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Interesting info on synthetic oil recommendation

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Comments

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    Hmm, yeah - that looks a LOT different than the current SOHC or the DOHC of years past. Even the dipstick is far removed. I can't say I would miss the timing belt, though!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • It also has a top-mounted oil filter, next to the filler tube. No more reaching up through the hot exhaust shields and spilling oil on them.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    edited September 2010
    Oh, is that what that is? I'm no fan of the hot exhaust (tried it once), but it is easily solved with the help of an oil filter socket (about $7). I don't like the concept of a top-mounted filter (sounds messy and would be problematic to pre-fill), but if they set it up properly, it might just work out and would be really nice if it did!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • aathertonaatherton Posts: 617
    edited September 2010
    "... I'm no fan of the hot exhaust... but it is easily solved with the help of an oil filter socket... I don't like the concept of a top-mounted filter (sounds messy and would be problematic to pre-fill)..."

    I have done my Forester oil changes at 3,750 miles for 24,000 miles. The gusher of oil from the oversize plug, and the filter location, make it the hardest car I have ever had.

    The socket only enables the filter to be loosened. If unscrewed with the socket, oil will go everywhere. After loosening the filter, it can be removed rather cleanly by careful use of a 12 oz. paper coffee cup. The technique would complicate this post.

    The 2011 top mounted filter is contained in a cup. Oil from the removed filter drains back down into the engine.

    I have never pre-filled a filter in 50 years. A nice touch but not called for by mfrs or done by dealers or oil change shops. Pre-filling is unnecessary because the residual oil in the pump, and the oil films in the engine, last for minutes, while the oil pump refills the new filter in seconds.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    The 2011 top mounted filter is contained in a cup. Oil from the removed filter drains back down into the engine.

    That should work pretty well, then. Do you know if this engine uses the same filter as previous? From the photo, it looks like it may be a shorter/wider unit and would hopefully include an anti-drainback valve.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • aathertonaatherton Posts: 617
    edited September 2010
    I have no idea what kind of filter is uses. It would be nice if it used a regular type of filter that screwed into a regular mounting plate at the bottom. But with that cup, it might be some special OEM filter that screwed into the cup itself. Or even a canister filter contained in the cup.

    The Saturn 2.2L Ecotech engine has had a top mounted filter for years, but I don't know it's details.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I love that cup idea, and the top-mounted filter. This will cut oil change time in half.

    It's funny, I was just complaining to rsholland about how the filter was surrounded by hot exhaust on our 2009 model (that was not the case on my 1998 DOHC). Plus the dealer overtightened the filter and I could not get it off even with the oil filter socket wes recommends.

    So I went out and got a huge adjustable wrench that bites down and reaches up in to that cavity and got it loose. Without that tool I could not have removed it.

    GoodYear auto service overtightened the filter on my Sienna, also, so I think I'm done letting others change our oil. 2 bad experiences are enough.

    Plastic intake runners should put less weight at the top of the engine. I was always fascinated at how solid the old metal ones were, but it was probably overkill.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    That's what it's called. Mine's huge and strong enough to crush the filter and long enough to reach in there and get it out! Here's a pic:

    http://www.benmeadows.com/images/xl/10L-Straight-Jaw-Pliers-BEN-_i_LBM42760Z.jpg-

    I actually got it for my Sienna, to remove a canister-type oil filter that was overtightened. Every handy man should have one of these.

    image
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    edited September 2010
    Yeah, I have a couple of those and they can definitely come in handy in a pinch. Since we're on the topic of oil filters, I had to use my larger one (probably about 15-16 inches long) to pull both of the oil filters off the Ford engines I was finishing up this weekend.

    I literally would not have been able to remove them without this tool. I even had the engines out of the vehicles at the time!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Interesting.

    On my Toyota, I gave up (prior to having that tool) and made the folks who overtightened it remove the filter for me. They had to drain the oil so they refilled it for free (I provided the filter element).

    No other tool could remove it, but this one will.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    Haha; I should have taken a photo of the filters I removed. They were incredibly stubborn! The pliers got them off, but they were trashed! :P
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    The disposable Subaru filter did get trashed.

