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Honda Odyssey vs Dodge/Chrysler minivans

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Comments

  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    I would never buy a DC van in a million years even if it had factory NAV, which apparently it does NOT since the dealer has to install the NAV.
    Besides, the looks of the T&C inside and outside just looks "slightly ugly" as jsmath5 would put it:-)
  • crkeehncrkeehn Posts: 513
    Apparently the person that wrote is interested in the DC van. They studied and considered that the DC van offered what they were interested in.

    Andrew, apparently you had the opposite feeling. That doesn't make them wrong or you totally right.
  • tomtomtomtomtomtom Posts: 491
    if you are not going to buy DC van in a million years why would you care if they offer a NAV or not. I don't care if Ponitac has one because I will not buy one and certainly won't go to Pontiac's website to see they have one.

    By the way, here is the reason why (I think) DC didn't install the Nav from the factory. Unlike
    most Nav that need a big screen on the center console to operate, the one from DC built within the radio. Since a customized center console is not needed in DC case you can always add one in the future.
  • tomtomtomtomtomtom Posts: 491
    Since my DC van's center console isn't customized I have added a Pioneer Nav and DVD player into the center console. Now I can watch DVD in front while the car is moving. I know it is not safe ;-) but can your Nav equipped Ody do that?
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    I like NAV no matter who has them--DC, Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Buick, etc.
    There are pros & cons with aftermarket NAV, just like all aftermarket products.
    I guess as long as the dealer can install them and give you the same bumper to bumper warranty, it's alright.
    But the most important reason for me is the looks. A big screen NAV on the center console looks great. With the aftermarket, the screen is either small or it is motorized to retract or "disappear" into the unit when it is turned off. And the way it looks just doesn't look quite as good as a permanent NAV screen on the console.
    Of course with your aftermarket, you could install it in your future vehecile and I cannot do that on my Ody.
    But how long does it take for the screen to open up and get started?
    Well, NAV is great, but how does the NAV look on the dealer installed van? Is it a motorized one like your Pioneer?
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    I couldn't care less to watch dvd while the car is moving. I have dvd/vcr/tv for the rear entertainment on a 7" widescreen.
    All I care about while driving is the NAV and the cool looking factory NAV screen.
    But I think your Pioneer aftermarket NAV is just as good as any NAV. Is it voice activated?
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    I guess I'm more used to the Japanese Lexus and Acura looks. Anything else, including the German cars like Mercedes and BMW or "American" cars, just does not look good to me.
    I grew up with my dad and his "American" car plus a million repairs. I finally got him switched to Toyota and now he is a Toyota person forever.
    So based on countless repair experiences, I would never ever buy another "American" car make.
    But that's just me.
    Also, the Ody is the best looking minivan :-)
  • tomtomtomtomtomtom Posts: 491
    It takes 10 seconds for the 7" screen to come out and start playing and yes it is voice activated. The one from DC has the screen on the center of the radio.
  • steelengsteeleng Posts: 71
    I think maybe Andrewtran should be driving a giant Nav system on wheels (with leather seating of course) :). I personally do not care much for Nav systems in vehicles. The $2000 cost is something I just cannot justify when I can easily get by with my $15 atlas for the 2 or 3 times a year that I actually need it (I plan my route ahead of time so that I don't have to look at it while driving). I also do not like the look of a big touch screen in the middle of my dash. Finally, I find them to be a distraction like cell phones. There is nothing like the experience I had riding with my boss in his LS430 with him holding a cell phone to his ear with one hand and poking the Nav screen with his other hand. Luckily we were on a five lane stretch of freeway because that left two lanes for the rest of the drivers to use. YMMV
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    I don't get it. So how big is the screen?
    So is the NAV screen installed on the dash permanently?
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    It may just be a cool toy. However, when I drive to Texas, the NAV is great to have. I don't have to think about maps. I think that if you have a good trial of the NAV, you would be hooked too.
    It all started for me when I rented a car from Hertz Rental. The only car left on the lot had NAV, so they let me drive it without charging me the usual $6 per day for the NAV. Man, it was great. After that I was hooked. I bought the DeLorme Earthmate GPS for my Laptop. It worked okay, but nothing like the "real" stuff. So when my wife said we needed a minivan, I just had to have it.
    Life is too short. Have fun while you can and enjoy the moment and all the toys-for-boys:-)
  • hansiennahansienna Posts: 2,312
    Based on a previous post, AAA selected the Acura 3.2TL and Lexus GS 400 as their pick in their price range since they are the most likely to break down. I quote from a previous post: "The whole AAA organization exists for people whose cars are likely to breakdown".
         Acura 3.2TL and Lexus GS 400 selected for the same reason it was stated AAA selected Chrysler minivan. (However, the AAA link specified the Dodge Grand Caravan as the choice of AAA for minivans).
        Spread the word: Do NOT buy an Acura or Lexus because ...." If everyone drove Honda's and Toyotas' there would be no need for an AAA."
  • tomtomtomtomtomtom Posts: 491
    Judging from the brochure/website and the size of the actual radio. I think the screen is about 4". No, the screen is on the front face of the radio.
  • Did someone say 7" "widescreen"? What has this world come to?

