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Truly safe?

Karen@EdmundsKaren@Edmunds Posts: 5,028
edited January 3 in General
What car safety policies would you like to see implemented? Are there any current car safety laws you'd like to see repealed? We look forward to hearing your thoughts on the myths and realities of car safety.

Karen-Edmunds Community Manager

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Comments

  • no shaving, putting on makeup or changing wigs during driving. :shades:

    2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,669
    would do SO MUCH MORE for driver safety that any changes in car safety policies or laws, it's just not funny.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,887
    edited December 2010
    That's exactly it...the greatest problem out there isn't vehicle design or money-seeking laws...it is the foundation of driver training and licensing standards. When a foundation is bad, whatever is built on top of it will also have problems.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,011
    edited December 2010
    I also agree 100%. I remember the first time I heard someone say that they couldn't buy a RWD car because they needed to be able to drive in the rain. I honestly thought they were joking, but unfortunately it now seems that most drivers are that incompetent- or worse.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • fezofezo Posts: 9,195
    Short of mandatory REAL driving instruction can we wrap ourselves up in bubble wrap and hope for the best?
  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    What car safety policies would you like to see implemented

    Mandatory wrapping of all occupants of a motor vehicle in: bubble wrap, egg crates, and those little foam peanuts. It's the only way!
  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,346
    You hit it right outta the park with this. As with the others I absolutely agree.
    I would even take it another step, and while minimum guidelines are being set out as to what those changes would be in driver licensing, I would make it mandatory they learn how to get their license driving a stick shift.

    And part of the test would be to do a parallel park, on a steep hill, and all without excessive clutch slippage. And enforce that little tidbit vehemently.

    If after passing the test, they choose to drive and own an automatic, well, so be it...unfortunately. I say unfortunately, because a manual lets an owner 'retain' those skills mile after mile, year after year, rather than become complacent with the less interactive familiarity of an auto. A manual forces you to be more interactive with your car more than any other aspect of the driving dynamic. It's right up there with steering.
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 3,999
    edited January 2011
    Yes, along those lines:
    - Fair and equal enforcement of all highway laws, not just speed limits. This would include writing tickets for offenses such as not signaling a lane change, cutting someone off, driving in the left lane, or stopping on the side of the interstate without turning on your hazard lights.
    - Wipers on/headlights on law.
    - No foglights on except when conditions warrant.
    - No driving with parking lamps on.
    - Side turn signal repeaters required on all vehicles. Rear signals must be amber, not red.
    - No unmuffled exhaust brakes.
    - No exhausts (OEM, aftermarket, or rusted out) that exceed a certain sound level. No "fart can" mufflers.
    - Owners and riders of motorcycles with straight pipes shall be drawn and quartered.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,118
    edited January 2011
    I passed my driving test on a stick shift car, my wife and children can drive manual transmission cars well, and one of the cars in our garage is a manual. However, I disagree with you about making it a requirement, and your reasoning. I've ridden with some excellent drivers who only drive automatics. Heck, most U.S. drivers today have no reasonable opportunity to drive a manual transmission.
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    edited January 2011
    - Fair and equal enforcement of all highway laws, not just speed limits. This would include writing tickets for offenses such as not signaling a lane change, cutting someone off, driving in the left lane, or stopping on the side of the interstate without turning on your hazard lights.
    Dunno what state you are in, but the state I am in, left lane driving, except for passing will net you a hefty ticket on most highways in the state. Cutting someone off, will net a careless driving ticket or in some severe cases, a road rage fine. The only one I do not agree with is the stopping with out turning on hazards. If you have an electrical failure, you might not be able to turn them on and being fined for that is ridiculous. But, in our state, if you park on the side of the road in an unsafe manner, you might be fined or if the vehicle is left, it may possibly be towed at the owner's expense.

    - Wipers on/headlights on law.
    So you want wipers on all the time? A little extreme, don't ya think?
    If you are referring to weather, there would be a grey area there. If the intermittents are on, how do you prove the weren't. Silly laws cost taxpayers money.
    BTW, there is laws in most states that currently dictate that headlights be on between certain times of dusk and dawn.

    - Side turn signal repeaters required on all vehicles. Rear signals must be amber, not red.
    Federal laws already address this and the costs of studies to change those federal laws would hardly be worth any "supposed" safety increase.
    And are you referring to mid mounted turn signals on cars when you say repeaters? If so, no one uses turn signals anyway, so how would that increase safety. It would only be an added expense on already expensive vehicles.

    No unmuffled exhaust brakes.
    There are very few heavy trucks on the road with unmuffled exhaust brakes anymore. Post 80 heavy trucks are required to have a muffler.
    Don't confuse loud exhaust/jake brakes with unmuffled.

