Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Ford Crown Victoria and Mercury Grand Marquis

14849515354102

Comments

  • R92688R92688 Posts: 7
    Thanks you for the comments. The CV is a great car that takes alot of beating and keeps on going. It will be very unlikely that I will ever be in a situation like a police cruiser and get rear-ended at high speed. Just the same, I will move forward and get the small modifications done to my 95 CV. I still prefer to be in it for the defense against all those SUVs and trucks out there. MASS equates to energy as well as safety.
  • My Father is getting a 96 GM LS with 71K for $6500. He will get the 2 year warranty insurance by Chubb Insurance for about $1400, which covers almost everything. Is this a good idea? The car seems to be pretty good.
  • rea98drea98d Posts: 982
    The only common problems I know of on '96's are intake manifolds made of play-doh that self destruct after a while. The bad news? It will eventually happen, if it hasn't already, and the Grand Marquis s one model Ford's not offering an extended warranty on that part. The good news? It's only about $400 to fix, much cheaper than the $1400 extended warranty. If it were me, I'd pass on the extended warranty, considering the Mercury's record, put $400 of that in the bank waiting for that time bomb of an intake manifold to go, and buy beer & pizza with the...oops, I mean save the rest for the kids' college fund ;-)
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    Do the 2003 Crown Vic/Grand Marquis still use a rigid live axle in the rear?
  • cuesewcuesew Posts: 3
    Just a note to all... I have had my 1999 Grand Marquis for about 5 weeks now... All I can say is I LOVE IT!!!! I bought this car with 11,000 miles for $10,000 private... The car rides as nice as my 95 town car with more toys.... I would like to have better gas miles... But am very happy with the looks, ride and comfort... Since I have owned this car, I can't believe how many I see on the road.....
  • Hello all,
    This forum has been a pleasure to read and extremely helpful on problems with my 93CVLX. However, I have a new problem that I have not seen addressed previously. The air conditioner fan now only works in auto mode for a short while then quits completely. I have to set it at max hi for it run again. If I put it anywhere else in between auto and manual hi, it stops altogether. Has anyone experienced this problem ? Any ideas would be much appreciated. TIA Bedra
  • harmarharmar Posts: 94
    out of curiosity, are you getting? I've seen complaints in prior postings about getting 16 mpg, but a buddy who has driven GMs for years has consistently averaged 22 - 26 (town - freeway), and I've averaged 25 - 28 (town - freeway). My buddy tends to have a lead foot, while I do not.

    My '00 GM is, without a doubt, the best car I've ever owned. Gas it, service it per factory suggestions, and go! (I am aware of other's suggestions re: rear axle problems, etc.)
  • ron35ron35 Posts: 134
    93cvowner - I have had this problem with several vehicles. The cause of your problem is a defective variable resistor, which controls the fan speed. In some vehicles it is under the dash and in others it is on the firewall under the hood. It normally is not an expensive part but it can be difficult to get to. Unfortunately I cannot tell you where it is on a 93 CV.

    Ron35
  • kinleykinley Posts: 854
    Maximum 35 lbs per tire.
  • Hello again guys. Two of my power windows have come down with a problem with the cables that make them go up and down. The motors work just fine, but the windows are not moving. I recall that this was discussed a long time ago here, but I cannot find it. I am thinking that it must be prior to the new forum and I cannot figure out how to access the older boards. If anyone remembers what the problem was and how to solve it, I would be ever so grateful. I love my CV it runs flawlessly other than these two problems. Thanks again guys.
    Bedra
  • ron35ron35 Posts: 134
    Bedra - Below is a post I saved from a different forum www.crownvic.net (they have archives and FAQ which you can go to for further help). There is someone who advertises on E-Bay (do a search on For Crown Victoria) who sells these power window regulators, which he has rebuilt using stronger materials, they are cheaper than from Ford and supposed to last much longer.

    "It actually pretty easy. Fortunately I bought a couple of specialized tools in 92 that make the job much easier and less time consuming. On average takes about 30 minutes. You can alway rent the two tools I've described or carefully use the alternate meathod.

