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Tire Age?

dakmtbdakmtb Posts: 1
edited August 17 in Honda
So, the topic of tire age has been in the news recently. We recently purchased four new tires for our Pilot/ The stamp on the side wall indicates that they were manufactured in April of 08. That means they are close to 2.5 years old at the time of purchase. Should we be concerned with this and request newer tires? Thoughts are appreciated.

Comments

  • steverstever Ex Yooper, en route to New MexicoPosts: 40,506
    Haven't seen the news article but there is some concern about stale tires. Six to ten years seems to be recommendation; tires older than that could be of concern. A lot depends on how the tires were stored in the warehouse before they were sent to your tire dealer.

    Here's a post from the main "tires" discussion here.

    capriracer, "Tires, tires, tires" #5283, 24 Jan 2006 3:58 pm

    And the TireRack has a couple of tire aging articles:

    Tire Aging – Part #1

    Tire Aging – Part #2

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  • capriracercapriracer Somewhere in the USPosts: 795
    Anything within 3 years of production can be considered "New". But if you got a good deal on them, it might have been because they were getting close to that point, and the reduced price reflects the age of the tire.

    The only time I would be concerned about tires that are sold as "New" that are less than 3 years old would be if they were stored outside in the sun or in an outside storage container where the temperature would be allowed to build.
  • I read article #1. The following section has been lifted (copy and paste).

    The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."

    "Environmental conditions like exposure to sunlight and coastal climates, as well as poor storage and infrequent use, accelerate the aging process. In ideal conditions, a tyre may have a life expectancy that exceeds ten years from its date of manufacture. However, such conditions are rare. Aging may not exhibit any external indications and, since there is no non-destructive test to assess the serviceability of a tyre, even an inspection carried out by a tyre expert may not reveal the extent of any deterioration."

    More recently, The Japan Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association (JATMA) recommended practice issued May, 2005, states "customers are encouraged to have their vehicle tires promptly inspected after five years of use to determine if the tires can continue to be used (recommends spare tires be inspected as well). Furthermore, even when the tires look usable, it is recommended that all tires (including spare tires) that were made more than ten years ago be replaced with new tires. Additionally, because in some cases automobile makers--based on the characteristics of the relevant vehicle--stipulate in the owner's manual the timing of tire inspection and replacement. Please read and confirm the content of the owner's manual."

    Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.

    The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."

    "Environmental conditions like exposure to sunlight and coastal climates, as well as poor storage and infrequent use, accelerate the aging process. In ideal conditions, a tyre may have a life expectancy that exceeds ten years from its date of manufacture. However, such conditions are rare. Aging may not exhibit any external indications and, since there is no non-destructive test to assess the serviceability of a tyre, even an inspection carried out by a tyre expert may not reveal the extent of any deterioration."

    More recently, The Japan Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association (JATMA) recommended practice issued May, 2005, states "customers are encouraged to have their vehicle tires promptly inspected after five years of use to determine if the tires can continue to be used (recommends spare tires be inspected as well). Furthermore, even when the tires look usable, it is recommended that all tires (including spare tires) that were made more than ten years ago be replaced with new tires. Additionally, because in some cases automobile makers--based on the characteristics of the relevant vehicle--stipulate in the owner's manual the timing of tire inspection and replacement. Please read and confirm the content of the owner's manual."

    Several European vehicle manufacturers of high performance sports cars, coupes and sedans identify that "under no circumstances should tires older than 6 years be used" in their vehicle owner's manual. However, it should be noted that European recommendations must include driving conditions that include roads like the German Autobahn, which allows vehicles to be legally driven at their top speeds for extended periods of time.
This discussion has been closed.