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Truly safe?

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    Jill Stein would be more toward the EPA job.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    "Informal investigations — where weeks or months can go by before potential problems are brought to the public's attention — are becoming more common. And that has ramifications for car buyers, who may not learn the vehicles they own or are considering buying have quietly raised safety concerns at NHTSA and among automakers."

    'Secret' informal car defect probes more common (Detroit Free Press)

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    I don't think you can pick any Federal agency that is doing their job protecting US. The FDA is inspecting less than 5% of the seafood coming into the US from sewers in China.

    My take is the Federal Government and its too many agencies are overpaid, bloated and lazy fiefdoms.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,560
    That's not just your take, that's truth for the most part. And connected supposed private industries too....ahem...insurance, etc.

    I trust the Euro nanny orgs more when it comes to safety.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    Any industry that is protected by the Federal Government become bloated, insurance, banking and now the auto industry, GM, Fiskers,Tesla etc
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,560
    Also oil, defense contractors, the prison industry, et al.

    But on topic, I don't have a huge amount of faith in the gubbamint when it comes to automotive safety concerns. I guess I should be reassured that seatbelts are mandatory equipment.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,359
    But on topic, I don't have a huge amount of faith in the gubbamint when it comes to automotive safety concerns.

    The emphasis has shifted from "safety" to "protect the most inept and clueless brain-dead idiot from the consequences of his moronic actions- no matter what the cost"

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    edited February 2013
    If you read my link, you may have noticed our old friend Sean Kane of SRS being quoted - the outfit that supports trial lawyers that got so much press over Toyota's SUA issues. Over the decades the suits and threats of suits have likely done more for implementing consumer protection stuff like seat belts and air bags than Consumers Union/Consumers Reports or the feds.

    SRS is back pushing for tire aging standards most recently (and giving Ray LaHood a "rousing" send-off).

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    Lawsuits over bogus EPA mileage figures have done more than anything to keep the auto makers honest. Now how do we keep the EPA honest? Thankfully that worthless Steven Chu is gone. I think he was sniffing or drinking ethanol.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,560
    Exactly. Fail safe stuff for people with a Starbucks in one hand and an iphone in the other. I am surprised there haven't been movements to ban manuals and motorcycles.

    I guess it makes sense though, seeing what is able to pass a licensing exam these days.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,560
    That reminds me, tax refund is in the bank, the Clinton-era tires on the fintail get to be replaced.

    The lawyers have probably done a lot to make safety tech mandatory, but I think the automakers were working on it beforehand. Last thing we need to do is support ambulance chasers :shades:
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Posts: 5,682
    all ya have ta do in New Mexico ta get your NM driver's license is plunk down yer $33 and smile. No tests, no muss, no fuss. You do have to pass a vision test, though, but as long as you wear your stylish eyeglasses you're fine. That New Mexico driver's license is good for 4 years, though, and I think that's pretty cool.

    2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    "Distracted driving is a big issue," Anwyl said, "but I'm not sure that banning technology is the solution."

    Anwyl said that consumers so love the feeling of being able to stay connected to their social circle that "it's almost an addiction." As a result, many consumers will end up bringing their devices into their cars — regardless of the rules.

    His proposed solution was driver education, not more laws. Anwyl cited a NHTSA statistic: 90 percent of accidents are caused by driver error. He stressed that drivers do not take that fact serious enough, preferring to think that car safety is all about the best technology, crash-test ratings and lots of airbags."

    A Shift in Safety Technology Is Coming

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    "Safety advocates and two parents who unintentionally hit their children when backing up sued the U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday, asking a court to order the agency to promptly issue a safety rule that was mandated by Congress in 2008 to set federal standards on vehicles' rear visibility.

    Such systems enable drivers to see whether people or objects are in the blind spot behind vehicles. Safety advocates say that each year more than 200 individuals are killed and 18,000 injured in so-called "backover" crashes." Children under the age of 5 account for 44 percent of the fatalities.

