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2010 Mitsubishi Outlander GT

Hi guys,

Just purchased my Outlander 2010 GT, over the weekend. I enjoy everything about it, esp the Rockfordfosgate sound system and rear view camera.

However, my A/C seems not to be working now, its blowing hot air instead, its hot in NYC/NJ area in July and Aug. The vehicle is only 3days old. Should I return it?

Also my dealer told me they cant mount a factory railing/rack on my GT, I have to go 3rd party railing/rack ie THULE or YAKIMA. Is this true?

I'm trying to really love this SUV esp my first one. But i'm thinking of returning this darn thing and replace it with Subaru 2.5XT Limited instead.
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Comments

  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    Wait a minute!

    Yes the GT blows warm air when you start the engine. This is just for 1-2 minutes after that it comes back to your pre-setting inside the car temperature. If the pre-set temperature is 50-60 degree Fahrenheit the A/C system thinks you are in cold weather and there it welcomes you with warm air. However this action is just for 1-2 minutes. Check your pre-setting temperature. The A/C system in your car or the temperature control in your car will be heading to the temperature you have asked (purposely or not) i.e. pre-set temperature.

    Yes you are right on this. The GT (model 2010) hasn’t come with a rail rack configuration (I have said this in the thread Outlander 2010 in December 2009). It is also true when your dealer has recommended you to implement the rail rack in a third party shop. However, if you want Mitsu OEM rail rack (+ cross rail accessory) you may order the rail rack kit suitable for the model 2010 XLS from any Mitsu dealer at a price. You may take this rail rack kit to a shop; the shop will drill holes on the top (roof) of your car and fix the rail rack onto your car. The finish must be the same that the XLS 2010. The Yakima or Thule finishing will be not the same than the XLS finish. I had this choice but I didn’t want to do holes on my brand new car.

    Mitsu philosophy appear to be that an AWD GT with differential on the front and in the rear (for high speed on the snow) to use a rail box on the top is contradictory to the performance of a GT. If you want a rack box then buy a 2010 model XLS which may satisfy your needs but don’t expect great performance on snow or ice at high speed as it was shown by my GT on snow/ice roads in my adventure to the Patagonia.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    batman, I'm going from memory here so I could be mistaken but I think someone posted that GTs made after a certain date (March? April?) have the mounting holes. They still don't come with the rack but it can be more easily installed.

    I'm guessing it's a mid-year engineering change based on owner feedback.

    Personally, I don't think I'd ever use a roof rack as it seems pretty inconvenient but would nonetheless appreciate the option of having one. And since the GT lacks badging - a minor gripe of mine - to denote it as the highest trim line, not having roof rails could lead some to believe that the owner bought a based, stripped-down model when the opposite is true.
  • leo67leo67 Posts: 17
    "not having roof rails could lead some to believe that the owner bought a based, stripped-down model when the opposite is true"

    Anti theft
  • @batman47, as an avid snowboarder & surfer (I ride 40+days per winter season), I need the best snow performance vehicle, hence I went with the GT and would prefer to have rack for my snowboards and surfboards.

    I guess I'm just going with Thule, if Mitsubishi can't install EOM rack on my GT.
  • @fushigi - I will check my GT tomorrow for mounting holes, I hope it came with it :)

    I will keep you posted, thanks
  • @fushigi, checked my vehicle for drill/mounting holes for roof rack but no luck.
  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    Even if Mitsu dealership cannot install your EOM rail rack (Perhaps it may invalidate your warranty) you may buy a kit that fit the Outlander XLS and install it in the shop where your dealer has recommended you. My dealer told me that a Thule rail track was in the region of $500-$700. The EOM Mitsu rail track is close to $1000 (all inclusive). Your dealer may take your GT to a body shop that specializes in this type of work.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    While I have gone faster than 90 I wasn't in 3rd gear doing it. :D
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,916
  • noeffectxnoeffectx Posts: 32
    edited August 2010
    I'm going to have my dealer (where I bought the vehicle, in NJ) install the EOM roof rack. They gave me a quote for $600. One of the reason I also bought the GT, coz the salesman guaranteed me, they can install the rack for me.

    Ive been calling multiple dealers around my area (NY within 5miles radius) and all gave me different answers. Finally I got fed up and drove to NJ and talked to the salesman who sold me the GT.

