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High End Luxury Cars

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Comments

  • oacoac Posts: 1,594
    Instead of bragging that its interiors are made of wood from the same tree, give me a vehicle that will steer with road feel and whose steering wheel is not made out of slippery wood. Give me a car that will corner without body lean instead of like a big, bloated barge.

    Give me a Bangle BMW 7 series!


    Howard: Your needs and desire in a car are NOT necessarily those of the majority. You hardly even notice the interior content of your car... LOL.... Need I remind you that BMW is NOT the benchmark in the HELM space. Far from it. In fact, BMW's only claim to fame is its driving dynamics. That's it. Oh, lets add the 4/50K free maintainance service.... The Bangle design remains as polarizing today as it was 3 yrs ago when the new 7-series came out. I certainly do NOT like it any longer. Even the new e90 is a poke in the eye of Bangle. If Bangle is such a styling genius that everyone is copying, how is it BMW banished him, and ensured their new e90 will NOT be Bangled ?

    The LS460 and the S550 will set the benchmark in this class starting in 2006. BMW would scramble to save 7-series sales. A re-do for the 7 won't be out of order, and soon too.
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    While not exactly the same different gear that merc1 proposed, you might be interested in 2006 Predictions: The Lunch We All Wish We Had an Invite To. What do you think?
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    You also may be interested in this article: First Drive: 2006 Maybach 57 S.

    Just thought I'd mention this as well since I'm here. :)
  • hpowdershpowders Posts: 4,269
    You know, I kind of think your clients wouldn't object if you transported them in a BMW 760Li.
    I and many, many others feel comparable BMW models are at least the equal in prestige as Mercedes.

    Call it what you will: "soul" or an undefinable metaphysical something else.
    All I know is BMW has it. Lexus doesn't.

    I suppose you can prove your rather omniscient statement: "Cars have no soul. People do."
  • hpowdershpowders Posts: 4,269
    BMW banished Bangle?
    I thought BMW promoted him indicating he will be with the company for a very long time.
  • rayngrayng Posts: 70
    Most clients notice what I don't drive more than what I drive. One day, I pulled up in my wife's Honda and they wondered if my car was in the shop. It was.

    Whereas my younger clients (30-40s) think bimmers are as good if not better than Mercs, most of my clients who are baby boomers do note a difference. As superficial and image conscious as we are(n't), many of the people I work for do notice.

    As to what BMW has and Lexus does not, I think it's a matter of preference. My dad's ES330 is smooth quiet and refined. The 745 is fun, fast, comfortable, and also refined. I do enjoy driving down my parking garage during the weekends. But other than that, I don't get to drive the car as aggressively as I like. Ultimately, the difference between Lexus, BMW, and Mercs is a matter of preference.

    BTW, I can't "prove" the supernatural. Can you prove BMW has a "soul"? :P
  • brightness04brightness04 Posts: 3,151
    So we agree that the original LS400 was much rounder than S class of
    that time. The original LS400 still looks like a today's car, whether you
    consider that Lexus or Toyota look is quite besides the point . . . the
    point being that the original LS400 was at the very forefront of the
    bigggest style transformation that has taken place since 1989: cars
    becoming like melted soap shaped

    At the same time we both agree that the S class in 1989 looked like
    cars from an entirely different era, with the boxy styles of the 80's. How
    in the world could Lexus be accused of copying a car that looked
    entirely different?

    The common luxury car themes, such as slab side, broad shoulder and
    high belt time dates back to 1906 Rolls, regardles you know it or not. Why
    not 1886? Because cars were toys for the rich back then, and the concept of luxury cars did not
    exist, regardless how "really silly" you think it is.

    The Mack Truck illustration is called Analogy. Please read analogies
    carefully and understand the ramifications and what is being analogized
    before tossing around words like "ridiculous." Calling someone's post "ridiculous" is not exactly a rebuttal.
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    And if it is not a rebuttal as you say, you don't need to respond defensively, yes?

    To all, let's tone down the personal issues that are going on here. They are not doing anything whatsoever to contribute to an educating and stimulating discussion, so let's just leave them by the side of the, um, road. Okay??

    Thanks. :)
  • hpowdershpowders Posts: 4,269
    Sure. Everyone who drives a BMW knows what I am talking about.
    Call it soul or an indefinable something.
    But BMW's got it.
    Some people can see Tinkerbell. Some can't.
    What can I say?
  • Let me tentatively suggest that when a professional or a vendor shows up in an S Class, 7 Series, etc. the image is one of a hard working rich guy driving, in all probablility, a leased car that is in large part a tax write off. Everyone knows this. The secretaries probably say, see one of 'em, seen 'em all. (Both the cars and the drivers.)

