Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





High End Luxury Cars

19909919939959961156

Comments

  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    Just imagine what kind of flop Casion Royale would be if Bond and his fellow agents and villians were racing around with LS460s, ES350s and Toyota Camrys?

    In movies there is a close link between the car and the character that drives the car. Some cars are driven by Steve McQueen and other cars are driven by Larry David.

    FORD RELEASE:
    FORD CO-STARS IN NEW BOND FILM

    By Daniel Wallace, FCN

    In true Bond style, 007's mode of transportation for most of the movie is an Aston Martin. The luxury automaker is showcasing its newest product, the Aston Martin DBS, a car that captures the elegance of a DB9 and the power of a DBR9 race car.

    It's a role coveted by other automakers. According to Al Uzielli, senior advisor, Ford Global Brand Entertainment, Toyota offered the Broccoli family, owners of the Bond franchise, a multi-million dollar deal to put Bond behind the wheel of Lexus' supercar.

    "The beauty of Aston Martin is that it's such a natural fit for the character," said Uzielli, grandson of Henry Ford II. There's also a long-standing family relationship since Henry Ford II brokered the deal with Albert 'Cubby' Broccoli to showcase the '64½ Ford Mustang convertible in the Goldfinger film.

    From the brand of the liquor Bond drinks to the cars he drives, filmmakers pay close attention to detail, making sure every element is consistent with the setting and is sensible for the film.

    "We're all in a business where we have to be extremely careful in where we take our brands. It just wouldn't seem right to have the consummate British agent drive a Japanese car. Regardless of what the money was, in the long run, it's 'where does that take your brand?'" Uzielli said.

    The Jaguar XJ Sport and XJR and Land Rover Range Rover Sport, also take part in the action -- driven by both Bond and villains in high-speed chase scenes. Bob Witter, manager, Ford Global Brand Entertainment, says Ford has greater room to negotiate because of the wide range of vehicles it can offer through its many brands.

    Romero says product integration gains brand exposure in a way traditional marketing cannot. "Die Another Day," he says, generated more than a billion positive impressions for the company worldwide.

    "If you integrate products into a film that, first of all, make sense with the script and, secondly, work well with the creative, you successfully get your marketing message across. I think movie-goers will find that Ford has a lot to offer," he said.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    Those thousands of S Class owners in Japan must be kicking themselves and wondering why the heck they didn't buy an LS460 or MPV instead.

    Oh yeah . . . And now that the Mazda MPV is above an S-Class, we'll have no problem discussing it on this forum. ;)

    Seriously, the award was not a "people's choice award", or any representation of what the Japanese people truly think. It came only from a "committee".

    In fact, the LS460 is a very poor seller in Japan, and is noteably rejected by the Japanese people themselves. Who knows better than the Japanese themselves as to what a Lexus really is? And the vast majority of them continue to say "no thanks".

    In real Japanese life, it is a fact that the BMW and Mercedes are among their most coveted vehicles. Smart, those Japanese, very smart.

    TagMan
  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    In fact, the LS460 is a very poor seller in Japan, and is noteably rejected by the Japanese people themselves. Who knows better than the Japanese themselves as to what a Lexus really is? And the vast majority of them continue to say "no thanks".

    The LS has sold in Japan for about 17 years without the Lexus logo. But that in itself should not have hindered LS sales since Toyota has sold other expensive cars in Japan without a Lexus logo.
  • garyh1garyh1 Posts: 386
    Thought you folks might find interesting the following highlights from an article in the LA Times 11/15/06:

    In Japan, a Lexus just doesn't have that cachet

    Despite its popularity in the U.S., the Toyota brand faces skeptical consumers at home.


    ... in Japan, most luxury car buyers have eyeballed the Lexus, kicked its tires and said, "Give me something European."

    Germany's Mercedes and BMW are still the luxury cars of choice in Japan. Mercedes, owned by DaimlerChrysler, sold more than 58,000 cars in Japan last year; BMW has delivered 38,400 in the first 10 months of 2006....

    When Lexus made its debut in Japan in September last year, Toyota executives said they expected to sell 50,000 to 60,000 vehicles in the first year. They have sold just half that after more than 14 months on the market.

    "The reality is that, ironically for Toyota, Japan is proving to be a difficult market," said Christopher Richter, an auto industry analyst at CLSA Asia Pacific in Tokyo. "Their difficulty here is that there is greater panache in owning a Mercedes or a BMW. In the U.S., the Lexus is a sensible reward for personal success.

