camry. But, I would certainly read the manual and do what they say. A much under read document.
  • eickmeiereickmeier Posts: 19
    Wrruhrig, thanks for the transmission mount update. After the earlier discussion on the "klunk" problem, I carefully examined the front motor mount on my Caravan and it looked fine. The passenger-side motor mount also looks good. I haven't looked at the transmission mount yet because it is somewhat tucked out of the way and not easily visible from either the top or the bottom of the engine compartment. I will check this weekend.
    I imagine this is a straightforward repair as long as you jack the transmission when the mount is removed.
    While obviously annoying, is there any real damage that can be done associated with transmission movement?
    Thanks again for the update information.
  • eickmeiereickmeier Posts: 19
    Xingze Cai, what services are they going to do for this amount of money? A simple transmission filter and fluid change shouldn't cost nearly this much. Five quarts of recommended transmission fluid should cost a maximum of $15. A filter with gaskets should run no more than $20. You could do the job yourself for $35 max and probably do it better! This is NOT a difficult thing to do yourself.
    As swampcollie suggests, get the transmission fluid recommended by the manufacturer. I don't know what Toyota recommends.
  • royallenroyallen Posts: 221
    I would recommend that if you plan to do this service yourself, you need a repair manual for your make and model car. I have a '92 Camry and it has a separate differential that also should be drained and filled when the transmission is serviced. For '92, Dexron is the recommended fluid. Your owners manual should tell the recommended fluid and I expect the owners manual will show if it requires separate service for the differential. The service manual is important to do the job properly including reassembly so that there are no leaks.
    The cost for these items for my '92 Camry is less than $100 and no filter is needed. This 2.2L and automatic transmission has a reusable "strainer" instead. My transmission also has a drain plug so every other service, I just change the fluid at home without cleaning the strainer.
  • mfd395mfd395 Posts: 5
    I would definitly take your camry to the dealer.
  • mfd395mfd395 Posts: 5
    I had the same problem with the wipers and they replaced the turnsignal/wiper stalk./ It works fine now.
  • The only objection I have to my 99 GC is the high beam lights. I saw in here where someone planned on replacing theirs with PIAA super whites. My owners maual calls for #9007. In a search i only see 9004 through 9006 in the PIAA super whites. Anyone done this?
  • Bill Eickmeier: That price is for 30,000 miles factory service, not only for transmission service.

    MATT DIFRANCESCO: Why did you definitely choose Dealer, not other local shop?

    Roy Jared: I found from the manual that the diffencial is required for transmission service. Can I ask you what does "Differencial" mean? Another tank?

    To all of you: How do you guys do those 15,000 miles service or 30,000 miles service to your Caravan and other cars, do it yourself and follow the recommandations from the owner's manual or bring it to the Dealer? I found those job lists from the Dealer or local shop for these service are mostly checking here and there, and those "real jobs" are changing oil and filter, transmission service, cooling service and tire rotation.
  • I take mine to the dealer for 2 reasons...tranny service and tune up. I do not want any mistake made on the tranny fluid and I just feel the dealer is better equipped to periodically bring everything back into spec.
  • royallenroyallen Posts: 221
    xingze: The differential transmits the power from the output of the transmission to the axles which turn the wheels. On rear wheel drive cars they are always separate from the transmission. On some front wheel drive they share the fluid reservoir, others are separate.
    Having primarily owned cars over 5 years old, I have done most of the work the cars have needed and used a local shop for the rest. Sometimes this has had adverse results because I overlooked something like the need to replace a filter in a carburetor inlet which led to a problem with poor idle. When I reviewed the instructions with a kit to rebuild the carburetor, I discovered the need to change the filter. On the other hand, my maintenance and repair cost are less. Also the more I've learned the less likely I am to follow incorrect advice including incorrect advice I was given the last time I visited a dealer service department. I would add that I have a local independent mechanic who is both trustworthy and knowledgeable. One of my strong reasons for dissatisfaction with dealer service is you do not get to talk to the mechanic.
    Most people prefer to put their time and energy on other things than car work and some like to work on cars. I would add I have not done transmission work when removing the pan is necessary. At the same time I've done a somewhat harder (but less messy) job of changing a timing belt. Finally, if you have a car under warranty you must keep detailed records that service meets the manufacturers recommendations to keep the warranty in force.
  • lgrabalgraba Posts: 2
    I have a 1996 Dodge Grand Caravan SE that I have had into the dealer 9 times since it was bought new in July 1996. 3 of those times have been for a check engine light that was related to the transmission, one was to replace a failing battery (that battery failed also failed after 2 years), once to turn the brake rotors, once to replace the brake rotors (6 mo. after they were turned), once for a failed water pump (stranded on roadway), and this last time for a recall and check on the transmission, which appears to be slipping. I was told that the transmission needs an overhaul, which will cost from $1900-$2100. This is not a high mileage car, only 45000 miles.

