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Postwar Studebakers

1596062646581

Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,310
    edited February 2013
    They look similar, pontons are easy to confuse. There was the smaller 4cyl car, the larger 6cyl car, and a weird mix car, the 219, which was a 6cyl nose and engine on a 4cyl body. Kind of like the 230 fintail, which had the base 6cyl engine in a 4cyl W110 body.
  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,404
    I'll be darned. I always thought that the 219 was a decontented 220. You learn something new every day. You are a veritable fount of Mercedes information, Fin.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,310
    I know a little, but don't consider myself a real expert :shades:

    It was an unloved model, too.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    edited February 2013
    ...of my favorite Studebaker model of all (not necessarily this color, but equipment-wise, yes):

    http://www.autominded.net/brochure/studebaker/64%20Stude%2020.jpg

    There was one that looked, and was equipped, just like this at the Hershey show several years back, and his paperwork from the Studebaker National Museum showed it was built for the Auto Show circuit and was an early serial number. Beautiful supercharged, Powershift, disc brake example.

    The hood was tricky--inside release, pull it before lifting up, and the big chrome grille and surround was attached to the hood and went up with it, looking like Jerry Lewis in "The Nutty Professor" when open! ;)
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    my favorite model year of all, for Studebaker, and the last built in the U.S.:

    http://www.autominded.net/brochure/studebaker/64%20Stude%2019.jpg
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    http://www.autominded.net/brochure/studebaker/64%20Stude%2021.jpg

    The other pages are all mechanical drawings, not as dramatic as photos I think.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?68805-62-Lark-in-My-Three-- - Sons-Episode

    I don't like how the Lark owner seems like such a phony, but the car is interesting and I'm surprised with Pontiac sponsoring the show, a Lark is featured so prominently. Guess by '67 Studebaker couldn't complain much.

    The Lark must be a four-speed by the way the father reaches to the floor to shift.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    I'm surprised with Pontiac sponsoring the show, a Lark is featured so prominently.

    I do not know who sponsored that show in 1967 because it had a run of more than ten years, but in the early years it was sponsored by Chevrolet. I remember that because at the end of the show the credits would run with different Chevrolets driving down the road as seen below.

    image
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    I remember always seeing light blue metallic Pontiac Catalina Safari wagons from '65 through at least '68 as the Douglas' family car. In the early '70's, I seem to remember seeing Mercury wagons so the sponsorship must have changed. I'm thinking the show changed networks in the last couple years of programming (it went off the air in '72).
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,310
    Some of these might be past the project car stage:

    50 Studebakers lost in fire
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    I heard about that. Sad. I haven't read much about it; I'll have to do that.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    A sad situation. It reminds me of the tornado that ripped through Jon Myers garage and storage reported here earlier.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    edited February 2013
    I'm loving this, because I've never seen a '64 Stude commercial before...'63's, yes, but not '64's.

    I know the base Studebaker line was the one extensively restyled for '64, but not a mention of the Hawk, Avanti, or full truck line in this commercial though.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_S0RMN6NWM

    I'm assuming that's the Proving Ground track about 15 miles west of South Bend on U.S. 2. I've driven my old white '63 Lark Daytona Skytop R1 on that three-mile track once....at a meet there. It was great fun. The Proving Ground is operated by Bosch now.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    Here's one that includes the Avanti, but not Hawk nor trucks:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kww0lKx-xjE

    I know this was probably filmed in August '63, but I'm astounded at the mismatch of the shade of color on the LF fender of that four-door sedan! ;)
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    I suspect that there are very few 1964 commercials because Studebaker may have decided to stop its sponsorship of the Mr. ED TV show, which lasted until 1966. The television season and the model year both begin in September, so Studebaker would have committed to a 9 month TV season if it intended to sponsor the show for the 1964 season there should be more commercials. I do not find it unusual that they have a commercial that is only about Larks. I have seen many of those.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    You're probably right about the connection to Mr. Ed for the '64 model year.

    Even the second commercial I posted shows the Avanti, but nothing about the Hawk or trucks.

    The second one seems to be very intent on showing the new square headlight enclosures on the Avanti.