    "But in Japan, people want something that says, 'Hey, I spent stupid money on a car.' "

    Getting that kind of reaction with a Lexus is difficult in Japan, where the name still means Toyota and doesn't generate much of a frisson. Unlike in the U.S., where Toyota established Lexus as an independent premium brand, Lexus models sold in Japan were all previously marketed as Toyotas: the Altezza, the Aristo, the Soarer and the Celsior.

    "Lexus models are just changed models of Toyota cars that didn't sell well in Japan," said Makiteru Ishikawa, an auto industry journalist and a panelist who helps select the prestigious Japan Car of the Year.

    He said Toyota's corporate culture remained too focused on high volumes, failing to understand that premium cars must be exclusive, not just expensive.

    Toyota executives acknowledge that the launch has been slower than hoped.

    "We don't know why they are a little more cautious about buying Japanese for luxury," said Paul Nolasco, a Toyota spokesman in Tokyo. The problem is not that no one knows the Lexus name, he said.

    Toyota's research surveys put Lexus brand awareness at 84% of potential car buyers, about 10 percentage points below BMW and Mercedes but still a high level of penetration.

    The problem is that Lexus is far behind Mercedes when respondents were asked whether the car represented luxury (though it polled roughly the same as BMW in that category)....

    "I know the mechanics of Japanese cars are excellent, but to me, the outside looks are similar to every other Japanese car," said Emi Bamba, 57, who has been driving a Mercedes for the last 20 years.

    She drove a Cadillac before that after she saw how easily her Japanese Mazda was crushed in a traffic accident. "Japanese cars don't make any impact on me," Bamba said.

    That failure is clearly galling to Toyota, which is accustomed to generating mostly happy corporate news. Toyota is not just the world's most profitable auto manufacturer. It is in the passing lane preparing to overtake General Motors Corp. as the world's largest seller of cars.

    With its pioneering hybrid cars, Toyota continues to swipe market share from Detroit's automakers and saw its profit soar to $3.44 billion in the last fiscal quarter alone.

    Toyota's Nolasco said the news wasn't all bad. Sales of Lexus' IS and GS sedan series have captured nearly one-third of the market against the Mercedes and BMW brands they compete against, he said. And in September, Toyota added the LS460 to the lineup, selling 12,000 of its most extravagant model so far.

    Toyota's competitors aren't about to gloat — publicly, at least.

    "A Lexus is essentially a Toyota in the minds of Japanese consumers, and Toyota focused for decades on serving a mass market, so the Japanese see Toyotas as a mass product," said Yuchiro Ito, a spokesman for BMW Japan. "But Toyota is extremely serious about developing a serious product, and once they have put the Lexus models through a full cycle of changes, the real battle will begin."...

    "The people buying Lexus now tend to be small company owners who live in small towns," said auto journalist Ishikawa, who says most Lexus drivers are over 40. "They don't want to be regarded as rich or rumored to have made money by doing something wrong. And small company presidents whose businesses deal with Toyota only buy Toyota cars, even if they have the money to buy Mercedes or BMW."

    Nolasco said Toyota could generate buzz for the Lexus with changes in design and styling. And the Lexus LS460 has features aimed at anticipating the needs of drivers and passengers, such as infrared sensors that read body temperatures and then provide each rider with individually attuned climate control.

    But critics like Ishikawa say Toyota needs to think about the driving experience. He drove the LS460 and found it flawless. "It ran fast, powerful and safe," he said. But there was a deficit in the pizazz department.

    "There is no characteristic that brings pleasure in owning it or a feeling that it is fun to drive," he said. "If cars can be said to represent the national culture, then Toyota Lexus is the car that represents Japan.

    "It is a straight-A student."


    LA Times
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    I heard there were protests against Daniel Craig as the new James Bond. One of the reasons was because he couldn't drive the stick shift Aston Martin. Imagine that, a James Bond who can't drive stick? Wussup with that, Dewey? I wonder where we'd be today if John Wayne and Clint Eastwood couldn't ride a horse.

    A stick, a stick, my kingdom for a stick!! (I'm getting a little carried away here.)

    ;-)
  • That is a beautiful looking vehicle, but I have to agree with LG on the look of interior.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    I heard there were protests against Daniel Craig as the new James Bond. One of the reasons was because he couldn't drive the stick shift Aston Martin. Imagine that, a James Bond who can't drive stick?

