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Nissan Maxima

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  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    Jtiernan,

    For what it's worth, I live in Chevy Chase DC and bought my 95 Maxima DE from VOB after shopping numerous dealers, including out of state. For the first 4 years (i.. through 1999) the service experience at VOB was superb and extremely price competitive. A new red team service manager came on board in 1999 and, perhaps coincidentally, the routine service prices seem to have gone up, although the service itself is still very good.

    A few friends and colleagues have bought from VOB and several other dealerships in the area and, in general, VOB seems to be the best choice. They seem to get to the right price without a lot of B.S. and the after purchase experience is the best of the bunch. I have heard that Passport is a dealership to avoid.

    If you can wait a few months for the 2002 model with the 3.5 liter engine upgrade, let me know and we can negotiate a two for the price of one deal!! I hear it will be available in September.

    Good luck.

    P.S. Red Flag to "happy_daniel" considering purchasing a 1995 GLE: My 1995 SE has a timing chain. If the service records for the car you are considering shows a timing belt replacement, check for other discrepancies.
  • altavistaaltavista Posts: 19
    www.maxima.org has many threads and messages on the missing fuel line protector which occurs on some 2000 and all (I think) 2001 Maximas. Basically, if you look in the driver side, rear wheel well above the tire, you will see the rubber fuel filler line that goes between the filler opening and the tank. You will also see two brackets with four holes for clips and nothing attached to it. This is where the protector should be. (If you don't see the fuel line, you have the protector.) This is currently not a recall or TSB item. However, I called Nissan NA, (1-800-NISSAN1, I think), and spoke with a very nice woman. After I explained to her that I was concerned for my occupants safety - having rocks and road debris pummell the fuel line contiunously and that I was concerned about fuel contamination - lack of the protector allows dirt to enter the fuel filler area (that's how the mud gets in there), she said Nissan would "good faith" me the parts. I'm scheduled to have them installed tomorrow at no charge. In Nissan's defense (however weak), a technical engineer said they modified the fuel line to be non-corrosive. I told them I'd prefer not to bet on 100K miles of road debris continuously smashing a fuel line with my life. They agreed. The parts retail for less than $20 and take minutes to snap in.

    Mechanical engineer or not and in the manual or not, you still can't believe everthing you read. I say the break-in period is bogus. Some owner's guides recommend changing oil every 10K miles - would you listen to that? I've never heard or read about a problem attributed to improper break-in - has anyone? Could you image the manufacturer putting something this "critical" in the hands of the consumer? Millions of consumers? Please. The break-in period is so a new owner can get adjusted to the car and not hurt themselves or others.

    The under invoice prices mentioned above are very good. I bought my car at VOB, too. The price was several hundred dollars under invoice, no doc. fee and the salesman and finance guy were excellent - no pressure on warranty, no funny business with interest rates - 3.9% was nice. The service team has been equally good for the TSB and now the fuel protector.

    And of course, as each month goes by, Maximas (almost all cars) will cost less. We're heading into a recession, interest rates are dropping, a new model year is coming out, Nissan has updated the Altima...

    If you need a car, you already know you can't beat the Maxima - don't worry about another $500. Just leave off the 6-disk CD changer until later.

    Has anyone noticed how the Maxima looks a lot like the LS300/400/430's? Nice company to keep.

    Ed A. a.k.a. Altavista
    2001 Maxima SE, Black on Black, 5-speed
  • opimaxopimax Posts: 73
    and by far the best deal at the time, more than a 1000 less than any other local dealer. It did involve a screwed up trade in, but by far the best price. Not the most pleasant (ok it down right sucked) sales experience and until last service really , really bad service. Notice until LAST service experience. New dealership manager, service manager and service writers, a very positive experience, hope it continues. Anyway I would put up w/the poor sales stuff to save over a grand and with service getting better, at least worth a trip there if you made it as far as VOB.

    Ed, I have to disagree w/you about who the break-in period is for, in my opinion any new pieces of metal rubbing should be done slowly, engine parts, wheels, bearings, brakes (semi-metallic pads and rotors, etc. and your car runs really nice , I am jealous!

    Mark A
  • Well gang, I just had my fuel line protector installed and it took all of 10 mins. After 300 miles there is not a drop of sand in the filler door. What a difference. if anyone is looking for the part numbers they are as follows,

    Part #: 74844P (1 Piece – Fuel line cover thing)
    Part #: 74305F (4 Pieces – Plastic screw/retainer things)
    INV#RD(not sure if "D" "O" OR "O")47654
    NI01553-09321 CLIP

    NI17290-2Y000 PROTECTOR-FILLE

    Part #: 74844P (1 Piece – Fuel line cover thing)
    Part #: 74305F (4 Pieces – Plastic screw/retainer things)
  • maxamillion1maxamillion1 Posts: 1,467
    I was wondering if the anyone knew what the name of the mint-looking green color on the 97-99 Maximas was called, was it Sage Mist?
    Thanks in advance,
    Reg
  • ddssdd1ddssdd1 Posts: 2
    Has premium gas been a requirement for all Maxima's over the past decade? Are there older models that didn't require premium gas? Thank you!
  • 92drexel92drexel Posts: 153
    ddssdd:

    All of the 3rd generation maximas from 89-91 and the max GXE's only from 92-94 have the 160 HP SOHC engine which don't require premium. I know that the 95-2001 all require premium. Not sure about the 92-94 SE model (these have 190 HP).

