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Nissan Leaf

24

Comments

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    I don't think they had anymore than that to sell did they.
  • Here are 8 things you don't know about the Nissan Leaf; pretty interesting:
    http://www.energyinyourlife.com/article.php?t=100000076
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Going to be built in the USA starting next year is good news. Thanks for the link. It would cost me about $8 to charge up at our SDG&E rates. I would have to install solar panels to justify owning one.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    without your power cord. :shades:

    image
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    edited January 2011
    That's a dumb cartoon. He can plug his laptop into his EV which is charging right there. That cartoonist is not very smart.

    It's easy (but useless) for him to make fun of something he obviously doesn't fully understand.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    I think you just missed the point. Anything with a battery is subject to die. You have to have a power source near by or you can be left out in the cold. Or in your case, out in the heat.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Gary says, "Anything with a battery is subject to die."

    That was his point? If so, then I have a message for him:

    "Thanks for the news flash, brainiac. No one knew."

    dupid.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,902
    If you live in Southern California and bought a Nissan Leaf, a reporter wants to interview you. Please reply to pr@edmunds.com by Monday, February 14 with your daytime contact information.
    Thanks,
    Jeannine Fallon
    Corporate Communications
    Edmunds.com

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? kirstie_h@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    edited April 2011
    They Likey:

    http://www.autoweek.com/article/20110414/GREEN/110419941

    Here are some recent fill-ups to give you an idea of how much the range varies depending on driving:

    -- When the car is fully charged in the morning, the range readout on the dash has read as high as 111 miles. Nissan Leaf salesman and EV advocate Paul Scott, who works at Nissan Santa Monica and owns a Leaf, says he has gone as far as 120 miles on a charge (he is a very conscientious driver).

    -- Yesterday we went 43 miles and used up 14 kilowatt-hours of battery. That was with a fair amount of A/C going. Driving as we were that day we could have continued for a total of 73.1 miles before the battery was empty.

    -- On March 30, we went 47 miles on 14 kilowatt-hours for a range of 80 miles.

    -- On March 28, we went 44.4 miles on 14 kilowatt-hours for 76.1 miles range.

    -- On April 11, we went 53.9 miles of mostly 55-mph freeway driving and used 14 kilowatt-hours, giving a potential range of 92.4 miles.

    -- On April 5, potential range was 81.2 miles; on April 1, it was 62.6.


    Then there are the operating costs. While the price of electricity varies all over the country, here in Southern California Edison territory it is about 13 cents per kilowatt-hour. That figure drops to 10 cents a kilowatt-hour if you get a separate meter and charge overnight. At 3.8 miles per kilowatt-hour, it takes one dollar to go 38 miles or $10 to go 380 miles. If a car gets 20 mpg and gasoline is $4 a gallon, operating costs for an EV work out to almost one-eighth if the cost for a gasoline-powered car. Higher electricity bills and lower gas costs will change that figure, but it's still way less expensive to operate an EV than an internal-combustion engine.

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    edited April 2011
    here in Southern California Edison territory it is about 13 cents per kilowatt-hour. That figure drops to 10 cents a kilowatt-hour if you get a separate meter and charge overnight.

    They need to run the same test in San Diego on SDG&E rates. Which are tiered with NO night rates or special EV rates. Notice Summer rates are higher than winter rates for SDG&E customers. You get to the tier 4 rate after you use 626 KWHs in a month. With taxes that 31 cents is 34 cents per KWH. If you use their 3.8 miles per KWH it comes out to .089 cents per mile. At $4 per gallon the Prius will cost you about .079 cents per mile. Just does not make any sense to own a Leaf unless you are generating your own solar electricity. That is still a debate in my mind even with a lease.

    http://sdge.com/customer/rates/tierCosts.shtml
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    edited April 2011
    Gary, if people ONLY bought things which were financially responsible, not many people would own a car...or a cell phone...or a TV.....or a second home in HI......:) :shades:

    http://publicola.com/2011/04/06/cost-of-driving-rises-another-3-4-percent/

    According to a new report from AAA, the average annual cost to own and drive a car has riven 3.4 percent in the past year, thanks largely to increases in fuel prices, depreciation, and tire prices. Overall, the cost of owning a sedan in the US rose 1.9 cents per mile last year, to 58.5 cents a mile, or or $8,776 a year for a person who drives 15,000 miles a year. Drive more, which you’ll have to if you live in a far-flung suburb, and you’ll pay more (driving an extra 5,000 miles adds another $1,083 a year); drive an SUV, and your average annual cost goes up to $11,239. That’s almost half the median personal income of US residents! The cost of tires went up the most of any factor included in the cost of driving, rising 15.7 percent to 0.96 cents per mile.Overall, the cost of owning a sedan in the US rose 1.9 cents per mile last year, to 58.5 cents a mile, or or $8,776 a year for a person who drives 15,000 miles a year.
    Moreover, the cost of driving has either increased steadily or remained essentially unchanged over the past decade, even as gas prices have fluctuated. Driving, in other words, isn’t getting any cheaper—and that isn’t even including the costs of the negative externalities associated with driving, like sprawl, poor health, pollution, highway runoff, sedentary lifestyles, social isolation, and car crashes.