    I think Studebaker did a great job on the '64's...modern styling, disc brakes available, dual master cylinder on the drum brakes, P-R-N-D-2-1 automatics available, superchargers, very nice interiors, full instrumentation, etc. IMHO only, park a Falcon or Valiant or Chevy II next to a '64 Studebaker and the Studebaker seems more contemporary by today's standards. I know that Automotive News overlayed a '77 Caprice when new, with a '64 Studebaker and interior-to-exterior proportions were pretty similar, although the four-door Stude's wheelbase was three inches shorter (the two-door, seven inches shorter).
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    7 1/2 min. silent film, showing the current Studebaker and M-B products on display, plus President Sherwood H. Egbert, puffing a cigar in places in the film, Chairman of the Board Clarence Francis, and even Andy Granatelli at about 3:12.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6LpuZEPzx4
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    edited February 2013
    I'm loving this, as I'd not seen this film before....obviously a promotional piece for Ashland Oil and Valvoline ("Studebaker Record Test Runs, Powered by Ashland Gasoline and Protected by Valvoline"). Not-very-subtle product placement at around 1:20, 2:02, and 2:14 (although I love the Studebaker Champ with whitewalls and "Hot Rod" magazine on the door at 2:14).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAYrKW1vxjc

    That Avanti in the video, number 9, was on prominent display at the Studebaker National Museum during the International Meet last summer, still wearing its Halibrand mag wheels and looking remarkably unchanged from this video.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,694
    edited March 2013
    What's the relationship between Studebaker and the BW automatic? Another board has a question, one poster indicating that Studebaker pretty much came up with their own AT after some discussions with BW. I though it was a BW transmission. :confuse:
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    edited March 2013
    Although I'm mostly interested in '60's Studebakers, my understanding is that Studebaker, in conjunction with B-W, developed their "Automatic Drive" in 1950, that had a lock-up torque converter like Packard's Ultramatic of the year before. I have read in more than one place that Ford wished to buy the Studebaker "Automatic Drive" but that Studebaker wouldn't sell--a dumb idea! By '56, when Studebaker's fortunes were failing, they began to buy B-W automatics (called "Flightomatic" by Studebaker) 'off the shelf', so to speak.

    When the Avanti was introduced, supposedly Studebaker worked in conjunction with B-W to come up with a 3-speed automatic that could be shifted manually through three forward speeds (quadrant PRND21). Supposedly that was an Avanti exclusive at the time of introduction--summer '62. Later, in the '63 model year, that trans was offered in Larks and Hawks too.

    Hope this helps a little.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,694
    Yep, helps a lot. Thanks!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    Here's some info from wikipedia that's basically the same as I said:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Drive
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    I agree with everything Uplanderguy said about the Studebaker Automatic drive that it developed with Borg Warner. My 1955 Commander has one of those and I wrote an earlier post about all the reasons I like it. Three speeds, starts in first gear, excellent gas mileage, air cooled etc.

    It was too expensive for Studebaker after their sales decreased, so they switched to the Ford automatic in 1956, but then the very same transmission that Studebaker developed with Borg Warner showed up in Mercedes Benz cars until approximately 1962. It was used in Jaguars too.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    A Cruiser, here it is:

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1966_Studebaker_Cruiser.jpg

    Options include white vinyl top, disc brakes, factory air, transistorized ignition, and 50/50 split front seats. It has a beautiful black brocade cloth interior with rear-seat center armrest.

    Immediately given to a Stude exec in South Bend to drive (although was built in Hamilton, Ontario), in 1969 Studebaker Corp. gave the car to the city of South Bend. It had just under 20K miles when I last looked inside of it.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited March 2013
    I read a story in Turning Wheels last year that said that Studebaker employees in Canada knew the end was near when management did not replace the stamp in the press that made the trunk lids after it wore out. The employees believed that production would stop then they ran out of trunk lids and that is what happened. Studebaker kept building cars after 1964 until they had to make a major investment.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    I remember reading that article too. The '64-66 does have a complex trunk lid shape from the rear--multiple bends and surfaces. I don't ever remember Newman and Altman having '64-66 trunk lids, when they had '62-63 coming out the you-know-what, and earlier lids as well.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    I got two interesting E-mails from my Studebaker website at www. Stude.net over the weekend.

    The first one I received is about the Studebaker-Mercedes Benz connection. It is worth seeing. http://johnstraub.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-mercedes-studebaker-connection.html Many great photos and it seems like an interesting site. I will check it out more when I have the time.

    The second one was from a girl named Gina who claims to be a descendant of Clem Studebaker and is seeking information about the Studebaker family. I sent her info about a web site that is all about Studebaker family http://www.studebakerfamily.org/
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,310
    Neat article! Love the 300SL assembly pics, swoon.

    I like the look of this dealership a lot, I could see my fintail there:

    image

    And speaking of assembly line pics, I like this one - somehow makes me think of the opening sequence in "Christine":

    image
  • bhill2bhill2 Posts: 1,404
    And speaking of assembly line pics, I like this one - somehow makes me think of the opening sequence in "Christine"

    Fin, you have a truly twisted sense of humor. I respect you for that.

    2009 BMW 335i, 2003 Corvette cnv, 2001 Jaguar XK cnv, 1985 MB 380SE (the best of the lot)

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