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Toyota Echo

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Comments

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    Nippononly Ive read your posts in the Yaris section! Sounds to me like you are going to be driving a Yaris sooner than later! Well if you do keep your ear to the ground about the possibility of a diesel Yaris. I know it isnt going to happen. The reason is Toyota has bamboozled Americans into thinking a hybrid is a viable vehicle (which it most surely is NOT) A diesel Yaris would prove it beyond all doubt!
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    so I got the car back from the servicing today, and it uses iridium plugs! Pricey - that was $105 including parts and labor - my fault for being lazy and not doing it myself.

    Fresh coolant cost me $49.95. So, not too bad, and that is the last I intend to do except oil changes and tire rotations until 90K. Besides, it is dangerous for me going over there - I keep hanging around the Yaris's! I can't wait to see the hatch - apparently dealers are getting their first ones next week. :-)

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    If you got an oil change, sparkplug change, and a coolant change at the Toyota dealer for $105 you did pretty good. I was thinking like $400. (although the parts I did mine with last year cost less than $20 and that included genuine Toyota coolant for $12...thankyou Pep Boys!)
    I wonder what year your ECHO is though. My 2001 came with regular plugs (.89 cents each) and the owners manual says change every 30k miles. Maybe the newer ones get iridium plugs. I would still remove and clean the threads every couple of years though.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    Mine is an '02, and the plugs they removed were iridium, so that is what they put in as replacements. Supposedly I don't need to change them again for pretty much the life of the car. :-P

    Knowing me, I will almost certainly have sold my Echo before another 100K miles rolls off the odo, so I will only ever have to do that once. HOWEVER, had I know they were iridiums, I probably would have opted to just leave them in there, as those are supposed to be 100K-mile plugs. The maintenance schedule is written for Echos that have the $0.89 plugs like yours. It calls for replacement every 30K to maintain the emissions warranty.

    Anyway, that's done. And no, it was not $105, the plug replacement by itself was $105. The total was just shy of $200, including the fluid changes you mentioned and checking tires, other fluids, and belts, and greasing my very loud, very cranky front door hinges on both sides of the car. Now they are silent, and I like the car that much more for it. :-)

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    so the last time I filled up, I thought the mileage was too good to be true (41.5 mpg), and tonight's fill-up confirmed that last time the pump must have stopped too soon, as the average came out to 37 tonight.

    Assuming it was full tonight (which it looked to be on the gauge - above the 'F'), I guess that gives a running average of 39.25 mpg over the last 750 miles. Not too bad. And I wonder if the maintenance service it had during this tank reduced the mileage at all. I guess they probably don't spend too much time just idling the engine, do they? So probably not.

    I am waiting for the oil companies to switch over to the summer gas - I know we have it in California, but I have never really paid attention to the date of its arrival. I am wondering if I can eke out an extra point then, and achieve a solid 40+ mpg during the summer months.

    Meanwhile, it could be my imagination, but it seems to be starting a little easier, especially when cold, with the new plugs. It fires up with pretty much no cranking at all.

    Alas, I am returning to my former speedy ways - raced a kid with a BMW 318 up the freeway on-ramp tonight just for the fun of it (I won, he looked surprised :-)) - there's no substitute for light weight, none, and third gear in this car just goes on and on. But if I allow those bad habits to return, I am never going to be able to nudge the running average over 40 mpg! :blush:

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    Is that 40 mpg in fifth gear on the freeway, or driving in local traffic?
    On the garden State Parkway (which is six lanes in spots) my little ECHO cruises in the left lane with the BMWs, Audis, and sports cars. I go about 80, pulling over for faster cars, but passing on the right and weaving in and out of traffic to get around slower cars. Once a Saab I believe, refused to either pull over or let me pass. He sped up as I sped up. So I put my foot on the floor until he dropped back. When I could take my eyes off the road and looked at the speedo, it said 106! I once beat some kind of sports car to a spot to pass when we both saw it at the same time. I cut him off and he had to drop back in traffic and never caught up. The ECHO got there faster! The ECHO is a wonderfull car for this kind of game.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    is my current average, a running average in all suburban driving. I have almost no stop-and-go in my commute, which is short (about 5 miles) anyway. The running average floats up and down in the 39-39.5 mpg range. This car is very consistent about delivering the goods when it comes to excellent fuel efficiency - each tank of gas falls within about a point of the running average.