    Am I optimistic that, eventually, the car warriors will realize that alternatives to driving alone aren’t just a pet project for hippie environmentalists and “social engineers” who want to force people out of their cars? Not yet, but if the cost of driving continues to skyrocket the way it has been, even the most dedicated “free market” car proponent may have to admit that driving alone no longer makes anything resembling financial sense.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Gary, if people ONLY bought things which were financially responsible, not many people would own a car...or a cell phone...or a TV.....or a second home in HI

    I agree on all but the home in Hawaii. That netted me on the sale last year enough to buy 3 Nissan Leaves. With enough left over to get a Yaris for when electricity costs more than gas to run the car. Your too eat up with every automotive fad. You need to get a grip or you will waste all your sustenance on frivolous expenditures. I suppose it is too late to warn against the Cell phone or TV? :blush:
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    What Fad?

    Hybrids? EVs?

    Hybrids = Several million sold worldwide = not a fad = stopgap technology until something better comes along.

    EVs = stopgap technology until something better comes along.
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    I have a Nissan Leaf and I have driven over 2k miles in a month. I also drive from Austin to Round Rock,Tx to get to work which is about 60 miles round trip hwy miles and I have never gotten standed or left out in the heat/cold. I am speaking as a owner of the Leaf that has been able to drive and charge it since I purchased it on March 5. I have to say this vehicle has become my primary vehicle. I use it to go and do everything and I have never felt any anxiety from driving around town or driving to the nearest city. I also have never needed to use a out side charging port to recharge my car, all I use is my home charging port and that is it. And yes a electric car needs to be charged or it will die just like a gas car that dies when it has no gas. when it comes to new cars even new cars have problems belive me I had a new car and had to take it in my first few weeks of driving it and they changes the transmission on it, so electric cars are just like anything else that is mass produced. I'm happy to say that my Leaf has not shown any sign of problems. I am one happy driver that has already saved over three hundred dollars and cant even remember the last time I went to the gas station to fill up my second car/suv.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Thank you for the review of your new car. Just out of curiosity what do you have to pay per KWH where you live? And did they install the fast charger in your garage? Is it on a separate meter or do you have night rates? All things that would make the Leaf a go or no go.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Thanks for the input. Good to know about good experiences with all the doubters around here... :shades:
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    .015kw I think I'm in Austin,Tx. I posted my electric bill on my facebook for the world to see that there was only about a $40 difference in my bill and that is with charging on and off peak hours. And in regards to installing the port I had an electriction come out and run a 210 to the front of my house and my husband built a stand for it out of a 2by4 and it looks good picture on facebook. I bought my port and they mailed it to me and all I had to do was mount it and plug it in it really was that easy. also I have no garage the port is under the roof over hang. In regards to the meter the port is digital records kw usage on a weekly,monthly and yearly basis.
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    I know those doubters do they even own a Leaf.
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    not in my case I bought the car first then purchased the port.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,376
    >.015kw I think I'm in Austin,Tx.

    I know you aren't paying 1.5 Cents per thousand watts (Kw). We'll half half the country moving to Austin if that's true!