    - Rob
  • andrewtran71andrewtran71 Posts: 840
    7" widescreen LCD is the standard these days on minivans with RES including the Odyssey and Sienna.
  • tomtomtomtomtomtom Posts: 491
    I know. You really can't call a 7" screen a widescreen. But by definition any screen in 16:9 is called widescreen
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189
    "Chrysler's previous decision to stick with bulky seats that have to be removed, instead of incorporating a fold-flat third seat, has been viewed by auto analysts and its own dealers as one of the biggest errors in design judgment in the last decade."

    Chrysler turns to flat-folding seats (USA Today)

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • lfikelfike Posts: 38
    These guys have been at the minivan mkt for about 2 decades and they still cut corners. They should be light years ahead of their competitors. I honestly believe one of the biggest problems they have is using cheap parts in their assembly. Like the PT Cruiser and Sebring Convertable (both made in Mexico by the way)....They have nothing but problems. Good ole Honda and Toyota (both built in USA) use better parts...I think it's that simple...use a better water pump and you won't have it fail as soon as a cheap one.....Chrysler cuts corners where they should'nt. I know one thing that's certain, it's not the American workers fault. They have proved that with Honda in Marysville Ohio.
    I do think Honda has to step up to the plate and make their warranty longer. Those Korean car companies are starting to take a toll on the auto market. Can you imagine how many cars Honda would sell if they had a 10yr 100,000 mile warranty?
    I'm rambling again..sorry...
    my 2 cents
  • ...on parts according to my mechanic. They are going to try to make up the loss on sales by getting more money off replacement parts. In other words, don't expect quality to improve.
  • crkeehncrkeehn Posts: 513
    The PT Cruiser has proven itself to be quite reliable in the first few years. Although there are ones that are problematic, there are also many that have no problems at all.

    According to the Consumer Reports Frequency of Repair records, the 2002 PT Cruiser over two years has had an excellent reputation, I believe that Road and Track in their long term report commented that the PT Cruiser compiled "one of the most impressive records of any vehicle in the history of the long-term fleet."
  • saverisaveri Posts: 19
    Cheap parts vs. cheap labor are 2 different things. How do you know the Chrysler parts are cheap? Warranty is not a guaranteed indicator of cheap parts, it is an indicator of poor/inadequate design. The people who designed the parts did not anticipate all the ways the part is stressed under daily use. You can have an poorly designed expensive part fail.

    Just wanted to clarify the above issue. Not intending to make any statements of where labor should or should not be kept.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,329
    but I I'll agree with crkeehn. The PT Cruisers have a good record. The Sebring covertibles that were built in that factory in Mexico (I think through 2000) were pretty typical of American car reliability - trouble in the first two years and then decent. I had a 98 Sebring and it never gave me a lick of trouble (sample size of one).