    Can I make the 40 mpg running average on summer gas? I dunno. Once the real heat starts, I am not one to spare the A/C, so any improvement from the summer gas may be offset by increased A/C useage. But several people posted here that they get better mpg in summer than in winter.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    How fast do you go? I have a 6.5 mile commute with about a dozen or so lights. I go 45 mph top speed with stretches of 25-35.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    is freeway - I live near the freeway, and my office is just off the freeway. The pace is 60-65 mph at the hour I go to work.

    We have some shaded parking at work, so if I get a shady spot I won't necessarily run the A/C in the afternoon or when I go out to lunch, but I am not usually that lucky.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • babyboomerbabyboomer Posts: 205
    So what are the performance differences between winter and summer gasoline formulations?

    All I found was this:

    EPA proposes easing gasoline formulation

    Jan 1, 2002 12:00 PM

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to make it easier for tank terminal operators to make the transition from winter- to summer-grade reformulated gasoline (RFG). This action will require tank terminals to accept only summer-grade RFG beginning April 15 of each year. Currently, there is not a specific date that terminals must begin receiving summer-grade RFG. However, tanks at terminals must contain only summer-grade RFG by May 1.

    Terminal operators typically draw down their levels of winter-grade gasoline as May 1 approaches, causing an abrupt reduction in gasoline inventories. This proposal would increase the amount of time terminals have to make the changeover from winter- to summer-grade RFG. The proposal also requests comments on a number of transition alternatives associated with the RFG program. The proposal is available at www.epa.gov/otaq/rfg.htm.
  • Karen_CMKaren_CM Posts: 5,018
    A large local newspaper is looking to interview consumers who purchased a Lexus, Toyota or Scion vehicle and what led you to purchase that vehicle. Please send an e-mail to ctalati@edmunds.com no later than Wednesday, April 5, 2006 containing your daytime contact information, along with the make and model your vehicle.

    Thanks,
    Chintan Talati
    Corporate Communications
    Edmunds.com

    Community Manager If you have any questions or concerns about the Forums, send me an email, karen@edmunds.com, or click on my screen name to send a personal message.

  • babyboomerbabyboomer Posts: 205
    Charging cell phone blew fuse twice in my 2001 Echo. Why?
  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    Does your cell phone do the same thing in other cars? ie blow the fuse?
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    I charge mine without a problem in the car.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • babyboomerbabyboomer Posts: 205
    New recharging cord solved the problem.
  • bblakebblake Posts: 1
    I am interested in buying a used Toyota Echo (Sedan), but need a car that can carry a canoe on top safely. Has anyone carried a canoe(on roof rack) of their echo? Does the wind catch under it and push the car around?

    Thanks for any advice related to this.

    Bailey
  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    I have car toped canoes on my 1974 VW Beetle and 1980 Subaru Hatchback. I would not hesitate to put a canoe on top of my ECHO either. I would not however take that combination on the interstate at 75 mph. Do you have much experience cartopping a canoe?
  • echobabyechobaby Posts: 2
    Did anyone see the latest Chevy Suburban commercial? I saw it on the Bob Vila show this past weekend, hopefully this weekend they'll show the commercial again.

    There are several of the newer model Echos in the commercial. They're traveling to the left of the Suburban. Soooo adorable! I wasn't paying too much attention to the commercial because I was trying to spot the Echos. The commercial had something to do with the roominess of the Suburban and how it takes so many of the smaller cars, the Echos, to match the carrying capacity of the Suburban. I think the advertisers missed their mark. I was much more interested in the Echos than in the product they're were trying to sell. :blush:
  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    Never saw that commercial. Ironic that a gas guzzling SUV would use an ECHO as a prop!
  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    I bought my next set of tires for the ECHO at Tire Rack. Kumho 758. $29 each. I was going to do it last fall before it snowed, but we didnt get any snow at all so I left the Potenzas on.
    I was wondering what experiences others have had with their tires and whether or not you would recommend them. The Potenzas were very good on dry and wet roads. They are the WORST tires i have ever used on snow however. Truly dangerous!
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    I really like these Toyos that are on my car - great grip wet or dry (I don't drive in snow) and good handling without tire howl or anything like that.

    The model name totally escapes me right now - it is a touring tire, oh how frustrating - it is a 65,000-mile warranted tire. Wait, got it, Spectrum TPT.

