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Hyundai Elantra 2001-2006

1236237239241242272

Comments

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,685
    Just remember CarFax only can report whats been reported to it. It may have been in a serious accident and never been reported in such a way as to appear on a CarFax report.

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    Thanks for your help. Not exactly what I wanted to hear, but I appreciate it.
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    I would take it to a good body/frame shop for an inspection. If they determine there is suspension/frame damage, check with your state offices to see if the car can be returned for sale with concealed damage. If the car was bought from an original owner or dealer, you have a strong case.

    Then again, the inspection may just find a bad spring. Fix it and drive happy!

    Jim
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    That's something I've never understood. Where does CarFax get their data?
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    That's a good idea. Thanks!
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,685
    My understanding is that they get data from mechanics voluntarily providing what they did. Plus from accidents reports from city and state governments.

    From their website:

    "Our unique database contains more than four billion records. We receive information from thousands of public and private sources including all Departments of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) in the United States and Canada, as well as many vehicle inspection stations, auto auctions, fleet management and rental agencies, automobile manufacturers, and fire and police departments."

    They also state:

    "While we'll never know everything about a particular car..."

    The sign said "No shoes, no shirt, no service", it didn't say anything about no pants.

  • gary045gary045 Posts: 81
    I would first make sure all the tires are the same size.
    Then I'd park it on a level surface and get a tape measure and check the distance from the ground to the top fender lip.
    If the passenger side is an inch lower I'd say the previous owner had a 400 lb wife and the spring is sagging/warn out.

    Or it was in an accident.
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    Thanks. I hope it was the first. I did measure it and it is about an inch. It doesn't look like any new parts have been put on. The wear seems pretty consistent. Same number of dings and wear on the tires, unless it got hit leaving the lot.
  • tsgeiseltsgeisel Posts: 352
    The manual says 7500 miles, people I've talked to have said anywhere between 3k and 5k.

    Right now I'm up to 1000 miles, and I'm curious as to how much longer I'll have before I have to worry about this.

    (For the record - I'm in California, mostly over flat roads, and not huge amounts of stop and go traffic. Moderate city and freeway driving.)
  • jlflemmonsjlflemmons Posts: 2,240
    My opinion: If you are doing varied highway and city driving, go with a good quality motor oil (my preference is Castrol GTX 10W30) and 5K oil changes. I have done this for over 30 years in V8's, V6's, and four cylinder engines and have never had an oil related failure in an engine.

    In my case, I drive 50+ miles a day in stop and go traffic. I change the oil every 3K miles. I wouldn't consider a 7.5K oil change for anything other than pure highway driving, and even then I don't think the cost of an extra oil change a year is worth the risk.

    Jim
  • doohickiedoohickie Posts: 949
    I did my first oil change at 2k, my second at 5k, and I'm trying to settle into the "severe usage" schedule of 3750. When I change I use dino oil, but I've gotten a couple changes at dealers and they always put in synthetic even thougth I've never asked for it (including the first oil change the dealer gave me for free). I have to admit that when changing synth oil at the same interval as dino, it appears much cleaner, still honey-colored.
  • phild01phild01 Posts: 1
    I have the same problem with a 2004 Pacifica. People are telling me it's weather related. If it was there would be loads of cars with similar problems. Had dealer look at it and he said it was normal. Will take pictures next time to show same year with clear headlights.
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    I'm starting to think it may be quality control issue. I've looked underneath, and it definitely looks like no new parts were put in from a wreck. It' also handles really well, so if it's mechanical, you would think you would notice. A couple of people have said the "springs" may be bad. It seems the most logical answer. I took it in the shop today just to find out. I just have to know. I'll let you know what they say. What was the logic behind it being weather related?
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    The other possibility is that there was some suspension damage that is difficult to spot, and it has not been repaired yet. My wife did a number on our '04 Elantra GT this winter, running into a curb in a snowstorm. About $1000 damage. I could tell a wheel was shredded, but who knows if I would have noticed all the other damaged parts that were replaced--some of those they didn't even know about until they starting working on it.
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    I just heard back from my shop. They found a damaged strut as the reason. Have you had that checked?
  • 1racefan1racefan Posts: 932
    If you wouldn't mind sharing, I would like to know what a strut replacement costs these days.
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    Absolutely. It's about $390. the struts were about $170. Labor about $150 + the cost of alignment. I hope that's not too much of a sticker shock. I've had my car all of 3 weeks and got this bill. The mechanic told me it's really a common problem with pot holes. If it weren't for the slight lean, I wouldn't have guessed. It really wasn't a handling problem up until now.
  • doohickiedoohickie Posts: 949
    That seems a little high for struts, but not outrageously so. My most recent experience was with my Escort a couple years ago, and we had front struts and 4 new tires put on for about $600... I think it was about half for the struts and half for the tires memory serves.

    My son just hit a rock in the road last week, blew out one of those tires and slid into a guardrail. The damages this time were about $400.... $200 for a new half-shaft (boot got torn up and they don't replace just the boot), $110 for bent tie rod, plus an alignment. I had to buy a new rim at a junk yard, cuz the old one was pretty bent up between the rock and the guard rail. The tire was remounted and balanced under my road hazard warranty for free (it was still good).
  • 1racefan1racefan Posts: 932
    I know someone that had new front struts put on a Buick a year or so ago. I want to say he paid in the neighborhood of $750 for these at the time.

    I thought that sounded high at the time, so that's why I was curious what the replacement of the Elantra strut ran.
  • briggerbrigger Posts: 14
    Did they get shocks at the same time? or maybe with it just being a bigger vehicle, more was involved. An Elantra is a pretty simple car.
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