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Isuzu Owners Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Well my grinding was in fact the rear pads. One pad was down to the metal and digging into the rotor. :( So now I will probably wind up buying new rear rotors if they aren't too expensive as well as pads. It was nice to use my Sears electric impact wrench and just took me about 1hr to get the tire off pull the pads, caliper and rotor and put them all back and clean up!

    -mike
  • savvas_esavvas_e Posts: 347
    Mike,

    If you are getting new rotors, you should investigate getting slotted rotors. I have a friend who put these in his Landcruiser, and the difference in stopping power and resistance to fade is amazing. He did all 4 though, and the cost was the same as the OE rotors.

    Don't know what there is available in the US, but have a look at www.dba.com.au to see what I'm talking about.

    Interesting that the wear indicators didn't sound. Are these just on the front brakes?
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    if possible. Replacements are like $150 each for OEM ones.

    -mike
  • cwmosercwmoser Posts: 227
    I went to the local discount tire shop and got some quotes on tires. How are these prices for tires?

    Bridgestone Dueler H/L $122
    Michelen LTX $155

    both were 265-70-16 and the price did not include sales tax or disposal fee of old tires.
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    I got them to come down further by referring to tirerack prices. $130 Dueler A/T's to $105 installed (valve stem and balance extra). Compared to Tire Rack $91 + $8 shipping per tire + $7 charge to mount + Valve stem and Balance, it was about break even.

    You could definitely get them to go lower.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Mounting and balancing? If so they are very good IMHO. Although I'm comparing them to ATs not HTs.

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Wow I thought I was getting a bargain @ $10/tire @ Costco. Around here aluminum wheels cost $17/tire to mount and balance.

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I hear they are about $145 each so I'm gonna probably get the ones I have turned and get some replacement pads from St. Charles.

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Just ordered my pads from st. charles. $99 for all 4 corners + $12 shipping since I wanted them overnight. Not too bad considering that the pads are OEMs and the rears lasted 40K miles, and the fronts are still going strong at 40K.

    -mike
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    $7 to mount + valve stem and balancing. About $17 altogether. $3 valve stem, $3 balance weight, $4 balance labor.

    With the $105 a tire, I got the mounting fee included, because I bought the tire from them. If I had gotten from Tirerack, I would have also had to pay $7 on top of valve stem and balance.

    I went to a Firestone shop. They were willing to match prices, without much haggling. There is obviously a decent amount in profit, because they dropped the price $25 without much effort.
  • cwmosercwmoser Posts: 227
    Stopped at the local Sams to get a quote on some tires. They recommended the Michlen LT's at $600 total price for 4 tires for 265x70x16. When the salesman check his guidelines, he said that he could not install that size on my Trooper. He said the tire would be no wider, just taller. Is this true?

    What I am looking for is a tire size that is wider and approximately the same height. This ratio of height to width is confusing.
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    I got 265/70R16 Bridgestone Dueler's from a Firestone place. No hassle, no papers to sign about not going with a non-standard size. They told me that the recommended size is 245/70R16...but we also talked about the 265/65 which is the LT series...this guy wanted my business and was happy to help.

    The 265/70R16 on my increased the ride height by about 5/8 of an inch and the width about the same. If you go to the Bridgestone site, they have a chart that not only includes tire diameters, but also the loaded radius, which is significantly less than 1/2 the diameter. That is a good way to judge height increases. You should check the tire sites, each tire has different widths, since the 265 is one edge of the tread to another, if there is a wrap around of tread, the width of tread is much more than width of tire. Once again read the tire sites, look at the tires in person and bring a flexible tape measure.

    I think 265/70 is a really cool size, and makes the truck look really good. As soon as I get mine back from the shop...(ugh, 3 weeks so far this month on the same problem, I am not going to swear at them until the problem is fixed, but after that they will get an earful)...I will take some shots and get them on the web.
  • savvas_esavvas_e Posts: 347
    Unfortunately you can't get exactly the same height but wider on a 16" Trooper rim. The standard 245/70 could in theory be the same height as a 265/65, but the latter simply doesn't seem to exist in an A/T type tyre. Probably for good reason.

    Simple way to work it out is that the sidewall height on a 245/70 is 70% of 245mm, or 171.5mm. A 255/70 would be 70% of 255, or 178.5mm. Therefore the difference in sidewall height would be 7mm. Double this to get the difference in overall diameter. This is general guide only, and even same size tyres in different brands and models will have slight variations.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I have to add this to the Isuzu-suvs.com page


    http://www.miata.net/garage/tirecalc.html


    Best calculator out there.


