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Honda Odyssey vs Dodge/Chrysler minivans

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Comments

  • I disagree with most of your comments. There are no wide spread reliability issues with the Odyssey (regardless of the noise some people here try to make, the tranny issue is only thought to effect less than 2% of the vehicles from 1999-2001 and Honda is addressing this by extending warranties for most of the vehicles that may be impacted). Doubt the Impala will prove to have stellar reliability. I haven't seen anything indicating poor 3rd row seat safety on the Odyssey. Only reports I have seen are for those vehicles (mostly SUVs) that have the third seat headrest a few inches from the rear gate. The Odyssey is one of the safest vehicles made, in any class. If you wouldn't use the third seat (since you bought a sedan) why does it even matter? Don't know about the seat belts so I can't comment. Regarding "stigma", I agree minivans are not the "coolest" cars out there but I don't think they are giving anything up to an Impala.

    A sedan is not an option for the vast majority of minivan buyers. A sedan does not provide seating for seven (or more), has a fraction of the cargo room, does not allow one to pass between rows while inside the vehicle, sedans lack sliding doors making getting kids in/out of car seats more difficult and finally they are not as safe as the safest minivans. This is a minivan discussion, not a why a sedan meets my needs better discussion.
  • mliongmliong Posts: 231
    You may want to check your servers. It seems that a virus crept into this newsgroup! :O
  • I think it is fair to say that the Odyssey is not as reliable as the Accord or Civic. However, that does not mean it has widespread reliability problems. Conversations on internet forums are not the same as statistical studies.

    If you were so concerned with reliability why did you get a GM? (sorry couldn't help myself)
  • mliongmliong Posts: 231
    Sorry, that was just too good to pass up.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 39,936
    GM's actually did pretty good in the most recent CR list of recommended vehicles - mostly SUVs though. Lost my link - I think I posted it in the Yukon discussion.

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    Moderator
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  • mliongmliong Posts: 231
    I don't recall them making anything other than Trucks or SUVs...
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 39,936
    I can't keep that straight. To me GM means the parent company, so GM makes Chevy which makes Ventures. Ditto the Montana & Silhouette. GMC will always mean trucks to me because my mom drove one. And I tend to lump SUVs in with trucks instead of crossovers or glorified MVs or wagons.

    Whatever floats your boat works for me ;-)

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
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  • bdaddybdaddy Posts: 171
    "A Chevrolet Celebrity would be cooler than any minivan, IMO" - pluto

    Cool was when I cared. I had some pretty cool cars in my day. I can't tell you how many hours were spent washing, waxing, tuning, repairing and modifying. Then I got married. No need to be cool anymore - need to be practical and have comfort and convenience features.

    Chevy Impala cooler than a minivan? Maybe, if it's a '68 Impala SS convert. with a 396 or 427 tri-power. If not, don't waste my time.
  • pat84pat84 Posts: 817
    "A Chevy Celebrity is cooler than a minivan." In a DC vs. Odyssey topic. Nice to see some trolls' posts are OK.
  • pluto5pluto5 Posts: 618
    You're right; Ody is no competition for any sport sedan.
  • artgpoartgpo Posts: 483
    To those who posted concerning IIHS' crash test of a 1997 (none since) GM triplet:
    Go to that same web site and read the ratings for number of property and injury claims. The Olds Silhouette has the LOWEST (meaning least) % of claims of both categories of ALL large vehicles. Their numbers, not mine.

    I have noticed that ANY manner of stating contrary information sparks all manner of attack, some personal. I have owned six new minivans of which three were absolute dogs: 1983 VW Vanagon, 1987 Nissan Van, 1993 Grand Caravan. The Nissan was SO bad that Nissan eventually had to buy them back as they were fire hazards. The best minis were a '90 Pontiac Transport and '97 Windstar. The jury is out on the '03 Silhouette.

    I say "do your research". Go to as many auto site as possible and read the information, especially owner comments. I do not always trust the word of auto critics who get the vehicles to test for free. Consumer Reports (I am a subscriber for 30 years)only offers their OPINION. Just don't shoot from the hip.
  • bdaddybdaddy Posts: 171
    No minivan will ever compete with a sports sedan in the areas of acceleration and handeling, although the Ody 0-60 time of 7.9 seconds is probably faster than your Impala. But hey, I didn't buy my MV to blow the doors of of your Impala, I bought it to transport my family in safety, comfort and convenience.

    Calling the GM Impala a sports sedan is a stretch. Considering all of the other vehicles that are truely representitive of this vehicle class, I would have to advise prospective buyers that they could do much better.
  • pat84pat84 Posts: 817
    You can always make an Impala faster by putting a Nascar sticker on the rear window.
  • cavillercaviller Posts: 331
    "To those who posted concerning IIHS' crash test of a 1997 (none since) GM triplet:
    Go to that same web site and read the ratings for number of property and injury claims. The Olds Silhouette has the LOWEST (meaning least) % of claims of both categories of ALL large vehicles. Their numbers, not mine.