    That probably is 15 cents per Kw?
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    YOU CAN GO TO MY FACEBOOK AND SEE MY BILL FOR YOUR SELF I BOUGHT MY LEAF ON MARCH 5 AND MY MEETER WAS READ ON MARCH 2 SO IT IS FAIRLY ACCURATE. AND I ALSO PUT LAST MONTHS FOR A COMPARISON. ON MY FACEBOOK YOU CAN SEE MY HOUSE IS ABOUT 3K SQUARE FEET AND LAST MONTH (FEB) I ONLY PAID $35 FOR ELECTRIC USE AND THIS MONTH (MARCH READING WAS ONLY $91. KEEP IN MIND I HAD FOUR OUT OF TOWN GUEST AT MY HOUSE. CAN I POST MY BILL HERE. I ALSO HAVE ALL LED LIGHTING AND A SOLOR FAN IN ATTIC AND HAVE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCES AND LINENS. AND MY HOUSE HAS STUCCO KEEPS HOUSE COOL IN SUMMER AND KEEPS THE HEAT IN WINTER.
  • live1live1 Posts: 6
    ONE OTHER THING MY HUSBAND IS A HOME BUILDER SO WHEN YOUR READY TO MOVE TO AUSTIN HE CAN BUILD YOU AN ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    edited April 2011
    You do have very cheap electric rates compared to CA. The Rate I would be paying for charging a Leaf on top of my current bill would be almost 10 times what your Austin TX rates are. Which makes a Leaf a good choice for you. Not very good in San Diego. Anything past 600 KWHs per month goes to 34 cent per KWH. CA gives lip service to saving fossil fuel and that is the extent of it.

    I used 462 KWH last month and my bill was $82.08. If I turn on the AC it goes up real fast. Same if I was charging an EV.

    http://www.austinenergy.com/about%20us/rates/rateSummary.pdf
  • redline65redline65 Posts: 693
    They need to run the same test in San Diego on SDG&E rates. Which are tiered with NO night rates or special EV rates. Notice Summer rates are higher than winter rates for SDG&E customers. You get to the tier 4 rate after you use 626 KWHs in a month. With taxes that 31 cents is 34 cents per KWH. If you use their 3.8 miles per KWH it comes out to .089 cents per mile. At $4 per gallon the Prius will cost you about .079 cents per mile. Just does not make any sense to own a Leaf unless you are generating your own solar electricity. That is still a debate in my mind even with a lease.

    But you need to factor in the maintenance and repair costs on the internal combustion engine in the Prius for a true cost per mile comparison. The LEAF has no ICE, so saying .089 cents vs .079 cents isn't really a fair comparison.

    And "ouch" on the 34 cents per KWH. In Houston our rate is around 9 cents/KWH. :)
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    And "ouch" on the 34 cents per KWH. In Houston our rate is around 9 cents/KWH.

    You got that right, ouch. I just suffer in the heat during the summer rather than run up my electric. SDG&E will give you a 5% discount if you let them hook up a device that locks out your AC during peak loads.

    Bottom line is CA talks a lot about going green and cutting fossil fuel use. They just do nothing to make it feasible.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    edited April 2011
    "But you need to factor in the maintenance and repair costs on the internal combustion engine in the Prius for a true cost per mile comparison."

    But the components that mostly fail in any car have nothing to do with the ICU...electrical components, sensors, power steering pumps, AC units, transmissions, interior components, etc.... The prius is rated by JD Powers as it's "most reliable" used compact car, but we don't yet know anything about long-term reliability for the Leaf, so we have to base it on other Nissan vehicles. A vacuum cleaner, dishwasher, clothes dryer, etc...all run just on an electric motor and folks have repair issues with those too. No ICU doesn't equal no mechanical problems.
  • redline65redline65 Posts: 693
    But the components that mostly fail in any car have nothing to do with the ICU...electrical components, sensors, power steering pumps, AC units, transmissions, interior components, etc.... The prius is rated by JD Powers as it's "most reliable" used compact car, but we don't yet know anything about long-term reliability for the Leaf, so we have to base it on other Nissan vehicles. A vacuum cleaner, dishwasher, clothes dryer, etc...all run just on an electric motor and folks have repair issues with those too. No ICU doesn't equal no mechanical problems.

    What about maintenance items associated with an ICE? They add up over the life of the car and need to be taken into account. It doesn't matter how reliable the Prius is, there are additional costs associated with maintaining an ICE. Specifically, things like:

    Oil changes
    Engine air filter
    Coolant flush
    Coolant hoses
    Coolant thermostat
    Fuel Filter
    Fuel injector & throttle body cleaning
    PCV Valve
    Spark Plugs
    Engine drive belts
    Timing belts

    Not sure about transmission, does the LEAF have some sort of fluid-filled transmission that requires servicing as well?
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    True but there's a difference between maintenance and repairs. One big repair job will cost a lot more than a bunch of routine maintenance items, especially in today's ICE that require little if any maintenance prior to 100,000 miles except for an oil change.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,053
    Nissan Motor Co. says it is conducting a service campaign on 5,300 Nissan Leaf electric cars in the North American, Japanese and European markets to fix a potential software flaw that could keep the vehicles from restarting after they are turned off.

    http://blogs.wsj.com/drivers-seat/2011/04/18/nissan-to-fix-5300-leaf-electric-ca- rs/
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