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2012 Ford Focus

1565759616266

Comments

  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    Don't let any of the clutch-pedal purists hear you call a DCT (dual clutch transmission) a manual. They call it an automatic because it doesn't have a clutch pedal.

    Actually, it isn't properly a manual. Manuals are manual. It's not an automatic either. It's a DCT. They're unique, as you've pointed out.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,666
    They are more alike internally though. A DCT uses direct mesh gears just like a manual and it has a clutch instead of a torque converter.

    It would be more accurate to call it a computer controlled manual as opposed to a driver controlled manual.
  • ivan_99ivan_99 Posts: 1,663
    So, of course it rolls back on hills. Manuals do that.

    Some manuals have 'hill-hold' like the VW's...

    Always one in the crowd :)
  • ivan_99ivan_99 Posts: 1,663
    It would be more accurate to call it a computer controlled manual as opposed to a driver controlled manual.

    An automatic manual transmission; as opposed to some automatic transmissions that you can manually control the gears :blush:
  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,626
    edited September 2012
    Is it an automatic with 2 pedals or a manual with 3 pedals? If it's a 2 pedal auto tranny, something seems strange. I know the Focus with the 2 pedal auto I drove a few months ago just didn't feel right...really felt the 5 speed auto in my Civic felt smoother. And this isn't the first post I've read where someone has complained about the auto in the Focus.

    What gives...and does Ford have a fix in the works? I did really like the SEL hatch that I drove with the leather...but didn't like the auto tranny.

    The Sandman :) :sick: :shades:

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    It's a dual-clutchless automanualatic.
  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,626
    In cars for dummies terms, how many pedals are there?

    The Sandman :confuse: :sick: :shades:

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • ivan_99ivan_99 Posts: 1,663
    2

    Auto should always be 2...even if the tranny really is a manual being automatically controlled.

    I love the auto/manual (is it?) debate...sort of like the "who's on first" routine :)
  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,952
    Really should be no debate as they are both good. People should stop trying to shove either one down other people's throat. If someone wants one or the other I say just buy it and shut up.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,666
    From a driver's perspective it's an automatic. But from a technical standpoint it's a computer controlled manual. The latter is important for understanding how it feels and how it works. There is no torque converter so the computer has to operate the clutch when you stop and go. The software is just now able to do it somewhat smoothly. The first ones in the Ferraris and other exotics were terrible. The software will continue to get better and better with each iteration. Ford has put out 2 new software releases that are supposed to make it smoother but it will never be as smooth as a torque converter. Also - the DCT that Ford used in the Focus is a dry clutch unit as opposed to a wet clutch unit which is smoother but more expensive and not as fuel efficient.

    The tradeoff is fuel efficiency and faster manual shifting.
  • ivan_99ivan_99 Posts: 1,663
    Agreed, I drove the auto and 5spd manual (the one with 3 pedals :) ). While I liked the 5 speed better...it wasn't a 6 speed and it gets a bit busy-feeling when going 85-90 mph (TX roads...).

    I didn't have the problems with the automatic that others were feeling...but I drove a few VW DSG's and corrected one of my "faults". I had a tendency to lift the gas a bit just before the shifts occurred (old habits of driving manual...) this caused it to have a jerky feeling. After I made a conscious effort to keep the gas at a consistent rate it was all smoothed out.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Well, I am going on 9,000 miles. I am averaging per the computer 35.4MPG. I cannot complain, its an automatic. Most of the time I drive it like an old man. However, the real reason I am writing this is because of how much I really like the manu-shift option on this car. I was a bit hesitant at first to try it and waited until just a few days ago to give it a whirl. One word, FUN. The car acts totally different when in the "S" mode on the automatic. You can hold the revs up pretty high to about 4K in each gear then shift with the button. The car is actually pretty quick. I am told in other forums to go to redline and the car is quicker. However I am chicken and don't want to hurt a new car. So far no complaints, great little car. Ford of Europe needs to teach Ford of America how to build great small cars..
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,666
    Just so you know - when Ford rolls a car off the assembly line they go WOT to test it. You won't hurt it.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Honda losses to Ford! My mother and Father in law went car shopping. They don't care about buying American, or are they brand loyal. They shopped all the small cars from EVERY manufacturer. They chose a Ford Focus 4 door sedan SEL automatic. The reasons were numerous. They loved the interior touch, feel and quality. They felt the engine was quiet and had enough power. The car handled better than anything they drove. They traded in their 2005 Honda Civic.
  • creakid1creakid1 Posts: 2,032
    edited October 2012
    "Fun is a debatable point here. The new Golf certainly corners neatly and has high levels of mechanical grip, with a torque vectoring system to reduce nose-on understeer. But in terms of fun, it ranks alongside cutting your toenails. There’s no feedback to the steering wheel, so it feels inert. Lift off the throttle in a bend and the nose barely registers. They’ve even taken out the mechanical hand brake—so no fun there, either. Hackenberg promises that the R-Line models will have more spirited chassis, and that the GTI and its 190-hp diesel counterpart, the GTD, will be barnstormers...Where VW missed the mark is with its inability or unwillingness to improve the driver appeal of the standard car. Modern electronics and steering systems can do so much, yet the Golf feels stodgy compared with the Ford Focus."

    Read more: 2014 Volkswagen Golf Test Drive - Popular Mechanics
  • Has anyone here been experiencing the infamous front-end clunk with their new/newish Focus?
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    edited October 2012
    I found a 2013 SE hatch with a stick (actually 2 of them) at my local dealer today, so I took one out for a test-drive as I am trying to narrow down my list of suspects for my next car. The ride and handling were as good as I remembered from my test drive last year. The stick is a pleasure to use, albeit only with 5 forward speeds.

