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Toyota Corolla

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Comments

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,692
    you can order manuals at the dealer parts department or on-line for all Toyotas. Expect to pay around $40.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,692
    buy from an outside source - my friend has a really good Alpine in his which was only around $300 including the install. The Toyota CD player available at the time was no great shakes and will cost more than that. The dealer will only install the stock Toyota stereo, not an aftermarket system.

    The only advantage of buying the Toyota system and having it installed at the dealer is a 1-year warranty on parts and labor.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • I just recently bought a 2006 Corolla. Can someone tell me where i can get a comprehensive repair manual for my car, something like the Khilton Manual (i think) ? Thanks.
  • beernutbeernut Posts: 329
    You probably mean Chilton. I like Haynes manuals better. Any big parts outlet, like Advanced Auto, should carry one or the other.
  • I've bought my first Toyota recetly (06 Corolla) and just noticed yesterday that the front driver and passenger doors never actually lock from the inside. When you lock the doors, you can still open them by pulling on the latch, even while the car is in motion. This is not true for the back two doors, however. I've never owned a car that has this problem, since once you lock a door it stays locked, unless you release or pull on the unlock button. Is this a typical Toyota issue ?
  • beernutbeernut Posts: 329
    Hmmm. I've never owned a car that works other than the way you describe your 06 to work - and that includes foriegn and domestic cars and trucks since the mid 1970's. I'd say its not an "issue" at all.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,692
    older Japanese cars did not do this, so it may have taken you by surprise, but in fact, it mimics something the domestics have been doing for a very long time. As such, it is by design, not a flaw in your Toyota. It is so that if you want to exit the vehicle quickly, you don't have to tug on the lock first, but can just reach for the handle.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • Hmmm. I've never owned a car that works other than the way you describe your 06 to work - and that includes foriegn and domestic cars and trucks since the mid 1970's.

    I don't about that. My previous car was a 2002 Maxima, and i know for a fact you can't open the locked doors by just pulling on the latch in the front two seats. You have to unlock the door first, and then pull the latch ! To me pulling the latch to open makes the lock superfluous, whats the point of it, if it doesn't lock. Also, i was more concerned about kids who play around with the latch and door opens suddenly, while the car is in motion.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,692
    "Also, i was more concerned about kids who play around with the latch and door opens suddenly, while the car is in motion."

    You should keep kids in the back seat to avoid this - the back doors also have the child locks.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • beernutbeernut Posts: 329
    I assure you that none of the cars/trucks I have owned ever did that. My '05 Corolla, like your '06, does not do it. I have never owned a Nissan, but I think my sister had an early 70's Ford that might have been that way.

    As to your question about the point of door locks, I've always assumed they were to a) keep people out and b) keep kids in the back seat, as with child-locks, etc.

    Interestingly, six generations of car designers didn't pick up on your observation that this was a superfluous arrangement.
  • I have posted a similar message on the VW forum. Here is my dilemma. I am preparing to begin a daily commute of 200 miles round trip. Obviously fuel mileage is a huge concern but also am interested in dependability and longevity. I am looking at the Corolla and the VW jetta tdi. Mileage appears to be in the VW column, dependability in Toyota column. MSRP, Toyota = $17500, VW = $24,000. Now for the longevity issue, how many miles will a Corolla conceivably carry me with proper maintenance and 95% highway miles? Please share your experiences.
  • beernutbeernut Posts: 329
    If you are serious about "proper maintenance", either car should go 200k+. I would get the Corolla (better ride and more room, I think) and use Mobil 1 changed at 10,000.

    One caution - as Consumer Reports correctly observed, the Corolla's steering wheel is a little too far away and is noticeable on long drives, like maybe 200 miles.
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,668
    No doubt the Toyota will be much more reliable. How many miles per gallon better does the VW get? Because the selling price difference of $6,500 is about 3,000 gallons of gas at $2.15/gallon. There is no way the VW will be able to make up that difference in gasoline savings, unless it got like 20 mpg better. I'm roughly estimating here, but I am sure accurate calculations would prove that the higher selling price would be very difficult to overcome with gasoline savings. Yes, if gas costs really skyrocket, then it would narrow this, but still, very unlikely that the higher selling price would overcome the gas savings. Not to mention the VW's repair costs would be higher. If you like that fun, responsive (whatever) feel of VW, fine, but if your looking for getting from point A to B cheaply and reliably, Toyota all the way.
  • If you figure fuel mileage only, the VW will never make up the difference in initial cost. Jetta is estimated at 42 mpg hwy. Many of the Jetta owners have shared with me that considering the type of driving that I will be doing, 45 - 50 mpg would not be too far fetched. My reasoning is, if the Corolla will give me trouble free service for 4 years (200,000 mi)and the diesel will give me the same service for 5 years (250,000 mi.)then it becomes a more even playing field when you figure cost per mile. I do not however want to have my means of transportation sitting in a service dept., hence my interest in the Corolla.
  • beernutbeernut Posts: 329
    Also consider increased dental bills. A quarter of a million miles in a Jetta is sure to fracture a couple of molars.
  • bporter1bporter1 Posts: 229
    Personally I would buy the Corolla over the VW any day. I do not own either of these cars, but my mother owns an '04 Corolla. I have driven it a couple of times, and was very impressed with the gas mileage, and the overall feel of the car. My sister swears by VW though. All in all in terms of reliabilty and longeveity the Toyota would win out.
  • sandman46sandman46 Posts: 1,798
    Go with the Civic, a much better and nicer car than the Corolla. After owning 2 Corolla's and 2 Camry's with their mushy and non linear brake feel, no more Toyota's for this family ever again. For the price I paid for my Sentra, just the better brakes justified the purchase. I will, however, be buying the Civic next time...no doubt about it. And the new generation is really awesome, just blows the current Corolla out of the water. And with Toyotas bland models these past many years, I expect no competition from the next generation Corolla!