    Tools Needed
    Regulator ($45+-)
    Drill
    Pliers
    1/4 inch (I think) drill bit
    Hammer
    1/8 inch punch (I think)
    Vacuum
    Large 1/4"? rivet gun
    2 long and 2 short aluminum or better still nylon
    rivets
    Special tool is to mill off the existing aluminum rivet head (on the window glass) for easy removal. Imagine a short 1/2" diameter mill end with a hole in the center to use in your drill. The shaft from the rivet, in the middle of the head fits into this hole and mills off the rivet head. Facilitates pin removal with minimal stress on the glass.

    From Memory
    Disconnect battery.
    Remove the door panel.
    Pull window glass to 3/4 up positon.
    Mill off rivet head from window. Need to align with opening in door. Gently tap out the rivet pin with punch/hammer. (or support back side of regulator at window rivet with piece of wood and knock out pin W/O breaking glass!)You'll need to reuse plastic/metal spaces. Metal to inside.
    Use 1/4 inch drill to drill out rivet. (may need to hold back side of rivet with pliers if it starts to spin)Then do 2nd rivet at window.
    Knock out other 2 rivet pins in door and drill out rivet in same manner.
    Remove 2 nuts in window regulator at top center of door.
    Disconnect elec wire from motor.
    Remove 3 screws in door to remove elec motor. 1 or 2 of the screws only need to be loosened and motor will pivot out from open hole.
    Manipulate and remove regulator. Dont need to remove window unless you want some more room (remove rubber seal at top first)It's a bit tight with the two studs at the top, jussut go easy.
    Vacuum up all debris from inside door, floor and elsewhere.

    Insert new regulator. Two nuts at top finger tight for now.
    Connect motor to regulator hub. BE CAREFUL not to pull outward on hub. It may come out, wire and all.
    Secure motor to door. May need some adjusting as you go.
    Insert 2 rivets (do not expand yet)at door to regualtor.
    Insert disks into window holes. Move window up so holes align with opening in door to insert rivets.Probably need to connect battery and raise regulator to position and insert rivets.
    Align and fit rivets in holes and verify proper placement glass in track and regulator.
    Secure rivets in door.
    Secure rivets in window.
    Tighten 2 nuts at top of regulator.
    (an alternate to rivets is nuts, washers, bolts and lock tite. Be VERY careful tightening nuts in the glass. Very easy to get a bit strong and shatter the glass.)
    Check operation of glass. Use silicon on track.
    Replace door panel.
    Now you're ready for the other side.
    Secure rivets in window

    It actually pretty easy. Fortunately I bought a couple of specialized tools in 92 that make the job much easier and less time consuming. On average takes about 30 minutes. You can alway rent the two tools I've described or carefully use the alternate meathod.

    Tools Needed
    Regulator ($45+-)
    Drill
    Pliers
    1/4 inch (I think) drill bit
    Hammer
    1/8 inch punch (I think)
    Vacuum
    Large 1/4"? rivet gun
    2 long and 2 short aluminum or better still nylon
    rivets
    Special tool is to mill off the existing aluminum rivet head (on the window glass) for easy removal. Imagine a short 1/2" diameter mill end with a hole in the center to use in your drill. The shaft from the rivet, in the middle of the head fits into this hole and mills off the rivet head. Facilitates pin removal with minimal stress on the glass.

    From Memory
    Disconnect battery.
    Remove the door panel.
    Pull window glass to 3/4 up positon.
    Mill off rivet head from window. Need to align with opening in door. Gently tap out the rivet pin with punch/hammer. (or support back side of regulator at window rivet with piece of wood and knock out pin W/O breaking glass!)You'll need to reuse plastic/metal spaces. Metal to inside.
    Use 1/4 inch drill to drill out rivet. (may need to hold back side of rivet with pliers if it starts to spin)Then do 2nd rivet at window.
    Knock out other 2 rivet pins in door and drill out rivet in same manner.
    Remove 2 nuts in window regulator at top center of door.
    Disconnect elec wire from motor.
    Remove 3 screws in door to remove elec motor. 1 or 2 of the screws only need to be loosened and motor will pivot out from open hole.
    Manipulate and remove regulator. Dont need to remove window unless you want some more room (remove rubber seal at top first)It's a bit tight with the two studs at the top, jussut go easy.
    Vacuum up all debris from inside door, floor and elsewhere.