    I scheduled for next weekend's installation. I'll let you know how it goes and post some pictures too.
  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    The GT I bought in California appear to lack the following features:

    1- It doesn’t have a pull switch that electronically rolls-and-tumbles the second row of seats
    2- It doesn’t have a headlamp washer mechanism
    3-It doesn’t have the Mitsubishi All Terrain Technology (MATT) only Supper All Wheel Control (S-AWC)
    4- It doesn’t have a hot-cold thermo box
    5- It doesn’t have a Self-Leveling HID headlamp (Adaptive Front Lighting System)
    6- It doesn’t have cornering head lamp
    7-It doesn’t have a LSD-rear

    In my opinion Mitsubishi needs to get better in the following:

    a- Stronger interior quality material (not necessarily luxurious)
    b- Put another layer of body paint (At manufacturing)
    c- Increase the body panel thickness metal by 1/2 mm. Toyota and German cars look more solid (more meat).
    d- Widen the front wheel fender (arches) by a couple of millimeters to prevent small stones flying from the front wheel rotation to sand paper effects on the rear wheel fenders. MMA still hasn’t fully solved this problem.
  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    Wrong transmission settings may potentially damage your GT. Road conditions usually may puzzle you in choosing the proper setting (e.g. Tarmac, Snow and Lock). When the setting is “tarmac” the car is AWD engaged by default. Equally, the Active Stability Control (ASC) is ON by default. I have used this setting at speeds below or above 70 miles/hour (mph) when the road is dry or wet (e.g. screen washer is ON intermittently) or when the water depth on the tarmac is less than half an inch. All figures are approximate.

    I use the “snow” settings usually when it is snowing and when the snow on the tarmac road is not greater than 2-3 inches deep or when there are ice patches on the road. I didn’t drive at speeds greater than 60 mph.

    I use the “lock” setting when the driving speed is restrained by any condition on the road that keeps me at speeds no greater than 25 mph. The conditions of the road that restrained me from driving fast were: rugged terrain, e.g. stones (gravel) above 1 inch diameter, corrugated surface 1 inch up-down, broken stone/rock surface paths, thick mud, slippery muddy roads, sand, and so on. I have also used the lock setting when the tarmac road was cover by 4-6 inches deep snow.

    I have used the “tarmac” or “snow” setting on well maintained roads without tarmac usually at speeds below 50 mph.

    I have noted a few ASC flashing warning light on the instrumentation control when the system is telling me that my driving is a bit dangerous.

    When the speed is going to be below 30 mph for a long time the ASC should be disabled according to the experts.

    The problem of taking the GT to extreme driving by playing with the settings is that any distraction may make you forget that a setting has been changed and suddenly you find, for example, you are driving on tarmac when the car is engaged in “lock”. It happened to me a few times in spite of the fact that the driving setting is lit up on the instrumentation panel. There may be many things outside the car that mess up your concentration.
  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    I have said that the GT is not equipped to do serious driving on roads without tarmac, mainly due to the stock tires (225/55R18). The GT is well equipped with a center differential, LSD-center, and a LSD-front that make the GT a credible off tarmac road vehicle. It lacks a LSD-rear (Lancer Evolution) which could complete all the requirements needed to make the GT a complete on and off tarmac road vehicle.

    Having the GT the main differential mechanisms, the vehicle needs to be complemented with a good set of tires. This is my suggestions: (1) - If the vehicle is going to be driven 30% off tarmac and 70% on tarmac (regardless of weather conditions) then use a tire with a thread width of 215, or 225, or 235. (2)- If the vehicle is going to be driven 70% off tarmac and 30% on tarmac (regardless of weather conditions) then use a tire with a thread width of 245, or 255, or 265. If you expect to use point (2) then a mud flap (flexible) is recommended on the front fender wheel arches to prevent stones flying onto the rear of the car.

    The GT stock tires, i.e. 225/55R18 may well fit point (1) above. To comply with point (2) you may need to secure wheel sizes of 16-inches, or 17-inches diameter, e.g. 265/70R16 or 265/65R17.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    1- It doesn’t have a pull switch that electronically rolls-and-tumbles the second row of seats
    2- It doesn’t have a headlamp washer mechanism
    3-It doesn’t have the Mitsubishi All Terrain Technology (MATT) only Supper All Wheel Control (S-AWC)
    4- It doesn’t have a hot-cold thermo box
    5- It doesn’t have a Self-Leveling HID headlamp (Adaptive Front Lighting System)
    6- It doesn’t have cornering head lamp
    7-It doesn’t have a LSD-rear


    Of those features, which can be found on the GT's direct competitors (RAV4, CR-V, Forester, Edge, Equinox, etc.)? In order ..

    1. What non-luxury CUV/SUV offers power folding 2nd/3rd row seats? FTM do any luxury CUVs offer that? The Lexus RX doesn't. I'd take a power liftgate (which the Outlander could seriously use) over powered tumbling seats any day.

    FWIW I think the 2nd row seats tumble just fine but take too much effort to un-tumble. Not a problem for me but it's a little difficult for my wife who is short & not very strong.