    - Owners and riders of motorcycles with straight pipes shall be drawn and quartered.
    Most of the exhaust problems are usually addressed by city noise ordinances. If your city does not have such an ordinance, then that is something to take up with them. There are federal laws for such a thing, but are generally not that easily enforceable.
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    edited January 2011
    In some Scandinavian countries, drivers go through some pretty rigorous training before the get a "full" license. The US could learn a few things from them on that.

    I see a lot of accidents and a lot of them are from driver error from either lack of experience, lack of attention or ignorance.
    Govt continues to pass laws and create safety "protection" to protect people.

    Freedom to decide is becoming a thing of the past, only because there are those who, like those about the turn signal colors, seem to think that adding safety items will be a good substitute for proper learning.
    Just my opinion.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,669
    Dunno what state you are in, but the state I am in, left lane driving, except for passing will net you a hefty ticket on most highways in the state. Cutting someone off, will net a careless driving ticket or in some severe cases, a road rage fine.

    I am sooo jealous!!!!! Tell me what state you are in and I will abandon California post-haste!

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • Curious why you want no foglights? They are too low to bother oncoming traffic and greatly improve visibility directly in front of the car.
  • oregonboyoregonboy Posts: 1,653
    I think that he lives in Fantasy-Land. I am unaware of any state in the US of A that makes such enforcement a priority. :P :sick:
  • I'm wondering if others have noticed the sudden proliferation of people driving with their high beams on? Some do it because they are too cheap to replace a burned out low beam and are trying to avoid getting pulled over for a headlight being out. But others do it just to do it, completely blinding everyone and refusing to turn them off when flashed. It has gotten completely out of hand in the Orlando, FL area and cops don't seem to be doing anything about it. They worry more about speeding or a brake light being out than people flat out blinding other drivers.
  • oregonboyoregonboy Posts: 1,653
    Corvette... I like your list. You and I think alike on the subject.

    I would like to add citations for mis-aligned headlights, (after one warning), and for failure to dim high-beams, including on divided highways and when following another vehicle. Special (higher) rates for HID-equipped vehicles. :)
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 3,999
    I have no problem with fog lights when conditions warrant (rain, snow, or fog). The ones on many pickups (the Dodge Ram in particular) are high enough to bother oncoming traffic. Whether aftermarket lights are annoyance will depend on the quality of the installer.
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 3,999
    I agree completely about the equipment violations. Tickets should be written for burned out or damaged lamps, misaligned headlights, worn out exhaust, etc.
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 3,999
    ...left lane driving, except for passing will net you a hefty ticket on most highways in the state. Cutting someone off, will net a careless driving ticket or in some severe cases, a road rage fine. The only one I do not agree with is the stopping with out turning on hazards.

    You must live in some sort of Utopia if those laws are actually enforced as heavily as the speed limit in your area. It requires more work on the part of enforcement. Obviously, you can't turn on your hazards if your car's electrical system fails, but it should be a requirement in all other instances.

    If you are referring to weather, there would be a grey area there. If the intermittents are on, how do you prove the weren't. Silly laws cost taxpayers money.
    BTW, there is laws in most states that currently dictate that headlights be on between certain times of dusk and dawn.


    If it's cloudy enough to be raining, your headlights should be on. Many states have this law (and again, it's not enforced as well as it should be), but the signs on the interstate always say something like "wipers on, headlights on."

    And are you referring to mid mounted turn signals on cars when you say repeaters? If so, no one uses turn signals anyway, so how would that increase safety. It would only be an added expense on already expensive vehicles.

    Yes, that's what I'm referring to. The European Union has required them for a long time--it's about time we caught up. As for the fact that most people are jerks who don't use their turn signals, see my thoughts above about how traffic enforcement in the US tends to focus on the idea that "speed kills" while almost completely ignoring any other type of highway infraction.

    If your city does not have such an ordinance, then that is something to take up with them.

    Not everyone lives or works within city limits, and there are many residential areas in the US which fall outside city limits. That doesn't mean that their hearing isn't worth saving. And again, I rarely hear (no pun intended) of someone receiving a ticket for a loud exhaust.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,887
    You're right on pretty much everything. In terms of lighting, big trucks and SUVs are almost always the worst offenders. Aiming standards need to be enforced.

    I do find the idea of "taking something up with the city" in terms of ridiculous noise to be funny - cities move slower and more wastefully than other venues, guaranteed cronyism at work. It's not so easy. None of this will happen until the change from revenue (speed) based law enforcement takes place.
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