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Subaru Impreza WRX

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Comments

  • barresa62barresa62 Posts: 1,379
    the WRX wagon only has a 17mm rear swaybar and not the sedan's 20mm rear swaybar (an easy $87 upgrade through your friendly Subaru dealer). :-)

    Stephen
  • rileyyhrileyyh Posts: 49
    Hi. Since I've practically put away the thought of purchasing a VW Jetta 1.8T and getting a WRX Sedan, my only question now is whether I should get a manual (which is cheaper and funner) and learn it or get an automatic (which has better AWD technology and stiffer springs).

    Let me just say that, while I think I could learn how to drive manual very well in a day or two, I haven't driven in a while and I would be unfamiliar with the roads in VA. Getting a manual would mean me and my dad can use my car, but an automatic would also allow my mom to use my car when she needs to. My dad has an automatic Q45 that they can use (but my mom hardly drives, is learning, so not much of a factor). Please tell me which is better for me. Thanks.

    riley

    soon to be silver WRXer
  • hunter001hunter001 Posts: 851
    I think in this matter, you have to make the decision for yourself, now that you are aware of the pros and cons of each configuration.

    Later...AH
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Riley,

    Who's WRX is this going to be? Choose the transmission that best fits needs and objectives of the primary driver. I don't think we can answer that question for you.

    FYI, it takes a little more than just two days to drive stick "very well" -- just so you know.

    Ken
  • barresa62barresa62 Posts: 1,379
    As it was posted prior...you have to make the decision between auto or manual yourself. You will own it...you drive it! Despite what AH says the avg person is not going to know the difference in the AWD between auto and manual or the stiffer springs. Those that do are blowing smoke you know where. I know...pretty blunt but the truth as I see it. You will, however, notice the difference in performance between the auto and the manual. The auto may adapt to your driving technique to the point where you will notice it but the gap in acceleration times compared to the manual will still be significant enough that your butt-meter will know the difference. Of course, you could go on about the adaptive automatic, the superior AWD, and the stiffer springs. It won't change the facts.

    Basically, it comes down to driving both an auto and manual WRX. If you are lucky enough to drive a broken-in auto (for sake of argument), that would even be better. Just remember (repeat, repeat), it will be your car. Pick the one that appeals to you most. :-)

    Stephen
  • bruticusbruticus Posts: 229
    I just re-discovered this Flash movie.

    DjB
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    You probably experienced some lift-off oversteer or something. The dealer warned me about that, because awd vehicles have that tendency, cause if you go too fast into a corner, you shouldn't just lift off the throttle. I have experienced this myself- after buying the car. It's kinda unnerving, but if you stay on the gas, it'll go through the turn just fine. But I also doubt you were going 65 mph in a curve marked for 45 mph. It's a great car, but it does have different handling tendencies than front wheel or rear wheel drive vehicles.
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    Sorry I didn't reply quicker. Some people on i-club already have that wheel on their WRX, but I don't think it looks that great on our cars. I think the more spokes, the better. It looks at home on the legacy B4, but the design doesn't seem totally harmonious on thw WRX. They are nice and light though, but I believe they're a dealer installed option, so it would take people out of stock-class in the SCCA/Autocross. For the price of the 17" 5 spoke OEM wheels, I'd go for OZ Superleggeras.
  • barresa62barresa62 Posts: 1,379
    They are light, reasonably priced, strong, and great looking wheels on the WRX. The only reason I didn't get them was because I wanted a 7.5" rim width to go with 225/45 tires. The 'leggra only comes in a 7"width. The offset is 48mm. 48mm and 7"rim will work but this offset is really the ideal one w/a 7.5"rim. Additionally, 225's will work on a 7"rim but a better match is a 7.5"rim with this tire size. Hey...no one said the wheel decision was easy on a WRX! :-)

    Stephen
  • WarpDriveWarpDrive Posts: 506
    buying a wheel is a deeply personal choice.

    I went through a whole range of emotions when buying my wheel. Went from looking at Rotas, to Prodrives, BBS, SSR's. Then faced dilemmas about strength vs cost, width, weight vs offset, dark vs light, hubcentric or not, yada yada. At least Subaru made it partly easy for us, the majority of wheels out there don't fit our cars.