    The lawsuit asks the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to direct the DOT to issue a mandatory rule within 90 days."

    Feds, Safety Advocates Fight Over Rearview Camera Recommendation

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,359
    It's ALWAYS someone else's fault!

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    Haven't heard my "there was a wasp in the car" excuse eh?

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,529
    Only in America :(

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    Dallas County sheriff's deputies traveled to Fort Hood earlier this month and picked up their very own International MaxxPro MRAP. This particular truck has never seen any actual combat, having only been deployed stateside for training exercises, so it doesn't have any cool battle scars, but with the dealer's $600,000 price tag knocked down to nothing, and with just 10,000 miles on it, the deal was too good to pass up.

    After making the 160-mile drive back to Dallas from Fort Hood, deputy James Blesoe declared that the vehicle "exceeded expectations,


    http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/unfairpark/2013/09/dallas_county_now_has_its_ver- y.php
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    Perfect for driving over bridges to nowhere.

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  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,892
    They will be fine until they need it repaired. Seems like overkill to serve arrest warrants.
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    They'll probably take it around to the elementary schools as a recruiting tool.

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144

    Cozying up with the regulators?

    "Master lobbyist Jack Abramoff, who did time for stretching the influence peddling rules to the breaking point, distilled the practice to its essentials in his 2011 post-prison memoir, "Capitol Punishment." Once he dangled a lobbying job in front of a congressional staffer, he wrote, "I would own him and, consequently, that entire office. No ruled had been broken … but suddenly, every move that staffer made, he made with his future at my firm in mind."

    The revolving doors may be well-distributed around Washington, but NHTSA has long been viewed as a particular problem child. In 2001, at the request of Sens. John D. Rockefeller IV (D-W.Va.) and Mark Pryor (D-Ark.), the Department of Transportation's inspector general compiled a list of NHTSA officials who had moved directly between the agency and the auto industry over the previous 27 years.

    The list ran to 63 names. Those jumping directly to the industry included four administrators (the top job), two chief counsels and dozens of department heads, engineers and attorneys."

    Automakers stay cozy in U.S. capital (latimes.com)

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,560

    Good point there, oldsters are healthier than ever, so maybe that will help their driving.
    We can hope so, as there will be proportionally more oldsters on the road in the near future than ever. It could be a disaster, but might also hasten the move to at least partially autonomous cars.

    @euphonium said: http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2014/02/25/321433.htm#.UwzzJWablxo.email

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,529

    I took the AARP safety course and as a consequence I've cut my freeway speed down to 80! (I'm so proud).

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144

    "A team from Washington State University Spokane, however, has developed a system that detects drowsy drivers through inexpensive electronics that monitor movement of the steering wheel.

    ...variability in both steering wheel movements and lane position were the two best indicators of fatigue."

    Steering wheel system could detect driver fatigue on the cheap (gizmag.com)

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  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,321

    Those students should install their devices on their father's farm tractor so he can plow straight and get more wheat per acre.

  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    edited April 26

    Those GPS gizmos (pardon me, precision farming systems) have been on tractors since 2000 or so. Some of the fancier systems download sat images of the fields and do the calculation for the fertilizer application and then plug the info into the tractor's guidance system. That enables the tractor to auto steer and spray the right amount where it's needed. So nap away. B)

    I bet the autonomous car developers have been plowing through all the ag studies on this.

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  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,144
    edited April 28

    "The furor over General Motors Co.’s deadly ignition switch has the potential to doom the antiquated car key, a technology drivers have been using -- and complaining about -- for 65 years.

    Push-button start, which showed up in Mercedes models in the late 1990s, is now an option in 72 percent of 2014 cars and trucks in the U.S., according to Edmunds.com. In a survey conducted by auto researcher AutoPacific, consumers ranked the technology the fifth most coveted upgrade for $100 or less "

    Deadly GM Switch Spells Demise of Antiquated Ignition Key (Bloomberg)

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,529
    edited April 29

    you mean the "antiquated ignition key that didn't cost $400 to replace".

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