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Subaru Outback Roof Rack Comments

2

Comments

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    My Sienna has a very wide spread - you can set them a mile apart.

    Ironically I rarely use it, because so much fits inside! :D
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,948
    Lots of whitewater kayaks and C1s are so short these days, you can put a few of them inside a minivan too. :D
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yep, my old college roommate did that when we went boating. Fits easily.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    I ruled out the 2010 Forester X for the very same reason - lack of a roof rail! You can put single-point mounts on there, but you loose the flexibility the rail affords. I ended up with an X Premium. It boggles my mind that any manufacturer would label a vehicle "SUV" and not include a roof rail. :confuse:
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    Same for my Caravan. About the only time I use it is when I visit the hardware store and pick up long (10'+) lumber or when I go dipnetting every July (I use it to hold the nets).
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    The X is one of those price leaders.

    It looks awkward - no tinted windows, no roof rails, plastic wheel covers.

    IMHO Subaru is just trying to get something in at around $20k.

    Remember that AWD is standard, so every competitor can sell their base model for $1700 or so less.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    I could live with all of the deletes except the rails. After all, I had never owned a vehicle with factory-tinted windows until now, power seats are somewhat awkward when there is no memory setting and you have two (regular) drivers, and while I love heated mirrors, I could have gone without.

    I do like the price point, though. ;)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Nissan, Honda, and Toyota have similar entry pricing but they're FWD, so they carry a cost advantage.

    Go back and look at my 1998 Forester L - I swear it was much better equipped. I got roof rails, cargo cover, mud guards, lower cladding all around, rear bumper guard, and styled steel wheels instead of plastic covers.

    Oh, and a full size spare, too.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    You're not imagining it. It was better equipped. But, given the rise in costs over the last 12 years, and the not-so-linear rise in cost of vehicles, it is not surprising that manufacturers have de-contented their entry models in order to keep prices down. Most everything else: electricity, fuel, food, building materials, you name it, have at least doubled in that same time frame.

    Heck, you used to be able to get cross bars, a cargo tray, and a cargo cover all as standard equipment, and I'm sure those are pretty cheap to produce.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Now it's a $400 or so protection package.
  • nes2nes2 Posts: 14
    Check this out
    http://subaru.eu/Legacy/wallpaper/800/s02c08f06.jpg

    This the Euro version of the outback - looks cooler to me and you can attach any rack you want. Why did they have to turn the american version into a goose with a lousy rack?
    I might have to consider the volvo XC70 - it has a solid rail and can carry 250Ibs- way more than the OB.
    Unfortunately its fuel consumption is high and its pricey.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    I cannot really tell... is there no rail at all on that one?
  • nes2nes2 Posts: 14
    It just has a rail that you could use to attach any roof rack you want without the limitations of the north american outback. Check out this link to see all the euro versions. The europeans even get a legacy wagon. How come the europeans always get the best versions?!

    http://www.trucktrend.com/features/news/163_news091014_euro_spec_2010_subaru_out- back_and_legacy_tourer/index.html
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,268
    Oh, yeah. Very nice; very subtle! Thanks for sharing those links. The typical NA customer is a curious one; an oddity in the world. ;)
  • abzabz Posts: 13
    I had been worried about how to securely carry larger kayaks on the fixed with cross-bars of the 2010 Outback.

    I just found a Thule rack system that has its own frame and allows me to extend the cradles up to 5' apart. The system is the Thule Slipstream 887XT for anyone who had the same concerns.
  • nes2nes2 Posts: 14
    Interesting but its still attached to the factory crossbars which have poor bar spread. When you use the Thule tool to determine which thule rack is best for you then it doesn't recommend the slipstream for the 2010 outback. I called Thule myself and they didnt recommend this model?!
  • abzabz Posts: 13
    I saw the rack on an Infinity FX35. The crossbars on that didn't look to be more than 30" apart. When I measured the Outback, it looked like a 32" spread. My Outback is on order (I own an '05 LGT wagon now). I'll let you know how the rack works when I have the new vehicle.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,948
    The slickest rack system I've seen in a long time is on a guy's Prius out in California. You have to search his site to see the photos since there's no direct link to them.

    He uses Yakima Landing Pad #7 kits and if you don't mind drilling holes in your roof, you gain a nice clean look while the rack is off the car.

    Getting the factory rack off would be a whole 'nother can of worms though. Nothing a little Bondo couldn't handle though. :)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I wonder what the max spread is on the Venza, perhaps the most direct competitor? Also on the Honda CrossTour when it arrives?
  • steine13steine13 Posts: 2,409
    edited December 2010
    I thought I'd post something I learned elsewhere on the web: Yakima has worked up a solution where the factory folding crossbars are completely removed, and a "Landing Pad #12" is bolted in place, which will receive Yakima's "Control Towers."

    The bar spread is reported to be 30 to 31 inches, a meaningful improvement. If you google a little, you will find a picture of the setup.

    I've had Landing Pads before, and if mounted solidly, they are my favorite rack attachment. No play, no adjustment, just set the rack in its place, rotate the lock 90 degrees, and you're good to go. It's not as good as having a track in place of the factory rack, but it'll do for most things.

    Interestingly enough, if you go to the Yakima web site and try to configure a roof rack for your '11 OB, they'll try to sell you something different; a "Railgrab" setup that has less spread and won't be nearly as solid.

    Being able to carry a canoe or two is important to me... I tried to attach a picture but I guess I gotta try the link: link title

    Cheers -Mathias
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