    Sebrings are now built in Michigan.

    I agree on the management vs labor issue and cheapness of parts. If you give American workers a good plant and the right parts they will build a quality vehicle every time. It is shameful that we need the Japanese to prove that to us.
  • crkeehncrkeehn Posts: 513
    Repeat after me...

    They're not all Windstars

    They're not all Windstars

    They're not all Windstars

    (Just don't do it on the information desk or your branch manager will have to put you in a quiet room.)
  • hayneldanhayneldan Posts: 657
    Is your mechanic a Toyota or a DC mechanic or independent? He must really know a lot about cars. What newspaper or car magazine does he write for? Which DC parts did he use on your Toyota?
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,329
    Hey! Ya know friends of ours bought one a while after we had the disaster. They've still got it but it's like an engine later and teh "check engine" light is on. I suppose this means they are supposed to look and see if it's still there.
  • Yes. I am that pathetic.

    I have three kids, so a minivan is a necessity. I bought the Voyager in late 1996, just after the 3rd was born. It immediately began letting me down with one failure after another. Even though the early ones were all covered by warranty, I still ended up having to rent cars whenever the van needed a head gasket, valve cover, new computer, etc.

    When the opportunity came to buy a second car in 2001, I still needed a dependable minivan--and the Voyager was not it. So I bought a Sienna which has performed flawlessly so far.

    Even though I only drive the Voyager some 4,000 to 5,000 miles per year, it still has managed to break down on me on a regular basis.

    So what parts did various mechanics use in my Voyager? Just about every damn part you can think of!

    The current mechanic is a transmission rebuilder. Although he says the DC van tranny's have improved, about 25-30% of his business is on DC vans. (He has never had to do a Seinna.)

    I have been unfortunate to own crappy DC van and have come to know many others with similar misfortunes. I feel it is my duty to warn my fellow citizens of the difficult life that one may have if he or she falls prey to the siren song of a DC van!

    I hope that answers your questions and thank you for your concern.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,329
    That using car based transmissions on these beasts just doesn't work. Is there ANY van out there where people aren't just a little concerned about the tranny? Heck, you've got people reporting problems in 04 Siennas!
  • crkeehncrkeehn Posts: 513
    It's like the first Volkswagen buyers. One was parked by the side of the road when a second pulled up to see if he could help. The first was staring blankly into the front of his car. He informed the second that his engine was missing, the second driver responded "That's Okay, I have a spare in the trunk."
  • lfikelfike Posts: 38
    I'm really not here to pick on any one model...I used the PT cruiser as an example because I had 4 friends at work + myself that had all 2001 Cruisers.....3 of the 5 had tranny problems...one had no problems what so ever and the last one had tons of problems with everything but the tranny.
    I stick by my guns with the comment about chrysler using cheap parts....I wish they made a car as dependable as Honda and Toyota....I'd be glad to spend my money for a "all" USA made vehicle....I'm talking one that has all USA parts and labor and owned by a USA company...but hey, those days are over.
    By the way...I see this commercial on TV where the guy talks (bragging) about his old pick-up truck last 200,000 miles and 2 engines??? Only two engines! I've seen a 86 dx accord hatchback that had 615,000 miles...and a Acura Legend at the Pittsburgh auto show that had over a million miles a while back. My question is : if it's not the parts or the workers...what is it that causes all these breakdowns?
    again, only my opinion here :>)
  • lfikelfike Posts: 38
    you said:
    Cheap parts vs. cheap labor are 2 different things. How do you know the Chrysler parts are cheap? Warranty is not a guaranteed indicator of cheap parts, it is an indicator of poor/inadequate design. The people who designed the parts did not anticipate all the ways the part is stressed under daily use. You can have an poorly designed expensive part fail.

    I agree with your first comment....though I disagree with your second concerning the Warranty.
    I also agree with the poorly design comment...hey two out of three ain't bad..;>)
This discussion has been closed.