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BMW 3-Series Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • dan12dan12 Posts: 114
    What years were your X3 and 3 Series? I get the feeling that it's better to buy a BMW later in the model cycle after they figure out all the various problems. I love my '07 335i, but I have had a few problems here and there outside of the HPFP. It hasn't cost me anything since it was all covered under warranty, but it got me worried enough to extend my warranty to 100K miles.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    I get the feeling that it's better to buy a BMW later in the model cycle after they figure out all the various problems.

    That statement holds true for any make, not just BMW...
  • rflrfl Posts: 100
    How about Spartensburg?
  • rflrfl Posts: 100
    Rule # 1 NEVER BUY A CAR WITH A TURBOCHARGED ENGINE!

    Rule # 2: Never buy or keep a BMW after the warranty (or extended warranty) runs out. They are WONDERFUL automobiles....until yu have to fix one. I have owned 11 of them...never one after the warranty period (or it's extension) as in a CPO car or two tht were part of my collection. My total cost to repair has been $0 for all eleven cars (not including tires, state inspections and oil). I have never had one longer than the warranty period and (before you think I am a total nut case) the cost to replace the car (depreciation) is generally less than the anticipated overall repair costs. And the new car smell just can't be beat.

    I went through 3 HPFPs on my 2008 335XI which caused lots of angst but NO MONEY. BMW ate the costs and, finally, the Car itself.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Hmmm, I love cars with turbocharged engines; I've already had two and am hoping my next one will have the turbo treatment as well.
  • jimbresjimbres Posts: 2,025
    NEVER BUY A CAR WITH A TURBOCHARGED ENGINE!

    Pretty much agree.

    Never buy or keep a BMW after the warranty (or extended warranty) runs out.

    Don't agree. I have an '01 330i purchased new in June of that year, which means that the factory warranty ran out in June, 2005. Never bought an extended warranty - EWs are for people who can't manage their finances, which has never been my problem.

    IOW, my car has been out of warranty for 5 1/2 years. During that time, I've had one major repair - a control arm had to be replaced at a cost of $1200. This was my fault; I wasn't paying attention & drove into the biggest pothole on the East Coast. I doubt that an EW would have paid for this in any case.

    Figure it out. The cost of keeping my 330i after the warranty ran out amounts to $18.18 per month. I spend more than that in a week at Starbucks.

    I've done the math. In the long haul, it's cheaper to buy what you like, take good care of it & drive it until the wheels come off. If you're not a DIY guy - I'm not, unfortunately - don't go back to the dealer after the factory warranty expires. Find a good independent mechanic instead.

    If you follow your own rule #1, you'll find that rule #2 doesn't apply. A 328i equipped, as God intends, with a stick will do 0 to 60 in a hair over 6 seconds. That's plenty fast enough for a good time. You'll save a few thousand up front & you'll also save on repair costs in later years. That's win-win, if you ask me.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,899
    I'm with you jimbres. My 1995 3er and 2004 X3 have proven to be extremely reliable and not all that expensive to run. Aside from tires and scheduled maintenance I've spent a total of $1344 on repairs over the 15 years and 127,000 miles I've owned my 3er. You can check post #4920 for the details on the X3; in short it needed a passenger seat SRS sensor under warranty and other than that it's only needed one set of brakes and two sets of tires in 107,000 miles...

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,698
    Rule # 1 NEVER BUY A CAR WITH A TURBOCHARGED ENGINE!

    Why??

    I bought my first turbo car 10 years ago. It was the best car I've ever owned. I've now had 5 and never a problem with any of them related to the turbo.

    '13 Stang GT; '15 Fit; '98 Volvo S70; '14 Town&Country

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    This prejudice rightly comes from early turbos in the 1980s, which exhibited lag, were very peaky, coked-up, and failed early. But turbos and supes have come a long long way since then.

    On the other hand, not everyone (me, for instance) likes the way a turbo car responds---some prefer supercharging. And that's a legit concern IMO, although a subjective one.

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 31,211
    When you have an engine like the inline-6 of a BMW, and you know they can get 330 horsepower out of 3.2 litres without turbo-charging ('01-'06 M3), then you have to wonder.... WHY?

    I'll take a sweet BMW inline-6, normally aspirated... any day..

    Turbos have their place... I just see better options...

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    Well they do it because they want it to be faster than a Mustang V-6 I guess :)

    Turbos, in my humble opinion, work best on V-type engines, in pairs, and on higher displacement engines. For smaller displacement, I prefer a supercharger, because it gives a better low end power to relatively torque-less engines. If you ain't got displacement, you ain't got torque...they go hand in hand.

    BMW was one of the "turbo pioneers" for passenger car use, so I think they know what they're doing.

    But yeah, BMW is also known for their engines---that's what they do better than just about anybody--it is their forte.

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,698
    edited January 2011
    I've never had a supercharged engine, but I must say that VW and Volvo have both done great jobs getting low-end torque out of small engines with turbos. Granted, both my T5s with the automatic had a lag off the line, but at near 250 lb-ft at just 1800 rpms, it was a very brief lag. The VW with the stick is far better. Just 2 liters and a real-world 220 or so lb-ft available pretty much immediately.

    I also don't know about the general statement that it is better suited to V-type engines. I think any Toyota 2JZ owner would have to disagree.

