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Truly safe?

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  • fezofezo Posts: 9,329
    Yeah, my wife's 07 Camry is like that. She's used to it but more than once I've gotten in the car, started it up and never even thought about turning on the lights because the dashboard was lit up. A real "Doh!" moment. :blush:
  • I have 2 hondas with that type of guages. You are right that you don't get the normal feedback to tell you your lights are not on. But, you do get used to looking for the little green "lights on" indicator. Still, much more common to forget to turn your headlights on with this type of dash.

    This is a very real issue...daylight lit clusters should be tied to automatic headlamps that go on at dusk or when the wipers are activated. My father's Infiniti G35 does this while our Subaru Legacy doesn't...guess which car runs around with dim headlamps and no tail-lamps at dusk/dark?
  • imscfimscf Posts: 34
    I'd like to bring back the '80's rule that speedometers are restricted to showing 85 mph maximum. My 2010 Honda Accord's speedometer now shows max 160 mph. Why such a high limit? where can anyone drive even close to that limit legally? when going at the speed limits 60-70 mph, it's not even at the half-way mark!
    Another point, some years ago there was a proposal by George Bush I that we were going metric (like Canada where the speed limit on highways is 100 kmh, equal to 62 mph). That rule was killed by Bill Clinton soon after he became president. We're the only county in the world still using miles!
  • corvettecorvette United StatesPosts: 4,094
    edited January 2011
    The United Kingdom still uses miles on road signs and car odometers. I think the short-lived Pontiac G8 had a nonlinear speedometer where the spacing was larger from 0-80 MPH or something like that.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189
    Makes no sense to me either.

    Metric proposals have been around since Jefferson. There was a big push bacvk when Canada converted but the U.S. Metric Board was disbanded under the Reagan administration in '85 due to lack of Congressional and public support. Efforts since then have flopped too.

    All speed limits and distances are still given in miles or miles per hour in Britain.

    I'm on the hunt right now for some 15mm bar stock for my miter slot in my table saw.

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,381
    I'd like to bring back the '80's rule that speedometers are restricted to showing 85 mph maximum. My 2010 Honda Accord's speedometer now shows max 160 mph. Why such a high limit? where can anyone drive even close to that limit legally? when going at the speed limits 60-70 mph, it's not even at the half-way mark!

    That was an absurd rule that had absolutely no impact on highway safety. It was a textbook example of the safety nanny "sounds good, let's make it a safety standard" idiocy that permeates the DOT bureaucracy. Speedometers should display the maximum speed of the vehicle plus 10-20 mph.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,591
    What's the point in that?

    Also, foreign cars were exempt...look at the gauges in a 1980s German car.

    USA won't go metric just out of spite.
  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,345
    Careful what you wish for..
    The oddest thing about USA measurement is the size of your gallon. It should be Imperial sized cuz it is out on its own.

    UK has been kph, then mph, then back to kph...are tey back to mph again now? I know they used to use Fahrenheit, then Celsius and I think they are still using Celsius now?

    Back in 78 when Cda went metric, it was the biggest hoohaw ever. Aside from the tremendous financial manipulation/loss/costs, (just think road signage. Plus... our 'quart' immediately lost 54 ml even though the price at the time of 99 cents a quart, immediately became 99 cents a litre while our gvt peed in our ears proclaiming not to worry, it was only water, and many other examples too) people actually lost their lives due to incorrect administered amounts of meds in hospitals and roadside emergency services.

    I always felt that Cda didn't need to go metric until the USA did, and with any luck I'd be dead when that happened..I constantly have to convert to Imp measure in order to 'know where I'm at'. I can think in litres (in both USA and Imp amounts...3.7854 vs 4.54609 and in kms and miles...1 mile = 1.6093 km
    and when I do fuel mileage calculations, i do right there at the pumps every time whether in car or on bike. While I have a metric convertor calculator, I don't need it for FE calcs anymore.

    litres/100 km (4.54609/62.138818 miles) is just soooo much easier than MPG.... NOT!!!

    And we constantly go back and forth here. We still use inches for many measurements than otherwise end up in numerous decimal places, or a kazillion numerals. Look around and ask your average carpenter on the street building a home and see if his tape measure is in centimeters and millimeters. NOT!!! "Hey Joe, how long did you say that staircase drop have to be? It's 5669.28 mm Charlie...but we can live with 5669 mm if that makes it easier for ya". Ya right..... NOT!!!