    My Toyota uses a filter cartridge, so the container (metal, pretty sturdy) is sturdy enough that it comes off without damage.

    I should hope!
  • I don't see where pliers have any place in removing a Subaru oil filter. Use a cap that fits over the end of the filter and is driven by a long extension on a socket wrench.
  • dcm61dcm61 Posts: 1,478
    I don't see where pliers have any place in removing a Subaru oil filter. Use a cap that fits over the end of the filter and is driven by a long extension on a socket wrench.

    When Subaru changes the filter diameter 3 times during the course of owning one vehicle, you kinda get tired of buying new filter caps. Even the adjustable "caps" are too big for the tiny blue filters.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,651
    That is a "when all else fails" strategy. If you're removing it, it is used and will be disposed anyway, so why not?

    If it is on very tight, the end caps will often deform the thin metal of the filter and slip. Thankfully, the circumference of the stock Subaru filter was a little bigger than the replacement filters, so I had to tap my socket on with a hammer first. Tight or no, that thing was coming off!

    I only use the socket for my Forester because it is not possible for me to get my hand around it. On all my other vehicles, I remove and install them by hand. I have to use the socket to install the filter on the Forester, too!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I don't see where pliers have any place in removing a Subaru oil filter. Use a cap that fits over the end of the filter and is driven by a long extension on a socket wrench.

    You missed the part where I mentioned I tried that. Did not work - could not get enough grip to twist, it would slip and strip the side of the filter (OE Subaru). The filter was overtightened, remember.

    Funny thing is I actually tried TWO oil filter sockes. The first one was metal, from Advance Auto Parts, and the 2nd was a hard plastic one from NAPA. Both failed.

    Hence the need for pliers, which clamped tight enough to twist it off.

    I'm not really concerned about damage to the oil filter as it's done being used anyway.
  • aathertonaatherton Posts: 617
    edited September 2010
    I use a metal cap nut that fits tightly over the end of the filter. It fits the many flats on the end of the filter so tightly that it cannot possibly slip. If a cap nut slips, it might not be the right size. I have two cap nuts for the three cars we presently have.

    I have large pliers, and have used them over the decades on a couple of other cars, but the Subaru filter is so tightly confined by heat shields that I cannot get my hand on it, much less get pliers around it.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I hear you - I used the same exact thing!

    Metal failed.

    The NAPA plastic/composite one also failed.

    There was just no way.

    Like I said it was way overtightened.

    The pliers stick out quite a bit, especially the large-sized ones. It reaches the filter easily. Took me an hour and a half struggling with the metal and plasic caps, and about 7 seconds with the pliers.
  • morin2morin2 Posts: 399
    A little late to this party - but I had the same problem with an overtightened oil filter and took it back to the dealer to be removed - at which time they managed to hit my new Outback and scuff the rear bumper when parking another one too close. Never again!

    Anyway, the problem is that the caplike filter sockets that you buy at Advance or Napa, metal or plastic, are 67 mm and very slightly too large - so they slip just enough on an overtightened filter to round off the edges of the filter flats. Those aftermarket sockets would be fine if the filter was not on with excessive torque. The OEM subaru oil filter socket is 66.5 mm and a more precise fit - at least for the old style made in Japan black filters (which I bought out a dealer's supply of about 5 dozen when subaru changed to the blue Honeywells - which I will not use).
  • "I use a metal cap nut that fits tightly over the end of the filter. It fits the many flats on the end of the filter so tightly that it cannot possibly slip. If a cap nut slips, it might not be the right size. I have two cap nuts for the three cars we presently have."

    Now I find that my cap nut that fits the old black filters does not fit the new blue filters. The blue filters are slightly smaller in diameter, and I cannot find a cap nut small enough to fit them tightly. So I had to buy the gizmo with the clamping fingers.
  • dcm61dcm61 Posts: 1,478
    edited November 2010
    So I had to buy the gizmo with the clamping fingers.

    I have two "gizmos with the clamping fingers" and they both are too big for the blue filters. :(

    16.5" (4.25" jaw) channel locks for me. :)
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