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Quintessential Mid 90's Loser Cars

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,852
    Sorry Lemko, but there are some people who simply aren't winners, no matter what they're behind the wheel of. And now that I think about it Nippon, I believe he DID get the Delta from his parents!

    I only met Muffin a few times, but he annoyed me every single one of them. Probably haven't seen him since 1992 or so. My guess is that nowadays he has a Prius that he brags about hyper-miling when he's not busy trying to beat Freecell game #11982.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,852
    Yep, a 1971 Pontiac Grand Ville convertible

    Something I just thought of...I wonder if the Grand Ville was actually the longest GM convertible by that time? GM stopped doing C-body convertibles. They also didn't let Pontiac have a C-body, so Pontiac just stretched out the B-body and on the closed models, grafted on a C-body roofline the best they could. Anyway, the Impala/Caprice convertible was on a 121.5" wb, while the Catalina, LeSabre, and Deltas were all on a 124". The Grand Ville was porked out to 126". An Eldorado was 126.3", but I wonder if the Grand Ville might have had more overhang, and therefore more overall length?
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 4,080
    Or Cavalier convertible.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,737
    I say the Aerostar is a front runner too.

    I'd go for the Astro. One of the biggest POC's I've ever had the displeasure to drive (my wife's uncle was disabled and had one with a rear lift).

    Around here, you usually see Astros packed full of farm workers' family members. I guess it's the cheapest transportation with a lot of seats. And this is not a racial comment. It's just that who would possibly CHOOSE to drive this monstrosity if they had any sort of choice?
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 4,080
    They made a lot of Astro conversion vans... Not my definition of luxury. I think they kept making the Astro through the early 2000s.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,685
    I will put in my 2 cents worth and nominate the Yugo.

    Also any compact or subcompact that has been modified with aftermarket accessories (think being riced out).

    There is this one guy at work that drives a Ferrari untill you get close to it and notice that the interior is a Fiero with a kit body covering it (but I think that the Fiero was stopped in the 80's).

    In reality anything from the mid 90's on would be a loser car unless it's a classic. Come on now if you cannot afford to drive a car less than 15 years old what does that say?

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,685
    I had a Corsica, while not the most exciting car it certainly wasn't a loser car. It had decent acceleration and gas mileage ran pretty much trouble free for me until about 140K miles when I sold it and the buyer (a friend) drove it close to another 100K with little trouble.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 4,080
    Come on now if you cannot afford to drive a car less than 15 years old what does that say?

    It could say that you have a car that you like that runs well.
  • That was Conan's actual SHO. I work with the woman that sold it to him new. He didn't know how to drive a stick at the time and had to have a friend come drive it off the lot for him.

    By all accounts he loves, think it was the first new car he ever bought, that car and the segments he has done on it are just kind of a tongue and cheek way of praise for it.

    The Tercel is a good choice for a mid 90s loser car.
  • The Neon had the ACR version that Chrysler made specifically for racing in Solo I and II plus they had actually pay outs to people who raced Neons and did well. At that time the two most competitive cars in many SCCA classes were Miatas and Neons.

    Later on you had the STR-4 Neons that dominated SCCA rally racing in the 2WD class up until the series was canceled.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,121
    I try to give everybody the benefit of the doubt. My girlfriend wife had this guy who's now a lawyer who still had a crush on her from high school driving around our house and neighborhood in a brand-new black Mercedes E-Class. She saw him once in 20 years at her high school reunion and he cried when she told him she had a boyfriend (me). After the reunion, he drove around our house looking for her for the next five years and only spotted my ugly mug instead! Finally, the guy gave up and married this big nasty girl who probably kicks his butt every night. Speaking of loser cars, didn't your cow-irker have an Olds Silhouette minivan?
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,025
    Olds Silhouette minivan

    The "Cadillac of Minivans" lol

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • fezofezo Posts: 9,328
    I had a Corsica, while not the most exciting car it certainly wasn't a loser car. It had decent acceleration and gas mileage ran pretty much trouble free for me until about 140K miles when I sold it and the buyer (a friend) drove it close to another 100K with little trouble.