    In some ways I am an UKr at heart, and in many other ways I am American....like i say, the only thing I don't like about you guys is that tiny, short-changed gallon you guys hold onto with a vengeance..
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,381
    Also, foreign cars were exempt...look at the gauges in a 1980s German car.

    US spec cars also had the ridiculous 85 mph speedometers. I have copies of the BMW Club magazine ROUNDEL; back then there were several companies offering to recalibrate and label OEM US speedometers. Fortunately the moronic law was history by the time I picked up my 1987 535is...

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,591
    Ah, maybe there was a cut-off. I have been in a number of 86-89 S-class and all had the typical 160 speedo.

    What irked me most about those old units is that 55 would be highlighted or even framed. I remember it was that way in the Ciera we had when I was a kid, and I think the same in the Tempo. Tempo was fun, speedo went to 80, I remember driving it with the needle pegged :shades:
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,329
    Oh, yeah. You couldn't miss the 55 on those speedos!

    Canada went metric because the US was already in the process and then the US dropped it. As a Canadian friend puts it it's like we were saying "This would be funny. Let's tell the Canadians we are going metric and then we won't!" Pretty close to what happened.

    There's a stretch of Interstate in southern Arizona that's all metric.

    Years ago I'd be all in favor of joining the rest of the world. The older I get the more attached I am to miles and inches and such. Of course if we went metric tomorrow my generation would still be talking and doing everything standard.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,154
    edited January 2011
    Back in the late 1970s, they used to run short cartoons on Saturday morning ala "Schoolhouse Rock" featuring characters touting the metric system.
  • imscfimscf Posts: 34
    Some years ago, NASA launched a spacecraft to Mars, to land and investigate, at a cost of $ hundreds of millions. NASA scientists, like the rest of the scientific world, use metric. Unfortunately, some of its engineers were still operating on the English miles/inches/pounds antiquated system. Results: conflicting data was fed to spacecraft, and it crashed. See the story at:
    http://articles.cnn.com/1999-09-30/tech/9909_30_mars.metric_1_mars-orbiter-clima- te-orbiter-spacecraft-team?_s=PM:TECH
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189
    I'm not so hot in math, so I use my engineer's tape measure all the time. It's got inches but usually I use the cm and mms. Whoever invented fractions should be drawn and 2.54 centimetered.

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  • Karen_CMKaren_CM Posts: 5,018
    "The costs of such technology are just one potential obstacle. A recent proposal that effectively mandates the installation of rear-view cameras to make it easier for drivers to see children hiding behind a vehicle has prompted resistance from auto makers concerned that the hardware could add hundreds of dollars to the cost of a vehicle."

    WSJ: Key to Next Push for Safer Driving: Technology

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  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,345
    Oh that's just great. If they enforce that, then now we are going to be forced to rely on something as simple as a fuse or wiring connection or speck of dirt, instead of our eyes.
    While I think certain systems can be a help, I think though that if it becomes nationwide accepted, there will be too much reliance of the proximity system rather than our own senses that are not as prone to wiring and software glitches etc. (at least in most of us :sick: :shades: ) And if a spot of dirt gets on our lens, we know about it right away.

    If only they would quit trying to idiot-proof everything :sick:
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189
    It doesn't matter if your spectacles are dirty if there's a kid crouching behind your truck and you don't walk around the rig and check before backing out of your driveway.

    Not to mention that some of us have permanent spots in our eyes. ;)

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  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,345
    Yes, that's what I meant when I said, if they become more commonplace in the world, people will tend to not do the check for the crouching kid, because they will foolishly trust the technology. They can install heat seeking sensors and any other kind to back up an actual lens even, but the weakest link will still be a fuse or wiring connection or sensor going bad at the wrong time, and a later fix or recall won't bring the kid or dog back :(

    I wasn't sure your emotorcon Steve, (it's showing as blue check mark) but if you really do have spots, you should not put off seeing a doc about them. It can be the early stages of a retinal detachment, and the earlier you catch it, the more they can do for you. A friend is going through this very thing right now. He did not act on the signs he had and now is awaiting wondering if he will ever get full use of his eye back.
    Retinal detachments can be pretty serious business. My step father had a successful operation, but later (after the operation) puked cuz they found out they administered too much anesthesia. And the retching detached the retina again and they were not able to do anything about it. He lost that eye :(
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189
    edited February 2011
    Yeah, the emotorcons are flaky again.

