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It's Time to Play "WHO AM I"?

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Comments

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Yes, my town was a Chevy town. A few guys had Fords but they were far from cool. Convertables were laughed at and Chrysler products were few and far between. Even today a lot of the old "Cholos" remain and it's not uncommon to hear the sweet sound of a split manifold on an old Chevy six.

    1948-1954 Chevys were probably the most desired and the town is still full of them.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Yeah, they were odd. did you watch that short video? I was trying to decide if that interior fabric was original. It appeared to have a black vinyl headliner and I don't think it came like that but I can't say for sure.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,681
    edited May 2011
    I have no idea. I'm not very keen (or interested) in what's exactly correct on mass-produced cars. If it's close to right, that's good enough for me. Of course, I'll research things like this for people who deem it important but if it were my car, I could care less if the glove compartment hinge was really from a '51 instead of a '50.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Oh, I'm not that fussy either and in the case of an oddball like that Crestliner, it would be near impossible to find reproduction interior fabric anyway unlike a '55 Bel Air.

    I was just wondering if you happened to know.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,681
    No, I don't have any good books on that particular car. I could probably find out but it would require some time to do that. I have to say I've never seen anything like that on a similar type of car, so it does look a bit dubious.

    Nice thing about cars *that* obscure--nobody else knows either!
  • berriberri Posts: 4,008
    Didn't Kaiser do that same vinyl roof thing in lieu of hardtops (or convertibles in their case) around the same time as the Crestliner?
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,937
    I was thinking of that car too, the Kaiser Virginian

    There was also a Model A with a fake convertible top.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Yeah, I do remember the Kaisers had something similar that almost looked like bamboo or straw.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    You know, Ford made a lot of versions of the Model A and the one I'm thinking of was a "Victoria". Very rare and actually very nice looking.

    I know that at least some of those did come with a padded top.

    And I think they also made a coupe that was susposted to look like a convertable with side irons and all.

    Now I'm going to have to go look!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,937
    The Victoria was a pretty car for the price and time. The car with fake landau bars was simply the "sport coupe" IIRC. When I was a kid an old friend of the family had one...looks like a convertible, but it isn't.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Back in about 1970, I knew a guy with a '63 Impala SS. A nice car but nothing that special at the time. A guy wanted to trade him straight across for a NICE Model A Victoria but the guy refused.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,681
    edited May 2011
    Well the A, like many early 30s cars, did not have a roof stamped from one piece. It was sectioned and then a rubber/vinyl or whatever the hell it was, covering went over the open center portion of the roof, which was re-inforced with wood.

    Only after the Budd Company (makers of railroad cars) taught the auto industry how to do large stampings, did cars get "turret roofs"...maybe what...1936 or so?
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,358
    Yep, they called them "turret tops". I didn't know they got them from the railroads though.
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