    I can vouch for that. Had one for a rental back in the day and managed a speeding ticket in it.

    Cadillac of minivans - almost cost me a keyboard.

    The Yugo is its own little category. Didn't they only go to 1992? Not quite mid-nineties. One of the best arguments against Reaganomics was the fact that it produced Yugos in the marketplace.... Fiats without the world famous Italian quality control....
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    They made the Astro and Safari vans up to 2005.

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I'd definitely vote for the Metro and Aspire. The name 'Aspire' always cracked me up...like, "Next time I'll aspire to move up to an Escort"!

    The GM dustbuster minivans...at least they were original and had dent-resistant body panels. The 'softening up' of the front end near the end of the model run, was an improvement IMHO.

    I'd better watch it..my Edmunds 'handle' was put out there some time back when I couldn't think of anything else. I'm sure my wife's Uplander will be on a similar list for the decade after the '90's!

    Bill
  • extech2extech2 Posts: 120
    I can't believe that no one mentions the Honda del Sol (or was it del Stol) can't remember
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I'm amazed at how many cars on this 'list', I've owned or had close contact with.

    I bought a brand-new bright red '89 Beretta GT, which I enjoyed (before they started putting large graphics to differentiate the GT model); I also bought a new '90 Corsica 4-cyl. 5-speed which was reliable and still good-looking after 108K miles (in fact I think Corsicas looked good for a four-door; better than the Beretta), and I bought a new '93 Caprice Classic with F41 suspension. I was 35 and my wife 28 when we bought that car; I'm sure we were Chevy's youngest Caprice customers that year!

    My mother-in-law had a bright blue Honda delSol bought by her gentleman friend because he thought she looked 'cute' in it. Yes, I had a Caprice when my mother-in-law had a Del Sol!

    Bill
  • steine13steine13 Posts: 2,411
    i just found this discussion.
    wow, you guys are rough...

    i've owned two of the vehicles on the list, and i liked both of them... an 89 LeMans that my wife drove for 2-3 years, and a 92 aerostar that, mile for mile, was probably the most expensive car i've owned... it leaked something different every 3 months, it seemed. so yeah it was a piece all right.

    for all that, i really liked the aerostar for hauling, traveling, and canoeing. a very pleasant vehicle for a family with a small child.

    And the LeMans was cool because (i) it was a carbon copy of the mid-80s Opel Kadett (E); (ii) i got it for $1,500 bucks, and (iii) it was dirt-cheap to run, easy to fix, and fairly reliable. of course, ours had no p/s no a/c no cruise no nuthin.. there wasn't much left to break.

    i'm gonna also have to disagree with the suzuki sidekick someone mentioned; those are considered excellent off-roaders. not that i'd want one myself.

    most of the others, esp. the corsica/beretta/skylark/... are just foul.
    cheers -mathias
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,016
    wow, you guys are rough...

    Notice that there's little, if any, consensus. :)

    My neighbor has an Aerostar and it is a good hauler, 4x4 to boot. His drives like a sick pig however.

    OT - I haven't thought about an Opel Kadett for years. Wasn't there a Miata-like one that had flip up headlights?

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  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    I agree with you about the LeMans. I was too young to apprecaite the original, and having just moved here from Europe, it reminded me of the Opel Kadett, which was a decent hot hatch back then. So here as a teen I actually wanted to get a LeMans.

    I wonder if the car would have more success under a different name. Maybe the fact that GM took a legendary name and slapped it onto a Korean subcompact ticked off and turned off people from trying it that otherwise would have bought it if it were named something else.

    And steine, don't worry if you had these before. The whole discussions is whether anyone drives these cars now, and how they're perceived by others for doing so.

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

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