    The Sandman ;)
  • It is a no brainer, go with the Corolla. VW products (especially those built in Mexico) have had numerous and troublesome electrical problems. The older a VW gets, the more problems. Corollas will give you 200K easily and they are very reliable over the long haul.
  • Hi last night on my way to work i dropped down the windows on my 1997 Corolla when i tried to roll em back up then didnt budge the locks didnt work either, i have no idea if it blew a fuse or i actually have to take it in to a shop or not; any feedback will be much appreciated
  • tundradudetundradude Posts: 588
    I hope my 95 Corolla gets 300K or more. Its got 189 on it now.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    My girlfriend's 2004 Corolla LE does it. I drove it yesterday. The locks caught me off guard, luckily I was fiddling with it in the parking lot, not at 70 MPH. I drive Hondas, and NONE of their locks, from the Accord to the S2000 behave this way, and I'm glad.
  • barnee61barnee61 Posts: 67
    I just picked up a 2006 Corolla CE this week. Preferences for the power locks are programmable, at least 4 different configurations. The procedures are in the Owner's Manual. I assume this is probably the case on previous year models as well. If you don't have the manual, the local dealer could probably do it for you pretty quickly.
  • run347run347 Posts: 2
    I am looking at buying a used 2000 Corolla from a private party. It has 130k miles on it. The owners are selling it for $2500 because for the last 10,000 miles they have been putting in a ton of oil all the time. They also think that the engine will need to be replaced fairly soon. Are they crazy? Or is this just a simple oil leak that can be fixed easily? How much would it cost? Also how many more miles can I expect to get from this Corolla?
  • Karen_CMKaren_CM Posts: 5,018
    A large local newspaper is looking to interview consumers who purchased a Lexus, Toyota or Scion vehicle and what led you to purchase that vehicle. Please send an e-mail to ctalati@edmunds.com no later than Wednesday, April 5, 2006 containing your daytime contact information, along with the make and model your vehicle.

    Thanks,
    Chintan Talati
    Corporate Communications
    Edmunds.com

    Community Manager If you have any questions or concerns about the Forums, send me an email, karen@edmunds.com, or click on my screen name to send a personal message.

  • poliva2poliva2 Posts: 25
    I just traded in my 1999 Corolla for a 2006 Corolla. This by far has to be the best desision i ever made. I love this car. Not only is it beautiful to look at, but it is a pleasure to drive. Its a little noisy, But im still breaking it in. I see a LOT of Hondas on the road. I could easily think to my self, I should of bought a Honda, But this is not the case. Honda is everywhere. There is even a Honda Magazine. Toyota has nothing to prove. They are just hanging low, Knowing that they are the King of reliability. Thanks Toyota... I will never turn back
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,668
    I agree with you. I have a '99 LE 5 speed manual with 83,000 miles, ultra reliable, and very easy to preform the routine maintenance. How was your '99? Any issues? How many miles?
  • jpgavin1jpgavin1 Posts: 3
    The 4 cylinder Toyota's are hard to beat for reliability.
    Does anyone know if I can fit 185/75 14 tires on my 02 Corolla?
    Stock is 175 or 185/65
    I got a deal on these tires.
  • poliva2poliva2 Posts: 25
    I loved my 99 Corolla. i just thought it was time to update it. I had no issues with it. It had 47000 Miles on it and I got $4000 for it. My new Corolla is just dying to go above 55 MPH, But i was told to drive it like my Grandma would for the first 1000 Miles. My question is, Is Honda as good as all these Auto Magazines praise it to Be?? Just curious.. Thanks
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,668
    The Auto Magazines are into performance, sporty cars. Because Honda designs their cars more for performance, etc. than comfort, etc., that is why the auto magazines are into them, and that is why you read here how Honda is the best, etc. The people that post here are more the auto magazine crowd that likes the sportiness, and they tend to be very vocal.

    However, Toyota is still by far the sales leader, and the most successful company, so that means to me that they are building what most people want, which is less towards the performance side.

    Oops, strayed from the topic. Congrats on the new Corolla. I know you will like it even more than the '99.
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