    Personally, I don't really like the OEM or even the UK OEM wheels which are similar in design. And the alternate B4-like wheels look too generic on the WRX. I didn't really like the high spoked wheels, but I came around to it.
  • hunter001hunter001 Posts: 851
    Thanks for the info. But the B4 wheels are a bit too heavy at 19 lbs. For the twin-turbo legacy, it may be okay, due to the availability of a lot of low-end torque but for the WRX, it may be a little too heavy.

    I like the OEMs a lot and might ultimately settle for the UK OEMs with 215/45 tires.

    Later...AH
  • barresa62barresa62 Posts: 1,379
    "At least Subaru made it partly easy for us, the majority of wheels out there don't fit our cars."

    Wow, I never looked at it that way! You're right though, LOL.

    Stephen
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    I'm actually leaning heavily towards the Rota Tarmacs-they're replicas of the Prodrive p7, and they're relatively lightweight at 17lbs. They're supposed to be good wheels, as there is a racing team with a WRX that uses Rota Subzeros, which are a different design but in the same price range. Nobody has reported any problems AFAIK. They sell for $550/set/shipped from revolutionsmotorsports.com, and on i-club.com. With Kumho 712 tires, they're $900+shipping, which I think is a good deal.

    I'm just waiting for somebody to buy my old MX6 so I can use that money towards buying some toys for the WRX- I'm thinking wheels/tires, and maybe a turbo back exhaust. I was thinking about the vishnu stage 0, but I don't know if I'm totally comfortable about making changes in the engine bay before the warranty expires. We'll see though. Going to that WRX meet makes me want to spend all my money on the car (not necessarily a good thing).
  • barresa62barresa62 Posts: 1,379
    Yeah...that's the downside of going to the "meets"! I still go, I still spend, I'm....out of control!

    Seriously, though, I've also gotten a lot of helpful info and met some great people at the two club's meets I've gone to, NW i-club & Vancouver B.C i-club, also the Pacific NW Subaru Enthusiast's Club (PNWSEC).

    BTW, I think the Rota Tarmacs are a fine choice. They are a bit lighter than the P1s (about 2 lbs less) and look just as good. :-)

    Stephen
  • What do you guys pay for the WRX each month? I know alot of variables figure into monthly payments, but it'd be cool to see a range that the payments are falling into. I'm looking at the possibility of leasing the WRX, if the numbers look good. Fun as hell to drive, I know that much. Thanks in advance.
  • hunter001hunter001 Posts: 851
    Paid cash for it. No monthly payments.

    Later...AH
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I don't think they are worth squat. I'd get the rims and put on some good tires.

    MX6... is it a turbo?

    :)

    -mike
  • WarpDriveWarpDrive Posts: 506
    I'd stay away from those Kumhos too. My friend continually has vibration problems once he got those despite state of the art balancing on Hunter Vibration machines.

    You'd be better off sticking with the 16's and splurging on Bridgestone RE730's, S-03's, Toyo T1-S, Firestone SZ50EP, Dunlop SP9000's, Michelin Pilot Sports.
  • I have Kumho 712 tires and I'm very happy with them, after about 1000 miles. They may not outperform some of the more expensive tires, but I think they're a good compromise. And after driving >100 miles in icy conditions last month, I'm convinced that, at least here in TX, they'll do the job all year round.
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    Hmm. Interesting- This tire got good reviews on tire-rack, but some people on I-club reported vibration issues and they couldn't rectify them. What about Sumitomo HTRZ or HTR ZII? I know there are a lot of more expensive tire choices, but I'm trying to keep this reasonable.

    I've thought about just getting new tires, but I'm also attracted to the better looks of a new rim design. The OEM rim is also tough to clean, especially because of those double spokes that are so difficult to get into. I'm also looking forward into the future where I'll be getting bigger brakes, and most likely I'll need 17in wheels to fit most kits I've seen so far.

    Any other good, reasonable tire choices in either 215/45/17 or 225/45/17? Thanks...
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    The MX6 is a 93 4 cyl 5 spd. Not a turbo. I wish I had found a 91-92 MX6 GT with the turbo. They weren't all that fast, but would've definitely been better than the barely adequate 2.0L 5 spd.

