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Postwar Studebakers

18687899192120

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited January 2013
    Found a pic of Richard Vaux and his very authentic '64 Avanti in Turquoise, image no. 32:

    http://www.hemmings.com/hmn/stories/2011/10/01/hmn_feature6.html#PhotoSwipe13586- 84666982

    I know they're not practical, but I love seeing bias-plys on old cars!
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    Here is an excellent slide show of the white Studebaker Avanti owned by Dick Van [non-permissible content removed]. http://www.examiner.com/slideshow/dick-van-[non-permissible content removed]-s-studebaker-avanti-at-los-angel- es-county-art-museum . It seems to have his original California license plates on it. It has the burgundy red interior. The one I owned looked just like it.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I knew that Dick Van [non-permissible content removed] had owned an Avanti, and a clip I've seen of him at Stan Laurel's funeral ('65 I believe) shows him climbing into a Jaguar XK-E.

    I've said this before, but I wish they would've put the smallest emblem on the front fender of the R1 Avanti. My eyes are always drawn right there. I like the small 'Supercharged' emblems the R2's have there.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,502
    At least 50K into a restoration anyway, plus price of original car. It's not common for relatively affordable cars (five figures anyway) to make money in restoration.

    The round lights remind me of owl's eyes, but the square lights remind me of 70s era cars.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    "For a long time, I didn't like the square glass headlight covers of the '64 model or the woodgrain wheel and trim inside. . ."

    I have changed my mind back and forth on whether I like round or square head light covers better. On one hand, the Avanti-X and reproductions seem to favor the round headlights, on the other hand, the square headlights had more influence on cars that came later, as shown by the example below:

    image
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 693
    That Merkur is more Ford of Europe influence and not so much domestic inspiration. Although the 1939 Mopars may have been the first big Detroit nameplates to do square headlights.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Richard Carpenter has a black '63 R2 Avanti. I like the Avanti in black but they are rarely seen. They made them for a while, then discontinued it and replaced the color with Avanti Grey (charcoal), and later reintroduced black as a $35 option (supposedly more work involved in getting a decent fiberglass finish in black). Mr. Carpenter's car is a fairly early specimen without the grille below the front bumper (but being black, hides it better than the lighter color cars IMHO):

    http://www.richardandkarencarpenter.com/Auto-14%201963%20Studebaker%20Avanti.htm-
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited January 2013
    I selected an image of a Ford-Mercury Merkur because it looks so much like an Avanti with the square headlights and no chrome grille in front. If the Merkur looks like some other car from the early 1960s, I would like to know what that car is. Maybe I should have chosen an image of a 1986 Buick Skyhawk (I wonder what might have inspired that name?).

    image

    If you go back far enough, you can find an early example of any type of design that somebody did, but few took notice and it did not catch on at the time. For example, the overhead camshaft engine was first used in an 1898 Wilkinson, so I guess we should all thank Mr. Wilkinson for that idea or we would now all be driving around in vehicles that have flathead, and/or OHV engines. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_automotive_superlatives
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,502
    I am not a big fan of black cars, as it is such a PITA to keep clean, and shows every flaw. Was there a nice light-medium blue for older Avantis?
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    Was there a nice light-medium blue for older Avantis?

    I agree that black and dark blue cars are hard to keep clean. Ian Flemming ordered a black one and it took a lot of time to finish the paint and body. Dealers were discouraged from ordering them in that color.

    The only blue for Avantis was the light aqua blue one shown in the earlier post for Avantis, but I like that color, and it was popular
    image

    After seeing that picture again, I am back to favoring the round headlights over the square ones.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,502
    Oh, that's perfect, that's what I would pick. Nice wide whites, too.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Actually, that car's probably a pre-production model, as Avantis weren't built with wide whites, but with narrow-white Firestone 500's. My Daytona R1 was built with optional Firestone 500's too per the build sheet.

    "Avanti Turquoise" is probably my overall favorite Avanti color, with black being second.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited January 2013
    The Motor Trend Magazine is dated July 1962, which means is was probably published in June based on information available in May. The rear view mirrior is not the one used in production either. Before production began Studebaker decided to glue a small one to the windshield, and others followed that idea. The magazine cover marks the point in time when wide white walls were becoming obsolete.