    However, I have eliminated the Focus from my shopping list, for the following reasons;

    * Driver's seat wasn't comfortable: no matter how I adjusted it, it never fit me well. If I raised the seat bottom, the seat tilted forward so my thighs didn't get enough support. If I lowered the seat for good thigh support, it was too low for my taste.
    * Tight rear seat: I've noticed before that the rear leg room is pretty tight, so I tried it again today. My legs brushed the seat back and there wasn't good thigh support. Not something I need to live with given there's choices (Golf, Elantra GT) with more rear leg room.
    * No 6th gear: Not an issue in itself, but 5th is geared pretty short, so engine revs are pretty high, e.g. about 2700 rpm at 65 mph. That's much higher than the Mazda3i (closer to 2000 rpms @ 65), Elantra GT, and even the Golf which also has a 5-speed. Higher rpms translates to lower FE and more engine noise.
    * Confusing controls: The center stack is bad enough, but even the sales rep couldn't show me how to reset and display the FE meter. We messed with it for awhile, then gave up.

    So looks like it will come down to the Mazda3, Golf, or Elantra GT. The Golf has the big advantage on price as it's available as a CPO car for thousands less than a new Mazda3i hatch or Elantra GT.

    P.S. No sign of a front suspension "clunk" on my test drive.
  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,626
    Agree with you on the seats...very uncomfortable. Drove a SEL leather model and just felt so uncomfortable...and couldn't get the seat contorted to where it got any better. The center stack was a bit confusing also...much prefer the simplicity of the Elantra or the Jetta.

    The Sandman :) :sick: :shades:

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • creakid1creakid1 Posts: 2,032
    Good point. Choose from the list of cheapest cars. Only fools would bother w/ the expensive ones :P
  • creakid1creakid1 Posts: 2,032
    edited October 2012
    * Driver's seat wasn't comfortable: no matter how I adjusted it, it never fit me well. If I raised the seat bottom, the seat tilted forward so my thighs didn't get enough support. If I lowered the seat for good thigh support, it was too low for my taste.

    That's what I hate about newer cars these days, as if you are forced to get the expensive overweight motorized seats in order to tilt the thigh angle, such as the Mazda3. (Don't I miss the manual driver seat from the Volvo S40/V50, '99-00 Civic EX, old Camry LE/SE...)

    Ditto (somewhat) w/ the Golf 2.5 I just purchased. But the problem is solved after I added the wood-bead seat-center cover. The seat is lowered in order to correct the angle, then this cushion-like thick cover raised it back to the desired height. This tapered-shape cover also creates some lumbar support, & supplements the "now too low" factory lumbar hand in hand. It also seems quite OK that the lateral support is reduced, as the U.S.-spec Golf already has GTI seats to begin with.

    The front seats in the '12 Focus SE non-Sport also lack decent lateral support compare to ones in the SE Sport. I wonder if all '13 Focus cloth seats no longer have that lateral support?

    At the LA Autoshow, I actually fell in love w/ ST's Recaro cloth seat! & it probably has a stronger thigh angle as well.

    Ford should offer these Recaro's as an option on the Focus sedan. Only those who like hard ride would really go for the ST:

    "The ST’s suspension was very communicative, and added a lot to the sporty character and driving dynamics, whether driving in a straight line or pushing it through corners. When headed in a singular direction, the stiff suspension transmits an enormous amount of information about the road surface into the cabin. It reacts to every bump and irregularity in the road, and moves along with it. When travelling over regularly spaced expansion joints or frost heaves, the Focus ST can exhibit a little hobby-horse behavior. It doesn’t make the car feel unstable or unready to react like it would in a luxury car or SUV that was “porpoising” due to softness in the suspension. This still felt sharp on its toes, just bouncy and rigid. It fits the ST’s personality, though; if you weren’t looking to put up with a taught ride, you could simply stick with the standard Focus, or shop elsewhere. This is meant to be communicative, and it is.

    In corners, the suspension didn’t feel too brittle. When throwing lateral motion into the equation, the suspension didn’t get upset. The car remained stable, and very flat. It also never showed a tendency to skip like a stone across the pavement, as we’ve experienced in other cars with stiff suspensions (here’s looking at you, Mini). It served to keep the Focus balanced, while informing the driver of what was going on between rubber and road. We felt every bit confident in this car’s stability as we pushed it through turns."

    & do you need all that power?

    "The only drawback of the strong power delivery in the Focus ST was that it exhibited a lot of torque steer. Combined with the snappy steering, it made it a bit difficult to remain pointed dead ahead under wide-open throttle. Approaching the engine’s redline, we felt nervous to take our right hand off the wheel to reach over and prepare to shift."

    * No 6th gear: Not an issue in itself, but 5th is geared pretty short, so engine revs are pretty high, e.g. about 2700 rpm at 65 mph. That's much higher than the Mazda3i (closer to 2000 rpms 65), Elantra GT, and even the Golf which also has a 5-speed. Higher rpms translates to lower FE and more engine noise.

    The extinction of the reliable Japanese-made slushbox (as oppose to the nightmare-ish DSG) from VW actually made me collected the Golf w/ the 6-speed auto, which made this 5-cyl car leaping off the line like a V8 when 1st gear was selected in manual-shift mode. The 5-speed stick Golf can't even come close! I also doubt if those 4-cyl GTI/R 6-speed stick w/ turbo lag can achieve this :D But then, this "muscle car"-like performance also translates into mpg -- alway in the low 20's combined. But then, the direct-injected diesel Golf has leaking fuel injectors!

    * Confusing controls: The center stack is bad enough, but even the sales rep couldn't show me how to reset and display the FE meter. We messed with it for awhile, then gave up.

    Awhile? It takes less than awhile fiddling w/ the read outs before you crash.
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