    Warpdrive, those vibrations, were they on 225/45/17s? Those are the tires offered by the i-club vendor.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    A friend who had 712s and switched to the HTRZIIs says they are much much better on the WRX than the 712s. When my Blowtenzas go on the WRX rims I own, the HTRZIIs will go on there most likely.

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Wow the '88 that I had was a 2.2, had some decent go power. I'd love to find a 88-92 GT turbo :)

    -mike
  • WarpDriveWarpDrive Posts: 506
    I can't remember, but they are on an Integra.

    See if you can make a stretch to RE730 Potenzas. Very good summer tire for a decent price albeit a bit noisy.
  • My 2002 Subaru WRX is due for its next oil change at 6,000. I know all about the distinct advantages of synthetic vs. dino oil (sheer stress at high temp, better flow at low temp, longer time to break down, etc.), but my question is in regard to potential gasket leaks.

    When shopping in my local Auto Barn, I noticed Mobil 1 came out with a new "formula" for older cars, in addition to their Tri-Synthetic formula. The new formula is supposed to help older cars with worn seals, and reduce leakage. This again got me thinking about some postings that indicated the Japanese cars are better of using regular dino oil, and just changing the oil more frequently (religiously at 3,000 miles). I am now thinking about doing just that, and avoiding the risk of future oil leaks.

    The $4 per quart vs. $1 per quart does not really matter to me. I would hate, however, to spend extra money and end up with a major engine repair due to gasket failures. I noticed that Mobil 1 does specifically mention on the container that it is formulated for European cars, and that it only "meets" the requirements for Japanese cars. All requirements for European cars are "exceeded" however.
    I drive my WRX fairly conservatively, probably compared to most of you. I rarely exceed 4K on the tach. Would regular dino oil hold up satisfactorily under these conditions, compared to racing to 6K?
    For winter oil changes, if using dino oil, is 5W/30 going to break down even faster than 10W/30, given the fact that the thinner oil may volatize easier at the temperatures the WRX engine runs?
    I'm sure you guys have lots of thoughts on these issues. Your feedback will be much appreciated!
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    You actually want a thicker oil in the summer and thinner in the winter. The reason is that when the oil gets cold in the winter it naturally thickens and thus flows less easily during startup, thinner oil helps this problem.

    -mike
  • WarpDriveWarpDrive Posts: 506
    Robert

    I'd stick to dino oil for the rest of the summer and then switch over. Dino oil is actually very much adequate and there is really no reason to switch over that early taking into account that conventional wisdom says the engine should be well broken in before switching.

    Going to synthetic is extra insurance in the case of extreme driving conditions or weather conditions, but since you are facing neither, I'd stick with normal oil for now. I definitely wouldn't try that "old car formulation" in a new car.
  • wrxguywrxguy Posts: 51
    I did change my oil to synthetic at 6,000. I have read sooo many pro and con posts on this subject. After to talking and reading I've come up definatly maybe.
    Most people generally agree to wait until your car has been "broken in." As to exactly how many miles that is seems to be an inconsistent answer. But id say that most of the replies have stated and or speculated that "break in period" is about 10,000 miles. So going on that presumption my 6,000 mile change over was pre-mature.

    Of course there is the other school that states the other sets of concerns/fears of the leaking of oil from seals. This concern, however from most that I've read and or heard is when the oil is switched at a much later date such as 100,000 miles.

    Happy motoring!
  • cinosweivecinosweive Posts: 166
    I put synthetic in my 1990 Honda starting at about 6000 miles. After 12 years and 130,000 miles, changing oil every 6000 or 7000 miles, it didn't loose a drop of oil between changes.
  • WarpDriveWarpDrive Posts: 506
    is probably over cautious. BUT it's always the matter of, it all depends on who you believe. Modern synthetics are much better now than when the 10000 mile rule was first postulated. German cars can come with synths from the factory. I prefer to take the conservative approach, after all, running dino oils for a longer interval is not going to ruin your engine either.
This discussion has been closed.