    It seemed that Studebaker was getting the early jump on the competiton with the early release of the Avanti, but with the early production problems, that advantage turned into a liability. It was a case of bad timing with the first Sting Ray and Buick Riveria being introduced the same model year. Avanti production did not reach its highest point until January-February 1963, and it was downhill after that.

    The Chrysler Airflow and Cord 810 had similar stories. Early introduction of a radically different car at a New York auto show, big publicity followed by few cars to sell. Ford did not make that mistake with the first Mustang introduced two years after the Avanti.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,502
    I was thinking maybe Stude used wide whites late, as MB did - through model year 1964. But for something new and fresh like an Avanti, they had plenty of reason to adapt the new style.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited January 2013
    I was thinking maybe Stude used wide whites late, as MB did - through model year 1964

    Sorry, but I don't think that happened. If it happened at all, it happened very early because I do not believe Studebaker delivered cars with wide white wall tires in 1963. I collected plenty of literature and factory photos of Avantis during my 45 years in the Studebaker Drivers Club, (I joined when I was 15 years old) but the only time I saw a wide white wall tires from the era when they were built was on the cover of Motor Trend Magazine. I have seen a few being shipped with black wall tires, but that was rare. Just Google "Factory images of 1963 Studebaker Avanti" and you will see Avanti’s almost always looking like this.

    image

    I believe that if you took an Avanti to a Studebaker meet with wide whitewall tires, the judges would take off points. What do you say Uplanderguy? I really like the look of those Avantis and am back to lovin' the round headlight covers.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited January 2013
    Stude's '62 Larks and Hawks and Champ pickups were the last to use the wider whitewalls. In '63 they went to a narrow band. Most of the U.S. industry went to narrow whites in the '62 model year.

    JL, I have a book with that very pic in it. I'd love to just saunter through that room with today's money and pick one out to bring back with me! I heard that when South Bend shut down (Dec. '63), there were new Studes of all models, body styles, and engines and options in storage lots around the city. How'd I love to pick an Avanti, Daytona convertible, Gran Turismo Hawk, Champ 1/2 ton long-bed pickup, and one-ton Diesel Transtar to bring back with me. Ah, it's sweet to dream! I was only 5 1/2 when that shutdown occurred, and my Dad never looked at Studebakers, that I know! ;)

    I'm convinced that at a Studebaker Drivers' Club meet, one would lose points in judging with an Avanti with wide whites.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    edited January 2013
    This image of the Avanti was one of the earliest that was issued in Aptil 1962 to introduce the Avanti to the public. It is so early that the car has no rear view mirriors and the Avanti script on the front has been added to the image. Motor Trend got it wrong when they put the wide white walls on the Avantis on the cover of the magazine. It's just that simple.
    image

    I am adding this to my post. An expert can tell within a three or four month period of time when an Avanti was built by the location and size of the rear view mirrior stuck on the windshield. It started out too small and located too low, then the size increased, then they moved it higher, then they increased the size again and seemed to move it down a bit. I have seen so many variations. Mine was built in February 1963 and it had the larger mirrior but located too low to see out the back window very well. My friend had one that had a smaller mirrior and located even lower on the windshield.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,502
    Oh yeah, I am not doubting the actual production car never wore wide whites - I was just saying if it did, it might be linked to the MB connection, as Stude and MB had their little connection back then. The car looks too modern for wide whites anyway, kind of like early E-types I have seen wearing them, it looks odd.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,045
    >within a three or four month period of time when an Avanti was built by the location and size of the rear view mirrior stuck on the windshield.

    That's interesting. I enjoy all the info about these cars.
  • jljacjljac Posts: 649
    JL, I have a book with that very pic in it.

    What is the name of that book? I must have missed that one. I just found that image today looking for factory photos with tires to show they were never wide whitewalls. I would like a book with more of those photos. I looked at that image quite a few times today still amazed at the beautiful lines of that car.
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