    2. Would be nice, but not something I'd pay more than $100 or so for. On the RX, which I'm using for humorous comparisons this morning, this is only available as part of the $4900 Luxury package.

    3. S-AWC is arguably the most advanced AWD system in the Outlander's segment. For the vehicle's intended market, S-AWC is more than adequate. A better AWD system might help for those who off-road as you have but let's be honest; this simply doesn't apply to the majority of people who buy CUVs (of any make). The RX doesn't even offer an active front differential; just front/rear.

    4. Not something I'd pay for. When unused it'd eat into available cargo space. When needed, I've an old $35 cooler that holds ice for 5 days in 90 degree heat w/out needing power. And it can be removed from the car to take to the picnic table. I wouldn't mind, though, if they did that trick that VW does (http://blogs.insideline.com/roadtests/2010/07/2010-vw-gti-the-secret-fridge.htm- l)

    5. They are leveling but are not automatically so. I don't see what the big deal is, though. Adding weight sensors or suspension travel sensors to read the spring compression in order to adjust the lights would add needless cost & complexity. Again, which competitor offers this? On the RX it's part of (yet another) $2060 Comfort package (also needed to get rain-sensing wipers which the GT has standard). BTW I like the manual control myself as I prefer it on 1 instead of 0 for daily use.

    6. Might be useful, I suppose, but the HIDs throw light plenty wide (as well as far) IMO. Not something I'd pay for and it reminds me of the old cars with pop-up headlights where you'd always see one "winking" at you after a year or two when the motor would break. Part of that $2060 package on the RX.

    7. (See #3)

    So you can't get everything you wanted even if you took a $39K RX and added $7K worth of packages. That should tell you that while there are options you'd like, they generally don't fit the market the Outlander competes in. I'm not saying they don't have value; just that they don't have enough potential market value for the automakers to include in this class.

    a- Stronger interior quality material (not necessarily luxurious)
    b- Put another layer of body paint (At manufacturing)
    c- Increase the body panel thickness metal by 1/2 mm. Toyota and German cars look more solid (more meat).
    d- Widen the front wheel fender (arches) by a couple of millimeters to prevent small stones flying from the front wheel rotation to sand paper effects on the rear wheel fenders. MMA still hasn’t fully solved this problem.


    I don't take issue with any of these except that the added panel thickness will adversely effect weight & thus acceleration & fuel economy without helping the Outlander's already-very-good crash test results. They'd probably have to balance that by using either more plastics elsewhere or by using more expensive materials like aluminum.
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Posts: 5,663
    now this one might be worth considering by Mitsu though.

    d- Widen the front wheel fender (arches) by a couple of millimeters to prevent small stones flying from the front wheel rotation to sand paper effects on the rear wheel fenders. MMA still hasn’t fully solved this problem.

    Back in 2007 when my '08 Lancer GTS was new there were several guys and some gals who bought Lancers who complained about chipping paint. And it sure seems that widening the fender arches a titch might solve that problem.

    Having said that, my wife and I's '08 Lancer GTS has what our dealer calls the 'Auto Buter' treatment. Basically it's a paint protectant and polish regimen that gets applied every 6 months as per the agreement in our purchase contract. We don't have the paint chipping or pitting, though, so it seems to be working.

    It might be worth bringing this to the attention of Mitsubishi engineers, though. Maybe one of us popping an e-mail their way, seems to make sense to me.

    2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    I said I didn't take issue with the a-d items which implies I'm not against them. For the most part my opinion is neutral but I agree that steps made to prevent/reduce body & paint damage should be taken where reasonable.
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Posts: 5,663
    edited August 2010
    and to find this out one of us would have ta do some extra research to see what Mitsubishi might be doing to satisfy the unhappy over this issue. It would irritate me if it were an issue with our Lancer GTS, for sure.

    Twould be nice to see Mitsubishi step up with something simple to remedy this.

    2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

  • batman47batman47 Posts: 606
    Eventually all of those mentioned feature technicalities will come to the USA and it will not surprise me that the 2011 GT will have some of these features. Let’s wait and see (e.g. rear view camera: lacking on the2007 and 2008, but yes in the 2009 and 2010).

    For example the announced new Outlander Sport comes with the one-touch start system that is not found (yet) in the GT and it may also come with the “switch that electronically rolls-and-tumbles the second row of seats” and more. How does MMA expect to sell next year GT without something to entice in the buyer?
  • noeffectxnoeffectx Posts: 32
    edited September 2010
    To all Outlander GT 2010 owners, just want to share this with you, since our Rockford Fosgate are already equipped w/ bluetooth, mounting an iPad on the headrest for the back passengers, esp kids is no brainer =)
    image

    My daughter's Sesame ST shows to go =)
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