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Help! What classic car is this grill from?

I found the remains of a classic car in the wash near my parents house in Marshall, Arkansas. There is very little left of it, but the front grill/headlight assembly is mostly intact, as well as the front bumper.

I attached a link to the pic, if someone could point me in the right direction that'd be awesome! If you can pinpoint the exact year/make/model you are awesome beyond words
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Comments

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    No link...
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,914
    My first guess would be a 1953 Chevy.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    Looks like Andre's got it:
    image
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,634
    Hey, let's start a "Mystery Grill" topic! :P

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,914
    speaking of "mystery grilles", is anybody familiar with the big, blue "MOTOR" Auto Repair Manuals? My Granddad had a set of them spanning 1960-1976, although missing a year or two here and there. Each one actually went back 7 years though, so his set was good enough to cover 1953-76.

    For model and year identification, they'd usually show a picture of the bumper and grille, although often they'd cut out the headlights, depending on how well-integrated they were.

    As a little kid, I used to love looking through those books, at the pics of the grilles. With just the grille pictured, but not knowing what the rest of the car looked like, it left a lot to the imagination. For instance, I knew what a '58 Chevy looked like, as that was a common enough car, and I had a model of one. But I didn't know what a '58 Pontiac or Olds looked like, although just going by the grille pic in the book, I imagined they must have been gorgeous. Of course, once I got a little older, and saw a pic of what a '58 Pontiac or Olds really looked like, man was I disappointed!

    Those books might have been what initially turned me on to the '57-58 DeSoto, as well. The bumper/grille combinations pictures were so sleek, simple, and futuristic...downright exotic looking. It really made me wonder what the rest of the car looked like. And, when I finally saw a picture of one, it was thankfully a different experience from the Olds and Pontiac! :P
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,634
    I have some of those books. They're really a great reference and I wouldn't part with them for anything.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,601
    The old KBB and NADA guides I have from the 70s have a feature like that, also going back 7 years I think.

    I think I had one of those MOTOR manuals picked up at a garage sale when I was younger, but probably got sold off when my mother cleared out the garage when I was in school. I know my paint chip collection vanished that way.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,601
    Here's an example (excuse the dark pic) from a 1976 KBB...pretty neat

    image
  • When I started shopping for an antique car, I ran across a guy at a local car show that had a 57 Olds Super 88 for sale, and, it was in my price range. My wife and I drove to his house to look at the car. It was in decent enough shape, but, needed a lot of restoration. Looking at it, I was struck by how grotesque looking it's styling appeared to me - not near as attactive as I remebered the earlier models being. I decided to pass on it, and, later found a 48 Chevrolet that appealed to me much more. The 48 is now in my garage.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,155
    My Dad bought a NADA manual back around 1980 that had those line drawings. I thought it was pretty neat and I tried to duplicate the drawings in my notebook.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,155
    When I bought my first car, the dealership had a near mint 1958 Oldsmobile Super 88 four-door hardtop on the lot - white with a red roof and interior. I'd have loved to have had this as my first car, but he wanted $2,500 for it - a princely sum for a 16 year-old kid in 1981. Heck, I'd probably still have that car if I could've acquired it. Yeah, I know '58s are grotesque, but they're so ugly they're cool!
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,914
    I think we saw a '58 Olds 4-door sedan at Carlisle one year, in a solid, medium blue metallic. I know most people would think that if you're gonna get a car like this, you might as well go all the way and get the wildest color combination available and just show off. But I thought the conservative blue color helped tone the car down, and make it fairly attractive.

    If was gonna go for a GM "so ugly it's cool" in 1958, I think I'd seek out a Buick! I think the Olds is just too ugly and not cool enough, while the Pontiac just isn't that ugly. And I think a '58 Chevy or Caddy is actually pretty attractive.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,634
    edited February 2011
    it's amazing how complex the grillwork was on those late 50s cars. Restoring them is no easy task.
    image

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  • berriberri Posts: 4,159
    When I lived in Orlando some years back, someone who worked for Delta parked a top of the line blue 58 Buick (Limited maybe?) in the airport garage. I never saw as much chrome on a car - Harley Earl's last hurrah! I'm guessing on the road that thing reflected more sunlight than an American 727.

    The manager of the Walgreen's down the way from my house had a 58 DeSoto 4 dr in a corral like color and white two tone.

    Both of these cars were like 30 years old, but looked great and were actually daily drivers. Unfortunately, the humidity quickly kept me from thinking I was in California.
  • I remember in 1959, my Dad came home one night with a new Olds 98. It was red with a white interior, and, it was drop dead gorgeous. The thing must have been 25 feet long, had a ton of room in it, and was really fast. I used to love the sound it made when Dad kicked it into passing gear, and, the big block under the hood responded. I've yet to see a restored one at a car show.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,914
    Back in 1993, I came close to buying a 1960 Olds 98 hardtop coupe. Seller wanted something like $2500 for it. It was fairly rust-free, but had been repainted, silver, and looked like a big Coors beer can. The interior was mostly gutted, and had the seats from a 1960 Bonneville in it. They did have door panels that could go in...but they were Bonneville, and not 98.

    I passed on it, but then they called me a couple weeks later, saying they really wanted it gone, and would take $1500.

    I really hadn't thought that much about the car, and don't regret passing on it, but it was kinda cool. Around that timeframe I did buy an '82 Cutlass Supreme coupe with a 231 V-6, that turned out to be a turd. Looking back, maybe I should've gotten that 98 instead!
  • As I remember after Dad bought the 59, he then swapped it for a new 62 - which was quite quick and also very nice. The 62 got replaced by a 65 98 - which Mom hated because it was slow and heavy. Then in 1970 Dad came home with a Toronado GT with the hot 455 in it. The car was beautiful, luxurious, and, quick - in a straight line. The Toro was the last Olds Dad ever owned. One evening in 1977, he left in the Toronado, and, came home with a new BMW 530i.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,634
    Back then in the 1970s, when you jumped from a domestic car to a foreign one, it felt like you were in a different universe. Now the switch is hardly noticeable....you do notice it but it's not terribly dramatic in such a way as your dad must have felt in '77.
    image

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,601
    edited February 2011
    I suspect what your dad chose was chosen by a lot of traditional non-elderly highline buyers at the time, and it reshaped the domestic automotive landscape. He tried something else, and never looked back. Indeed, a 530i back then was a different breed than anything from home.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,155
    That 1960 Olds would've bankrupted me as I'd have been obsessed about it having the proper interior and paint.
  • oldbearcatoldbearcat Posts: 170
    I got to drive Dad's BMW a lot - went on some business trips with him. It's high speed prowness was impressive. He kept the car for 17 years, and, then, his tastes changed. He sold the BMW and bought a big Chrysler sedan. He'd had both of his hips replaced, and, I guess they were easier for him to get in, and, more comfortable. When he finally quit work due to a heart attack, at 85 years old, he had a loaded Chrysler Concorde for his daily driver. Mom had me sell it for her after he died.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat
  • oldcarphotooldcarphoto Posts: 1
    edited March 2012
    Anyone know this one? Thanks!

    image
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,601
    Pretty sure it's a 41 Plymouth
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    Yep, looks like this:
    image
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