    I have noticed that ANY manner of stating contrary information sparks all manner of attack, some personal.
    "

    Property, injury and death statistics do have a small component of crashworthiness in them. Unfortunately, they have a large component of nonvehicle factors like driver profile as well. A more likely conclusion is that Silhouette drivers are safer drivers on average than those of other minivans. This also explains why essentially identical vehicles such as the GM Trio, Voyager/Caravan, Quest/Villager and Sable/Taurus have varying results.

    Even so, keep in mind that most minivans score in the best "Substantially Better than Average" category in the Injury and Death rates tabulated by the IIHS. Even if I was to ignore all the other relevant safety data available, the minor differences within the best category are probably not enough to claim one is significantly better than the other.

    Crash tests, on the other hand, put vehicles in identical crash situations and measure direct injury and intrusion measures upon the occupants. You could also quibble about the rankings and specific injury measures of vehicles that received the same "4-star" in an NHTSA test or an "Acceptable" in the IIHS Offset test, but that probably isn't worth the effort, either. On the other hand, I am concerned when I start to see "3-star" ratings or "Marginal" IIHS results. If the automakers cannot design a vehicle to perform well in a long-established test whose parameters can be duplicated by manufacturers, why would I think they have made the effort to design the vehicle to perform well in crashes that may vary from the standardized tests?

    While it's nice to know that other drivers of your vehicle tend to be safer than those of other vehicles, I would think that anyone genuinely concerned about safety as a top priority should also want to know that their vehicle does well in all the standardized crash/rollover tests and has a nice assortment of advanced safety and crash avoidance features. Of course, safety isn't the top priority for everyone. We all pick the vehicle that meets ALL our priorities the best, including price, long term value, comfort, convenience, performance, reliability, color selection, etc, etc.
  • mliongmliong Posts: 231
    I agree with your well written and thoughtful post.
  • pluto5pluto5 Posts: 618
    Your condescending attitude is typical of Honda owners.

    For your information sedans have front and rear crush zones making the rear seat safer than the rear seat in a minivan. I simply expressed the opinion that children are safer in the rear seat of a large sedan than the third row seat in an Ody or DC van.
  • At least in Canada, interest rates offered by the dealer at Honda is not very impressive (close to 8%). You can get slightly better rates through banks, but not significantly lower. Manufacturers like Chrysler, GM and Ford offers much lower rate. This almost makes up for the difference in depreciation cost. (Ok, so it doesn't completely cover the difference, but the "depreciation factor" is now much smaller). I owned a combo of one GM and one Honda vehicle for a while, and this is proving out to be true over and over again. I tend to keep them for about 5 years at a time.



    Any comments?
  • bdaddybdaddy Posts: 171
    "Your condescending attitude is typical of Honda owners."

    Ahhh, but I also own a GM (Cheby pick-up). GM - mark of excellence!!
  • cavillercaviller Posts: 331
    "For your information sedans have front and rear crush zones making the rear seat safer than the rear seat in a minivan."

    Minivans have rear crush zones, too. Unfortunately, they are much shorter than in sedans, especially in short wheelbase versions. The major risk is seatback failure in a severe crash from the rear. Fortunately, these types of crashes are pretty rare, around 5% of all fatal crashes. Seatback failure is more likely when a third row seat is loaded by one or more heavy adults. Injury is more likely when the adults are not seated in a position with a head restraint or lap+shoulder belt (i.e. the center in most minivans).

    "I simply expressed the opinion that children are safer in the rear seat of a large sedan than the third row seat in an Ody or DC van."

    Children in a properly used harnessed carseat or high back booster do not have nearly the same risk factors as an adult in the third row. They are light, and will not load the seat nearly as much. The shells of their carseats provide much better protection from intrusion. Harnessed carseats provide much better protection from ejection. My opinion is that the 3rd row of an extended wheelbase minivan only has a very slight disadvantage compared to a sedan for young children.

    Side impacts are more common and tend to be more severe than rear impacts. There is little crush space in any vehicle. I'd give a very slight edge to children in the minivan, since they will be riding higher than in most sedans.

    BTW- Good luck with your Impala. An excellent choice for a very safe vehicle.
  • pat84pat84 Posts: 817
    The Odyssey does have a lap and shoulder belt for all three in the back seat. The center seat lap belt has a clip that secures it in the overhead. There are also three adjustable head restraints in the rear seat. The rear seat is quite away from the rear hatch. There is a well in the back that separates the rear seat from the rear of the Odyssey. The folded rear seat. fits in the well. There has never been any documented rear seat failures of the Odyssey.
    Some time many years ago, the DC vans (may have been the only minivan at the time) had the rear door open in some accidents with un belted passengers being ejected. This was fixed and hasn't happened since. I had a 96 DC van that did not have a shoulder belt in the center of the rear seat. I do not know about current DC vans, although I have rented newer DC vans, I did not really check out the rear seat.
    Interesting, in the offset collision tests, the drivers lower leg and ankle were considered "at risk" in the Impala. Not so of the 5 star Odyssey.
    I did not mean to be condescending,
    I have a friend who really discrinates against an Odyssey owner, with whom I am aquanted. It is my friends's attitude that needs an adjustment. He has no sense of humor. The Odyssey owner does.
This discussion has been closed.