    I feel that this is an intolerable list of problems, and this is starting to cost me money that I do not want to spend. Is there any way to get some relief from these problems, other than just complaining? Does Dodge do anything about transmissions that fail way too early, or about vehicles that have such poor reliability?

    This car is the most unreliable I have ever had, and this includes a '83 Alfo Romeo GTV6 that I owned for a few years in the later 80's.
  • royallenroyallen Posts: 221
    Sorry the first should be www.autosafety.org
  • egawronegawron Posts: 9
    Four or five new complaints about Caravan reliability. It should be about time for the famous Carleton1 "I never had a problem" posting to show up for the 100th time. Why put off the inevitable, here it is:


    Many Dodge Caravans have zero problems (carleton1). As swampcollie, myself, and many of my friends have experienced. My 1999 Grand Caravan purchased 3/20/99 now has 10078 miles and has performed flawlessly. Gets 18.6 to 29.1 MPG at each refill.
  • I dont see Carleton here... just you to probably try and justify your overspending for your Ody. I really dont see your problem with him saying positive things about his GC. The problem was created with the same people coming in over and over to slam them. I asked repeatedly to be shown the objective data. None has been forthcoming. Might want to check out the Ody problems forum before you get too smug. And those numbers only represent a year and a half of production compared to DC being in its 17th year.
  • I showed conclusively that there were no postings from Ody proponents on the DC threads to justify carleton1's inflammatory stuff about Hondas, so why do you keep bringing this up when we all now know your statement just doesn't hold water?

    Secondly, I recall no postings claiming that the new Ody was more reliable than the 1999 and later DC vans. What I do recall was postings from carleton1 saying that the Ody was "the most trouble-prone minivan." This is what we Ody owners objected to, and pointed that, if history is an indication, DC had a long way to go. And if, as you have said, there have been no statistics anywhere yet that compare 1999s and later with each other, why did you not have a problem with carleton1's above statement about the Ody when there was no "objective data" to support it?

    In the thread titled "has Chrysler fixed their transmission problems" carleton1 recently posted "The answer is YES (carleton1) to the title of this forum. And it happened a number of years ago." Have you seen statistically-significant numbers to support this allegation? Seems to me it's still to soon to say. Doesn't it seem that way to you? Why didn't you object to *this* statement when there's no "objective data" to support it?
  • Karen@EdmundsKaren@Edmunds Posts: 5,023
    ...again. The topic is Dodge Caravan Problems...stick to it. Please be courteous to other members of the Town Hall by posting helpful comments/information.

    KarenS
    Vans Host

    Karen-Edmunds Community Manager

  • lgrabalgraba Posts: 2
    I have a 1996 Dodge Grand Caravan SE that I have had into the dealer 9 times since it was bought new in July 1996. 3 of those times have been for a check engine light that was related to the transmission, one was to replace a failing battery (that battery failed also failed after 2 years), once to turn the brake rotors, once to replace the brake rotors (6 mo. after they were turned), once for a failed water pump (stranded on roadway), and this last time for a recall and check on the transmission, which appears to be slipping. I was told that the transmission needs an overhaul, which will cost from $1900-$2100. This is not a high mileage car, only 45000 miles.

    I feel that this is an intolerable list of problems, and this is starting to cost me money that I do not want to spend. Is there any way to get some relief from these problems, other than just complaining? Does Dodge do anything about transmissions that fail way too early, or about vehicles that have such poor reliability?

    This car is the most unreliable I have ever had, and this includes a '83 Alfo Romeo GTV6 that I owned for a few years in the later 80's.
  • howarthhowarth Posts: 2
    My brother works in parts at a Dodge dealer. He said the 'phantom wiper' issue is very common on 96-98 vans. Replacement of the wiper switch assembly 'cures' it - at least it did on my 1997 GV. (6 months with no mystery wiping) This part should be under recall for the 1998, but not 1996-7.

    FYI - I bought the new wiper switch assembly from the dealership db works for. DB found a pricing issue. The recalled/replacement part and the 1996/97 part are identical BUT the two parts have different part numbers in the parts catalog. So if it's replaced under warranty one part/price is charged, if it's paid for my the owner the other part/price is charged. Guess who gets the better price - big suprise. The recall replacement is $30-$50 LESS than the 1996/97 part. So if you're paying for the replacement switch out of your own pocket, have the parts guy look up both parts and give you the CHEAPER one. And don't fall for a line about how they're really different parts. The 1998 recall replacement is working great in my 1997 GV.
  • pjjqbypjjqby Posts: 3
    I am considering purchasing a base 2000 Caravan/Voyager. Are there any issues w/the 4-cyl model other than hp?
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