    Imagine a different scenario. Maybe you work in a community with the climate of Chapel Hill, NC. You, Mr. CPA or you the folding box company president show up in a three year old Morgan with leather belts across the hood. Or maybe, you work/live in the snow belt and you show up in a mint 1986 Jeep Grand Wagoneer. Maybe you show up at the client's with a base 911 you bought 3 years ago. Tossed in the back is a gymn bag.

    IMHO for those concerned about their image and their "presentation of oneself" the above vehicles convey a much more assured, less striving image. An image of a man of parts. Not just a guy that knows where to sign a lease. For a lot less money.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    This interesting point about a car having a "soul", . . .

    I went to dictionary.com to see what was listed as the definitions, and most of the definitions were about the obvious spiritual meanings, but this one got my attention:

    sole = The central or integral part; the vital core

    So, a car DOES have a soul. And what it has always meant to many is that some cars have a "special feeling" when driven and have "unique characteristics" that "identify that particular car" or type of car for what it is.

    When I was younger, I owned a Ferrari (I needed to get it out of my system I think) and it had qualities unlike ANYTHING I had ever driven. It had a soul. And so did my Carrera (no longer own, either). BMW's have a soul, Mercedes have a soul, as most cars do, of course. Not too long ago, on the autospies website, there was discussion regarding the problems with the Mercury vehicles. It was suggested that the problem with the Mercury vehicles was that they had no soul! And that was their very problem. Interesting indeed, and maybe true?

    So who ever says a car has no soul . . . stands corrected by the dictionary definition as well as the obvious historical expressive use of the word as it applies to cars.

    TagMan
  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    Not even my wife's 83 MB300D will scare off my clients!

    My clients dont care what I drive as long as my investment advice makes them rich enough to afford a lifetime of high end marques.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    as it should be, dewey
  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    The following is an article from Businessweek. As you said voice recognition will make BMW idrive issues irrelevant:

    Scott Nelson, an analyst for Honda's planning group in Torrance, Calif., says: "In a few years, voice-recognition will be good enough to let you say, 'Find me a Beatles tune,' and the stereo will search satellite radio or programmed music and find one."
  • hpowdershpowders Posts: 4,269
    Right. It's really a special exciting feeling that is transferred from a high performance vehicle to the driver.
    If you have to ask, you haven't driven one of these vehicles.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    Right. It's really a special exciting feeling that is transferred from a high performance vehicle to the driver.

    I would agree the feeling is probably most obvious in a high performance vehicle, but I would not go so far as to say all ultra-luxury cruisers lack soul. It's more likely just "different".

    If you have to ask, you haven't driven one of these vehicles.

    YES . . . or . . . as I believe . . . that some people simply do not "connect" with their car!
  • oacoac Posts: 1,594
    Let's see if we get this correct: The 745/750 has *soul*, but the LS430/460 doesn't ! Right ? Although I'd confine such statements to the realm of the sublime to the ridiculous, but YMMV...

    Now let's move on.... Merc1's post on predictions is a good one and well worth our attention and comments.
  • brightness04brightness04 Posts: 3,151
    Sure. Everyone who drives a BMW knows what I am talking about.
    Call it soul or an indefinable something.
    But BMW's got it.
    Some people can see Tinkerbell. Some can't.
    What can I say?


    I think HELM is quite a materialist pursuit, not that of the spiritualists. People who see Tinkerbell are an even smaller minority than those who see Santa Clause or tooth-fairy ;-)
  • brightness04brightness04 Posts: 3,151
    If you define "soul" as "the central or integral part; the vital core" how can anything be without "soul"? Even a homogeneous pound of cheese has a vital core, without which you will have less than one pound ;-)

    Mercury vehicle certain has a soul by that definition; without the drive train there would be no functional Mercury vehicle.

    IMHO, that definition cheapens "soul" in this context.
  • brightness04brightness04 Posts: 3,151
    Very much agree with the gist of what you are saying. A small exception: some professions do need a reliable car, which in the mechanical world often means a relatively new car if not brand new car from a reliable marque. That's one of the reasons why historically, HELM's were usually founded on a core value of reliability: Rolls had the Silver Ghosts that kept on ticking for 25yrs; Bentley had the 24hr race records, which in early days was more about reliability than sheer speed; Mercedes was the very definition of automotive reliability in the 70's and 80's. Other brands, even if expensive, were never really considered HELM brands, such as Ferrari, Lambo and to a lesser degree BMW (which even among BMW fans, are prized for the 3 series not 7 series).
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