    Insert new regulator. Two nuts at top finger tight for now.
    Connect motor to regulator hub. BE CAREFUL not to pull outward on hub. It may come out, wire and all.
    Secure motor to door. May need some adjusting as you go.
    Insert 2 rivets (do not expand yet)at door to regualtor.
    Insert disks into window holes. Move window up so holes align with opening in door to insert rivets.Probably need to connect battery and raise regulator to position and insert rivets.
    Align and fit rivets in holes and verify proper placement glass in track and regulator.
    Secure rivets in door.
    Secure rivets in window.
    Tighten 2 nuts at top of regulator.
    (an alternate to rivets is nuts, washers, bolts and lock tite. Be VERY careful tightening nuts in the glass. Very easy to get a bit strong and shatter the glass.)
    Check operation of glass. Use silicon on track.
    Replace door panel.
    Now you're ready for the other side.
    Secure rivets in window"
  • I'm strongly considering purchasing a 2001 Crown Vic or Grand Maquis in the next few days. I've been researching the 02's and 03's CV and noticed that when the Handling & Performance pkg was added, it included dual exhaust. I can't find any similar info on the 01's however. Is there any way that I can tell for sure if the CV has the handling package? Also, does the GM even come with that option?

    Thanks for any help. I look forward to owning what looks like it's going to be a great car.
  • johnclineiijohnclineii Posts: 2,287
    Both CV and GM come with handling package. The surest method to ensure the car has it is to count the exhaust pipes. Two means the car does. One means it doesn't.
  • rea98drea98d Posts: 982
    Just be sure and get down under the car and count the actual exhaust pipes, and not just the tips sticking out the rear end. My T-Bird has dual exhaust tips, but only one exhaust pipe that splits in two just before it gets to the back of the car.
  • jsylvesterjsylvester Posts: 572
    the alloy wheels are different - the "lace" pattern similar to an early 90's BMW.

    Exhaust and wheels are the easiest giveaways.
  • gmarquisgmarquis Posts: 11
    I have a problem that started this weekend. I was in a store parking lot getting ready to go home and my 2000 Marquis wouldn't shift out of park. I went through everything a couple of times but it just stayed locked in park. I was finally able to get it going by putting the ignition switch to off (but not in the steering wheel lock position), shifting into neutral, starting the car, and them putting it into drive/reverse. When I got home I noticed that the brake position sensor fuse was blown. I thought a new fuse might fix it, but two fuses both blew as soon as I put them in. I noticed a smell from the fuse blowing and remembered smelling the same odor when I
    was driving earlier, but I can't remember if it was before or after the problem occured, so I don't know if it was the original cause, or
    the aftermath from driving with whatever relay involved in the park lockout circuit activated. Anybody else ever have this problem? My wife is driving the car right now using the workaround, but I need to get it into the dealer if it isn't something I can do myself.
    Thanks ahead of time,
    Ted
  • johnclineiijohnclineii Posts: 2,287
    The lacy spoke wheels are no longer a guarantee the car has the handling package. Ford made them available as an option without the handling package a year or so ago.
  • beembeem Posts: 2
    Just purchased a 2001 Grand Marquis LS, but now notice that it does not have dual exhaust. I was under the impression that dual exhaust was standard on the LS. Is this correct? Thanks
  • johnclineiijohnclineii Posts: 2,287
    Nope. Dual exhaust comes with the handling package. No handling package, no dual exhaust, as far as I know. The dual exhaust means an increase in horsepower and torque, a different rear end ratio, and, to some extent, lower gas mileage.
  • beembeem Posts: 2
    When I purchased my 2001 GM LS from a dealer, they did not give me the door pad code. Any ideas on how to find the code to be able to use the door pads? The manual says it may be taped to the computer module. Where is the computer module? If its under the dash on the driver's side, it looks like I'll need to pull off or disassemble the plastic cover on the underside above the brake pedal.
  • kinleykinley Posts: 854
    tells you how to change the code so you can use a different one that came from the factory. I use my wife's birthdate as the alternate on both cars so one code opens both the T Bird and the Towncar.
  • I believe I recall a TSB re: some defective brake interlock switch on '00 GMs. Whether there is one or more and whether you can replace it/them yourself, I don't know. This TSB came out within a year of their introduction, if I remember correctly. Good luck.
  • rea98drea98d Posts: 982
    "The dual exhaust means an increase inhorsepower and torque, a different rear end ratio, and, to some extent, lower gas mileage. "