    -mike

  • cwmosercwmoser Posts: 227
    Regarding how to decipher a tyre say 245x70x16, is the "sidewall" parameter the width from sidewall to sidewall? In other words, a rough approximation of the tread width?
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    No sidewall is the height from the edge of the rim to the ground.

    245 = width of tire
    70 = 245*.70 = height of sidewall
    16 = diameter of the rim

    Overall height of tire = 16+(70*245)(conversion of mm to inches)

    -mike
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    Paisan is correct regarding the numbers and what they mean. However the calculation is diameter, and by comparing diameters you can pretty much judge how much higher one tire will be over the other, but the actual height of the tire.

    Loaded radius is different, a 245/70R16 height, from the ground up is less. The bottom radius is something like 13.2", while the top radius is 14.75" for a height of 27.95", where the actual diameter is roughly 29.5". Again, you can find loaded radius measurements at a lot of tire web sites.

    Comparing diameter to diameter is pretty good to roughly figure out how much taller a tire is, but not necessarily what will fit...for example, I was very afraid that a 265/75 wouldn't fit because its diameter is 31.6", however its actual height is only 30.5".
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Yep it's easier to compare tire to tire via the diameter because the loaded height will vary depending on load, and some manufacturers don't have the loaded height available.

    265-75 would definitely fit w/o rubbing there are TONS of people running them.

    -mike
  • bluedevilsbluedevils Posts: 2,554
    In a 245/70/16 tire, the 245 is 245 millimeters. This is the width of the tire. The 70 means that the sidewall height is 70% of the width. E.g. 245 mm x 70% 171.5 mm. The 16 is diameter, in inches.
  • cwmosercwmoser Posts: 227
    Any opinions on 255x65x16 tires for a 1999 Trooper? There is a sale locally and a set of 4 Bridgestone Dueler HT's can be purchased for $340.00 installed. Is this a good price and what do you think about this size tire? The tire calculator shows not much speedometer change.

    Also, the Michelin LT's are $444/set of 4 installed.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    That puts more rubber on the road which is nice, but you'll be giving up an AT tire for an HT tire. If you don't off-road or snow drive often it shouldn't cause any issues.

    -mike
  • bluedevilsbluedevils Posts: 2,554
    a pretty good price for a fairly sporty (for an SUV) tire.
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    You shouldn't need to replace the spare either. Those are close to stock height, actually slightly less...depending on make, tread, etc. The price sounds good too. I would double check with tirerack.com, they seem to have the best prices going.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I never replace my spare even with bigger tires. Since I'd have to get the tire replaced if it is dead, it's worth the gamble IMHO.

    -mike
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    I worry about driving home on one tire that is 1/2" shorter? Especially while on vacation. I figure $100 now will save me huge if I was to wreck a tire anywhere not close to a shop that was open.

    I guess it is what you are comfortable with. On Nantucket, it would cost a lot to get a tire replaced, and could negatively impact my vacation, so for me it's worth it.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I'm usually near the interstates when I travel so it's not so much an issue. I would have no problem putting my spare on the front of my truck if I had to though. Also being single I don't have the family issues to deal with if my vacation is delayed etc.

    -mike
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    changing a tire is a last resort. I have 2 cans of fix-a-flat on me, and AAA ready. It is a real pain to change a tire on the truck, even with a hydaulic jack and stands.

    When we first got the truck, I showed my wife where the jack was, how to operate it, etc. After rotating the tires myself, I realized, she would not be capable of changing one under ideal situations, let alone the side of a road somewhere. Now I just make sure she keeps the cell phone charged.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I just did the brakes on the rear and my small floor jack that I carry in my truck barely is high enough to lift it.

    -mike
  • breakorbreakor Posts: 398
    I have had 2 tire guys tell me to only use fix-a-flat as a last resort. They told me it makes a really large mess inside the tire and is a major pain to clean out. This is especially true if left in there for any extended period of time. While I cannot confirm this from personal experience it does seem to make intuitive sense that a bunch of goo inside the tire is not a long-term good thing.

    FWIW I carry the stuff myself just in case as well as a tire pump to fully repressurize the tire. I agree that changing a tire is never an ideal option. However, I personally would always prefer to go that route first. That being said, I can envision circumstances where I would use the stuff or even drive on and damage the rim just to get out of the wrong place at the wrong time. I certainly agree that its use is ALWAYS preferable to running the risk that a loved one could get hurt while changing a tire.
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    Primarily I would be using it offroad. Even to get to a spot to then put the spare on. This would also ensure that when swapped with the spare, I would still then have at least a minimally functional spare.
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