    How many miles did you/will you get from the Potenzas when they are all done? I have had Potenzas in the past and never been particularly impressed with them, but they were decent for the money I thought. How come you didn't go with the same ones again?

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    Extremely poor performance in snow. Right now the tires have 32k on them and there looks to be significant tread left. Thw wear bars are a little close on the edges of some of the tire, but they are clearly legal at this point. Ill drive them until the snow flies next season. If it doesnt snow next winter Ill leave them on as long as they are legal.
    It simply isnt worth risking having an accident driving in snowy conditions with these tires. I grew up in upstate NY and have fifteen years driving experience in some of the worst winter driving you can imagine. The ECHO with these tires on it is no snowmobile! Im hoping for better with the Kumhos!
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    you don't get enough snow to invest in a dedicated set of snows? Perhaps a second set of rims also - a set of four 14" steelies can't cost that much?

    The only experience I have ever had on snow with all-season passenger radials is in my old Outback Sport, and those were Potenzas. They were terrible in the snow, little to no traction.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    We MIGHT average 10-14 days a year with snow on the roads here in NJ. There were only 2 this year. Four snow tires on rims would be well over $350. Plus I would have to put them on and off, not something I can really do. We dont get enough snow to justify it.
    My sons 93 Altima has Dunlop tires that are rated AA for traction. I try to borrow that when the snow flies. They arent snow tires but the car is a tank in 6-8 inches of snow.
    The Kumhos are marked M+S so Im hoping they will make my car do as well in snow as the Altima does.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    or....30 dollars. $29.97 to be exact. 405 miles, 9.8 gallons, which by my reckoning works out to almost exactly 41 mpg. Wow. That was a good tank. I think it pushes the running average over 40. This is amazing - all of that is around town. The Echo is something else. :-)

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    I put 5 gallons even into my ECHO today after driving 210 miles. Cost $14 yipes!
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    and gas went up another dime a gallon in between fill-ups even so!

    Tonight's fill-up: 10.0 gallons of gas, 409.4 miles. Which is another tank at 41 mpg near as I can tell. Oh, and by the way, those 10.0 gallons of gas cost me $31.30. Man am I glad I have a gas-sipper to drive around in!

    In fact, looking back over a few of my posts, the car has officially cracked the 40 mpg barrier over the last 1565 miles, with an exact running average over those miles of about 40.2 mpg.

    I am going to stop calculating it so closely now that I have had it a few months and have broken that 40-mpg threshold, but it appears that with the summer gas (and cool temps around here of late, resulting in little A/C use every day but one, when it got used a lot) I can actually achieve the 40 mpg I was hoping to get when I bought this car.

    Kinda doubt the Yaris will do quite so well - has the same engine, almost the same performance, but is pulling around 200-250 more pounds of car. I bet that combination of factors will pull the fuel economy down a point or two. Minor diff, but I might as well stick with the mpg champ for a while! :-)

    I will have to kill my CCB urge some other way. :-P

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kneisl1kneisl1 Posts: 1,689
    If anything you ought to keep on figuring out your mileage now with riseing prices. Why deprive yourself of one of the joys of ownership?
    You know how some people decorate their cars with wide chrome wheel, spoilers, and loud exhaust pipes? Im thinking of putting a sign on my car in two foot letters that reads 40 MPG.
    I wonder what the idiot who wrote the negitive Edmunds evaluation of the ECHO is paying to fill his tank these days? :P
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    I always keep a GENERAL eye on fuel economy, and I will continue to do so, but no more of this calculating it down to the last tenth. I will just maintain a running average to the nearest half mpg or so, going from memory. :-)

    Seriously, on the topic of the professional reviews, this car has been overwhelmingly cheered by its owners over the years, according to the research I did before buying. It has to have one of the highest customer satisfaction scores of any model out there. What you see is what you get, with the Echo.

    With the pros, I think what happens is they climb in the car and see that center-mount IP (every single review complains about that - same for the Scion cars and even the current Prius when that came out) and decide they don't like the car before the first five minutes are over. So then they look for things they don't like and exaggerate them in the reviews.

    But to be fair, this car does not cater to the mainstream - it's super-light in a country where people like heavy-weight - it makes them feel safe I think. It's got a tiny engine in a country where many people have more cc's in their engines than brain cells in their heads. And it's very small, in a market where any car that doesn't comfortably seat five for a non-stop drive from New York to L.A. is UNCONSCIONABLY small! :-P

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

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