    I'll give you the benefit of the doubt, and assume you meant the handling & perfornace package in that sentence, cause whether the car has dual exhaust, single exhaust, or whatever, has nothing whatsoever to do with rear end ratios.
  • iusecadiusecad Posts: 287
    which would you buy first?


    an ex 1999 Crown Vic cop car for $6200 or a 2000 Grand Marquis for $13000? (I think the Merc has the HPP because of the lacy wheels and dual exhaust, but thought it was not available on the GS in 2000.)

  • rea98drea98d Posts: 982
    Depends on how long you want to keep the car. If you're only looking at driving it 2 or 3 years, save your money and get the Ford. If you're looking to keep it 10 years, then definately get the Mercury. Being an ex-cop car, and a '99 to boot, the Ford will be pretty well used up. I'd guess it probably has 150,000-180,000 miles on it, just for a ballpark figure. There's also the luxury aspect to consider. The Ford was a cop car, and most police depts cheap on on luxury features in their cars. The Mercury is likely to have better interior quality and more "gadgets" than the ex cop car, have less miles, and less abuse, hence the higher price. I'm not saying there's not much life left in the Ford, but if you're looking for a car for the long haul, the Mercury would be a better choice. If you want a decent car for the time being, with plans to upgrade in the next 2 or 3 years, I'd save my money and go with the Ford. All of what I said has been generalizations, of course. You've seen the cars, I haven't, but ask yourself what you really want out of a car, and pick out which one of the two will best fit that, would be my advice. (My advice, BTW, is worth exactly what you paid for it ;-)
  • iusecadiusecad Posts: 287
    when you say the Ford has 150,000-180,000 miles on it, are you figuring in idling time? Because the listing says it has 74k. [ Those are links, if you didn't realize - check out the spiffy 2-tone brown on the Ford! ;) ] Otherwise I agree with everything you said, although the only real dificiencies with the Ford is the lack of center arm rests for the front seat; a "camper light" mounted on the ceiling; the antennae base still on the roof; and the unknown of how much idling it went through... I do like the spot light. How would the Merc look with one? :0
  • After what I must admit is a very cursory review
    of information available on various internet web
    sites, I have reluctantly concluded that a de
    sign flaw (gas tank situated behind rear axle)
    is probably responsible, at least in part, for
    the fires that sometimes occur after very high-
    speed rear end collisions. Apparently, even
    a high level Ford executive has conceded (I be-
    lieve under by questioning by some plaintiff's
    attorney) that more gas tank related fires have
    now been reported with the CV than with the
    notorious Pinto. That said, because of its laud-
    able performance in both the NHTSA and IIHS-HLDI
    crash tests, and its weight (which I've read de
    creases the likelihood of occupant injury or death in the event of a multi-vehicle collision,
    all other things being equal), I am interested in
    purchasing a CV. I know of one municipal pol-
    ice department that has arranged to have its ex-
    isting fleet of CV Interceptors undergo fuel tank
    modifications so as to hopefully reduce the risk
    of fuel tank rupture and subsequent fire (fuel
    tank bladder and safety-shield). My question is
    this: as a private citizen, would I have access
    to such services, and if so, are they affordable
    (the definition of affordable, I realize, is highly subjective)? The foregoing question as-
    sumes that one would have already followed the
    recommendations issued by Ford in a TSB, the sub-
    ject of which is reducing the fuel-tank puncture
    potential of a hex-bolt which, by virtue of its
    proximity to a vulnerable part of tank and its
    sharp edges, could conceivably puncture the tank
    in a rear end collision.
    Since, I only drive about 7000 miles a year, unlike alot of law enforcement officers, is this
    a case, to borrow from Shakespeare, of "much ado
    about nothing?" Please, if any one can offer
    any advice to help this writer put this thing in-
    to perspective, it would be greatly appreciated.
    If you've read the page of the Center for Auto
    Safety's Web site which is dedicated to the Crown
    you might wonder if this car is in fact safe (and
    I know it is!!!)
    Thanks for your consideration
Sign In or Register to comment.