    I burn regular in my 92 GXE in the winter and mid-grade in the summer.

    Hope this helps...
  • ddssdd1ddssdd1 Posts: 2
    Thanks again, I appreciate it!
  • 427435427435 Posts: 86
    I've got a car that wasn't broken in correctly---that is the speed and load on the engine wasn't varied. This happened because the dealer found the car I wanted 300 miles away and he traded one of his inventory for it. Had a guy drive it back on the interstate and I'm sure he just put it on cruise and drove. Oil consumption has been twice what it has been on other new cars that I've driven the first few hundred miles. There are also lots of bearings in the engine, transmission, final drive, wheels etc. that will last much longer if loads are light for the first few hundred miles.
  • 427435427435 Posts: 86
    I'm checking this board as I have a son interested in buying a new Maxima. I note on Nissan's board that the Altima is getting a 220hp V-6 next year and new styling. Anyone have any info on what Nissan is planning to do to keep the Maxima ahead of an Altima? The Maxima's body could use a redo also. When is the next body scheduled?
  • majohnsmajohns Posts: 16
    The 2002 Altima is goping to 240 and the Maxima is going to 260. As far as body change--the Max is not dated--it got a full redesign for 2000. It's probably going to be a full-size for 2003.
  • robertrrobertr Posts: 125
    I keep hearing the Maxima is going to be "Full-size", but what does "full-size" mean? The Maxima is 190.5" long now (which I think is big enough). The Toyota Avalon is 191.9"-very little difference. So will the Maxima increase by an inch or grow to over 200" (way too big) like a Chevy Impala or Dodge Intrepid?

    As as 2000 Max SE owner (my second Maxima), I don't like the idea of buying a $15,000 4-cyl and adding $10,000+ worth of options. I hope they don't make the Max too big. If they do, I hope the 2003 Infiniti XVL is a desirable option.
  • qx4qx4 Posts: 99
    read post 2092
    and i'm sure the moderator will be more than happy to refer you to some refrence material regarding break-in period.

    mechanical engineer or not the car needs to break in. design a component and put it in an assembly and you'll understand.

    i'm not hear to start argument. you stated your opinion and i stated mine. i'm not changing my opinion and you probably won't change yours. so let the others interput it the way they like to.

    moving on to a new subject.
  • tuhlertuhler Posts: 6
    I am planning on buying a 2001 Maxima SE soon. I'm waiting for my wife's Honda to sell. I just got off the phone with a dealer in Seattle,WA. He is telling me that I can't get a Maxima for the TMV price here on Edmunds. He says that it isn't good business to sell a car for under invoice. I have a dealer lined up to give me the car for the TMV price. What is your guys' take on this? He also said that Nissan is currently offering 3.9% finacing (which we all knew), but that they are also offering $1000 cash back. Has anyone else heard this? Thanks.
  • silvercrownsilvercrown Posts: 237
    I was wondering when the Maxima was due for an exterior redesign. Let me make sure I got this straight: for 2002, it will get an upgraded engine with 260hp but no exterior body redesign until 2003? At which time, the body will be bigger, no longer in the mid-size category? Is this correct?

    I guess if the Altima is being redesigned and getting more hp, then they have to do something to distinguish the Max for the higher price. I like the all of the features that the Maxima offers, it sounds like a great car on paper, although I haven't driven one yet to experience it firsthand. I'm just not wild about the current exterior styling which is why I'm curious about when the next redesign is planned. I don't think it looks anything like the LS400 or the new LS430 which are both beautiful cars. But that's my opinion. To each his own, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, I guess.
  • 92drexel92drexel Posts: 153
    I think the size classes refers to the interior volume, not the wheelbase. Hopefully the max's wheelbase will not grow too much to facilitate the increase in interior size (I'm with you on that one).

    The folks at www.freshalloy.com are speculating that the 2002 max, in addition to the 260HP engine, will get HID headlights, 6-speed manny tranny, 6 disc in-dash changer, optional navigation system (maybe), etc. This doesn't surprise me since all of these options are/will be offered on other Nissan products in 2002.

    Also, I'm hearing that the 2002 may be THE max to get since it'll have the same engine as the bigger (hence heavier 2003 max). Interesting. If Nissan keeps the price right and offers these options, then the 2002 max will compete nicely with TL's, TL-S', and GS300's of the world.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    I'm curiously awaiting for the 2002 Maxima with the upgraded engine to arrive, since I've postponed my next car purchase to at least October. However, I'm curious to what others think about all of these increased horsepower ratings of the last couple of years without significant performance increases. On a pure seat of the pants basis, my 1995 Maxima SE 5-speed with 190 h.p feels quicker than the 2000 / 2001 models with 222 h.p.. The 0-60 ratings by the various car magazines seem to bear this out. A few other examples that are difficult to reconcile:

    The Acura "S" engine with supposedly 260 horsepower is within 30 of an NSX (the original NSX only had 270 hp). If the Acura Type S, with a supposedly 70 h.p. advantage, is quicker than my 95 Maxima, the difference is very marginal. It's definately no NSX.