    I know a bit about detachments too unfortunately - my spots are silicone "fish eggs" left behind after my second repair. Only bothers me when I weed or star gaze though. ;) (that one is a "wink").

    Good point about the fuses, but I think the benefits of tools like these outweigh the occasional glitch. Too many people never look in the first place.

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  • juxtajuxta Posts: 44
    edited February 2011
    Manufacturers should be mandated to provide communication between vehicles up to several hundred feet.

    The first thing should be a receiver in cars to detect a warning signal from emergency vehicles. The warning signal would cause the radio to be turned down and perhaps cause a verbal notification. My GPS already does this for navigation directions. (Imagine, "Warning - emergency vehicle approaching" being spoken in that nice female computer voice.)

    This is fairly simple off-the-shelf technology but would help make collisions with police cruisers, fire trucks and ambulances a thing of the past.

    Our cell phones, tablets, laptops and other mobile devices communicate so easily. There's really no good reason why higher end vehicles don't have Wi-Fi and/or built in cell phones for safety purposes. Wi-Fi is becoming more popular in vehicles (i.e. Vi-Fi) so this may be just a matter of time but legislation would help move things along faster.
  • crkyolfrtcrkyolfrt Posts: 2,345
    I know why you are suggesting that, and it isn't necessarily a bad idea. However, we already have a LOT of wireless RF out there now, and there is a limited spectrum of frequencies available for use. There is already some speculation that RF interference and incompatibility could be behind issues like SUA etc.

    And of course, in my mind, I think it would contribute to less driver proactive involvement behind the wheel and settle into potentially dangerous complacency, relying on the technology to always cover their butt.

    One area it could not be faulted (setting potential RF interference on the shelf for now) would be for drivers falling asleep or driving too fast in fog...but again, both are driver error. We would have to weigh those instances saved, vs the other potential instances gained due to the complacency I mentioned above.
  • juxtajuxta Posts: 44
    Agreed, nothing is going to replace driver attentiveness just yet. Who knows if warnings like BLIS, lane depature, etc. really reduce accidents...I'm just assuming they do in making the suggestion.

    Really my idea is just a bridge to vehicles driving themselves which would require some intercommunication. I'd guess the wireless devices would use the unlicensed 2.4ghz Wi-Fi / Bluetooth bands and the cellular bands already available. This communication would be just quick signal commands between vehicles, nothing too data intensive so it shouldn't be too burdensome.

    IEEE and ITU should come up with some vehicle protocols for auto manufacturers to get things started.
  • 0patience0patience Posts: 1,542
    Mercedes already has accident avoidance technology.
    It doesn't communicate with other vehicles, it determines where the vehicle is in relation to its surroundings.
    If you get too close to the vehicle in front of you, it starts to apply the brakes.
    There is a huge push in the European market for this type of technology to be implemented.
  • I have tribeca subaru, and encounted a problem a couple of times: I was backing up slowly, and all of a sudden the car speeded and hurt a parked car. Please prompt me if anyone had a similar problem and what might have caused it. Thanks in advance.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189

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  • No matter the driver's skill level or driving conditions, a car that reacts quickly and predictably to driver inputs will be safer that one that doesn't. If a child darts out in front of you, do you think you'd have a better chance of avoiding the child in a Miata or a 15-passenger van? I realize that many people need larger vehicles, and I'm not trying to start some kind of anti-SUV campaign here, but I maintain that the best kind of accident is one you avoid. This means cars with low centers of gravity, as little weight as possible, and responsive handling.

    Another thought I had is this: Those of you who are European or have lived in Europe will know how rigorous their inspection process is for existing vehicles. Here in Texas, at least, my annual inspection consists pretty much exclusively of sticking a sniffer in the tailpipe to make sure my emissions levels are low and checking that all the lights on the car come on. The condition of my tires, suspension, glass, brakes, etc., don't seem to matter much. Taking poorly-maintained cars off the road would, I think, make us all safer.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,591
    Actual vehicle condition standards coupled with better licensing requirements would do so much to take care of so many issues on the road.

    Around here, you don't even need an inspection - bi-yearly emissions check, and that's it. Not even a light check.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,189

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  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,193
    edited March 2011
    That's the most frightening crash photos I've seen in a long time!
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,381
    edited March 2011
    Welcome to Last Week IIHS safety dweebs; you could have saved yourselves time and money by simply watching the car chase from The Seven Ups...

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

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