    '13 Stang GT; '15 Fit; '98 Volvo S70; '14 Town&Country

  • srs_49srs_49 Posts: 1,394
    Well, my '87 325 that I acquired in 1999 with 127,000 miles on the odometer has cost me $5300 in routine maintenance and repairs over 11.5 years. That included a couple a sets of ties, brake pads/rotors, the usual water pump & timing belt changeout shortly after I got the car, control arm(s) and/or bushings, exhaust, headlights, wiper blades - everything.
  • what is hpfp's. I have a 09 335ix and to tell the truth I would hate to have paid for all the things that have failed with this car at 26000 miles. For me this will probably be my last BMW. I want reliability, performance, style and no wind noise.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    YOu know, I didn't really state that clearly. What I meant was that a turbo setup on a V-type engine is the *ideal* setup because you can use smaller turbos and get them out of the way. The plumbing is neater, I guess is what I meant.

    Maybe I just like the *whine* of a supercharger, and that it's not so peaky. On a FWD car with gobs of power, turbos can get a bit ornery to drive skillfully.

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  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    When you have an engine like the inline-6 of a BMW, and you know they can get 330 horsepower out of 3.2 litres without turbo-charging ('01-'06 M3), then you have to wonder.... WHY?

    Hmmm, all else being equal, I'd much rather have a 300 HP twin turbo 3.0 liter over a 330 HP normally aspirated 3.2 liter engine. Why? Because the 3.0 liter turbo will suck the doors off the larger engine unless both happen to already be at full boil.
  • sjkbmwsjkbmw Posts: 4
    MyI BMW service departmenttold me that it is normal for my car to burn oil. I have a 2008 328xi with 32k miles. First oil change done at around 18k (This is the time the car indicated for me to have the oil change based on the way that I drive.) Just this past November 2010 , with about 29k mile the oil light came on for the first time, and the dealer put some oil in the car and said that this is normal for this type of engine to burns a little oil. Is this an accurate statement?? The oil indicator light came on again in January 2011 with 32k miles. Is it normal for me to put a quart of oil every 10k miles?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    Yep, quite normal and in small amounts like that, even beneficial perhaps.

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,899
    I love E30 3ers. I'll have to nab one someday.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,899
    edited January 2011
    What Mr. Shiftright said; one quart every 10,000 miles is nothing. My 127,000 mile 1995 318ti has consistently consumed one quart of Mobil 1 every 2500 miles since I bought it new in November 1995. I never even mentioned it to my dealer while it was under warranty; it's simply no big deal...

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 31,211
    Not me... I don't need to be the fastest.. I like the linear power delivery of a NA engine...

    If I really need to be that fast, I can just get a Z06 (NA, there.. too)

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    I would guess that not too many people cross-shop BMW 3 Series and Corvettes. :P

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  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Based upon the relatively flat torque curve of the turbo motor, I would think that, if anything, the throttle response would be better than the normally aspirated engine.
  • dan12dan12 Posts: 114
    Rule # 1 NEVER BUY A CAR WITH A TURBOCHARGED ENGINE!

    The BMW mechanic I go to for my wife's X5 told me the same thing. If I want to save money on long term maintenance, I should get the 328i.

    My '07 335i has almost 49K miles. I have been told that the turbos can start having problems before 100K miles. I'm not sure how true that is. So far I have had the HPFP replaced, the rear brakes replaced because they were making a noise when turning left, the A/C blower fan replaced because it was making a noise when turning right, and 3-4 other things that were broken or leaking. Not exactly a stellar example of reliability for less than 50K miles. All of this was covered under warranty so I'm not complaining too much, but I had a much better experience with the Acura I owned years ago.... and a worse experience with my Jeep GC.

    I guess the HPFP problem is related to the turbos and maybe the brakes too since they are bigger/different from those of the 328i. The bigger factor might be that '07 was the year that BMW first introduced the twin turbo engine and the HPFP and squeaky brakes are the initial gremlins. I hope a 2011 335i doesn't have these problems. As for the other things that were broken or leaking, well, I guess I should expect that with a non-turbo bmw as well.

    My personal impression at this point is that if I want a reliable BMW my best bet is to get a non-turbo version late in the model cycle. A 2011 328i is probably a good bet. And I am sorry to say this, but I think a better bet for reliability is to buy an Acura, Lexus, etc.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    I think you are getting decades old information there. There may be other reasons for not having a turbo (more expensive to buy, more expensive to do repairs because of the plumbing in the way, probably a need for higher octane fuel) but you don't hear much about turbo failures on modern cars these days.

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  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Sounds like you should change your rule #1 to Never buy a car with a HPFP.

    You didn't mention any turbo's needing replacement...
  • Please give me some guidance, I have found a 1999 323i coupe, 5 speed with 153,000 miles. I need a reliable, economic car for $5,000 to use on my daily commute of 56 miles roundtrip. It being a fun car to drive is a huge bonus! I will have it checked by a mechanic, but, overall, would the car meet my needs.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,899
    The powertrain should be good for at least 250,000 miles. It's the ancillaries that could prove troublesome- radiator, HVAC fan, suspension bits, window regulators, etc. If you can't handle minor repairs and maintenance yourself I'd set aside @$100/month for repairs and maintenance. A BMW must be maintained by the book- to fail to do so will prove very costly.
    Finally, don't have it checked out by just "a mechanic"; find someone who KNOWS BMWs.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • nay5nay5 Posts: 1
    i just purchased a a used 2001 325i a new transmission was put in. the car has 165k mile did i make a mistake of buying this car
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,899
    An automatic I assume, correct? Who rebuilt the replacement? It's only a mistake if you paid too much or the car has been neglected. I hope you had an experienced BMW tech inspect it prior to purchase.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

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