    I don't believe that for a split second. Hollywood hype is as rampant as always.

    TagMan
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    That is a beautiful looking vehicle, but I have to agree with LG on the look of interior.

    The interior is not without faults, and the S-Class interior is nicer, IMO. It is not seriously flawed, however, and that said, it is a minor weakness considering the scope of the entire vehicle The new gorgeous XK has almost the same interior layout but has essentially improved the one distinctive weakness which is the "hood" over the central navigation, audio and climate control touch-screen. Beyond that, I am quite fine with it, and I do believe that you are right on the money when you say it is a beautiful looking vehicle.

    TagMan
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    Well I heard the rumor and your disbelief motivated me to google it. As it turns out, it was indeed a rumor.
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    The Jets/Bears game just barely got started and Lexus already showed three separate LS ads. The first two promoed the parking gizmo and the third promoed the 8-speed transmission.
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    Well I heard the rumor and your disbelief motivated me to google it. As it turns out, it was indeed a rumor.

    Of course I am glad to be correct, but I must say that I appreciate your quest for the truth. Nothing like a good reality check.
    Very cool, D-man.

    TagMan
  • garyh1garyh1 Posts: 386
    Same 3 LS commercials have run early in the Redskins/Bucs game on Fox. Clearly Lexus is doing a big media buy for football fans.
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    Thanks, Tag. It's a never-ending quest for truth, justice, the American way.
  • OK, here is my first question! How come the cars today
    are always done is bland colors?? ie: When you buy a ANY car today the interior (and most of the time) the exterior looks like seating for "The almost dead"?

    I haven't seen a 2007 car that has a good looking color scheme yet. 98% of all new car interiors are egg shell, gray, black tan, etc. NO red, blue, yellow Green.

    I used to drive Cadillac's and Jags. back in the 70's and 80's. I could get any color of leather I wanted. They were very nice. Not just all Bland! If you had a yellow Cad. you could get yellow cloth or Leather interior! That goes for green, red, blue, brown, black white, aqua, etc.

    I have not bought a new car in years and I'm not going to until I can get an interior that doens't scream (undertaker) evertime you get in!

    What's the problem? The only cars with color in the interior are the ones with the camel interior.

    No colors, no sale!
  • tagmantagman Malibu, CaliforniaPosts: 8,441
    OK, here is my first question! How come the cars today
    are always done is bland colors??


    Good first question, superman. ;)

    While there are rare exceptions to this, you are correct!

    A major reason is that the manufacturers must make models that will sell easily and quickly. No dealer wants to be "stuck" with a car that only a tiny percentage of buyers might be interested in, and have it sits on the lot until an interested buyer finally comes along, if ever.

    If a significant percentage of buyers wanted blue, red, or green interiors, then they would be widely available.

    Over the course of many years, the color preferences for cars interiors and exteriors has made itself known. In addition, market research further illuminates the preferences of buyers.

    Quite a few years ago, for example, silver replaced white as the number one exterior color choice.

    With enough money, I am under the impression that some of the high end marques will custom build you a vehicle with your very own color and material choices for the interior.

    Perhaps that will solve your dilemna.

    BTW, Resale value could be negatively affected by an unpopular or unusual color, or could be difficult and challenging to sell . . . just a thought.

    TagMan
  • Gary, thanks for posting the article. It seems to reflect exactly what has been discussed on this forum, especially the LS460. I could almost swear that the article was written by a member of the forum.
  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    It's a never-ending quest for truth, justice, the American way.

    Especially with regards to Finnish built Porsches.
  • deweydewey Posts: 5,243
    1)I could almost swear that the article was written by a member of the forum.

    Nope I am not responsible. Honest it wasn't me!

    2)Also this article posted by Garyh1 is quite insulting about Japanese German car buyers:

    But in Japan, people want something that says, 'Hey, I spent stupid money on a car. Most Lexus drivers are over 40. "They don't want to be regarded as rich or rumored to have made money by doing something wrong.

    In otherwords Japanese German car buyers are regarded as stupid, rich Soprano-type characters. I dont think that is complimentary at all.
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    Oooh, touche! Now, now, it was only a parody. No slight intended to our Canadian friends, among which you are a luminary!

    ;)
  • garyh1garyh1 Posts: 386
    It's a never-ending quest for truth, justice, the American way.

    Actually, based on the issue under discussion, it's more like "the British way." :P

    And what a coincidence that the very next post came from none other than "clarkkent"!
Sign In or Register to comment.