    Edmunds own recent test of 4 coupes puts the BMW 330ci at the head of the pack in performance in spite of the lowest horsepower rating of the bunch (beat Mercedes 275 hp V-8).

    I know vehicle weight, torque curve and a few other factors can explain some of the differences. But I really think the manufacturers are radically different in terms of the size of their "horses". BMW gets my appreciation for apparantly using Clydesdales. Most Japanese manufacturers appear to have gone to an Asian version of the Shetland.

    At 3.5 liters and 260 horsepower, the 2002 Maxima should on paper be able to run with (or outrun) the previous generation BMW M3 (240 hp). The higher output ratings of the Maxima should fully compensate for the 200 +/- lb. weight disadvantage. I'll be interested to what the real world results turn up when the car gets here.

    Any thoughts?

    P.S. Lest I give the wrong impression, in the "real world" I am not an agressive driver or drag racer. The whole horsepower rating thing just entertains me.
  • altavistaaltavista Posts: 19
    I actually, completely, agree with you that an engine has to break-in. However, the meaning of break-in and the affect that humans have on it, is where we differ in opinion - maybe.

    I do feel that many cars get a little quicker, get better mileage and shift more smoothly after some time, but I don't think drivers have much to do with it. It just doesn't make much sense.

    How can a manufacturer even offer a 10 year warranty (or a 2 year) if so much depends on the driver? With the crankshaft spinning at 3K rpm or more, what affect do I really have on my engine? It can't be much. The pistons are already moving at a blinding speed and the engine is already at a high temperature with computers monitoring vital systems. Pressing the gas too hard or not pressing it enough is going to somehow damage the car?

    If drivers played such a crucial role, the manufacturer could do several things to assist with proper "break-in";

    1) inlcude programming that didn't allow high reving, high speeds, fast shifts, etc. until 1,000 miles (or whatever the magic number is)

    2) use a computer to track the driving for the initial break-in period and void the warranty if improperly driven

    3) drive the car for 1,000 miles before sending to the dealer!

    4) monitor test-drives more closely!!!

    5) don't even get me started on fleet sales, rental or lease returns...

    And finally, what should someone do in this situation...

    Crossing an intersection with a new car, someone is heading toward you about to blow a red light, the only way out is to hit the gas hard - or definitely get hit? What do you do? Well, I guess it doesn't matter too much, either way you just damaged your car.

    Simply ridiculous.

    The first time a car engine fires up, it's more broken-in than anything we will do to it - short of not maintaining it.

    This is my opinion.
  • norbert444norbert444 Posts: 195
    Here is my 2c (or 5c, perhaps):
    The cylinders on a new car have been honed or whatever method they use to make them smooth. However, the piston rings do have a tendency to not completely fit the cylinders. Therefore they have to make so many Millions of cycles to fit themselves to a greater degree. The car manufacturers spend lots of money to figure out the number of cycles - then they approximate the mileage that the average driver needs to go to reach that number of cycles.

    Now, the harder you drive, the bigger the forces that interact between the pistons, rings and the cylinders. If they are properly seated, the forces get spread, so the wear (gouging) will be uniform and small. If they are not seated, the forces will make the parts gouge each other more! That is, in my mechanical engineer's opinion, the long and short of why break-in is important.

    My personal experience with my y2k Max has been this: Drove it as a baby the first 1000 as directed. Drove it hard (70+ mph on cruise control) for the second 1000 miles. The gas consumption: 27 mpg on the second 1000. Now (at about 10,000 miles) I have a hard time beating 21 mpg, city or highway. Ie, my gas consumption is way up!!!

    Does that mean that with today's harder surfaces, the break-in period should be more than 1000 miles? What is your take on this, guys and gals?
  • warrenulwarrenul Posts: 50
    I personally believe strongly in a break-in period. Those who don't believe in it, thats ok too.

    I read somewhere that an engine isn't truly "broken In" until about 30,000 miles, thats when your suppose to get the best mileage and most power from the engine. I think thats when I'll start using synthetic oil. Someother automotive magazine reccomended that you should't use syntheic oil until its broken in or at around 15,00 miles or so.

    I babied my Max under 50 mph for the first 1000 miles and under 65 for the next 2000 miles. But thats what I chose to do. Also I didn't want to open her up until I performed the first oil change at 3000 miles. The thought of the original oil contaminated with small minute metallic particles from the bearings seating helped me keep my regimine. Hey, Nascar engine builders all break-in their engines before going racing, so their got to be something to it. However, you do what you feel is right.. break'n it in or not.
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