Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





2011 535i Tires and Rims

13»

Comments

  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    New TPMS valve stem + a new GFT costs considerably less than a new RFT.
  • skobeskobe Posts: 1
    I am a former Lexus owner who recently purchased a BMW 535xi M-Sport for my wife. I drive on average roads and constantly blowing tires. The people at BMW did not warn me of this when purchasing the car. They declined my offer to purchase the tire protection 2 days after the sale when I learned of these issues. If you google “BMW tires” you will see a long list of people who got burned just like I did. Everyone at BMW knows that the tires are defective and for not sharing this info with customers they are showing that they are not a reputable company. My wife is refusing to drive the car anymore so I’ll be happy to sell anyone this one but am a reputable business man and will tell you that your life will be hell with the tire issue.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,443
    edited November 2011
    I am a former Lexus owner who recently purchased a BMW 535xi M-Sport for my wife. I drive on average roads and constantly blowing tires.

    And the wheel diameter is???

    The people at BMW did not warn me of this when purchasing the car.

    As I said in an earlier posting. few salespeople wish to discuss ANY negative in making a sale. Does this surprise you? Its shouldn't.

    They declined my offer to purchase the tire protection 2 days after the sale when I learned of these issues.

    Assuming it was new when you made the purchase, I find that odd. I know folks that have bought BMW/dealer sold wheel/tire protection within 30 days of taking delivery of their new vehicle. I wouldn't blame a manufacturer for a bad dealer action.

    If you google “BMW tires” you will see a long list of people who got burned just like I did. Everyone at BMW knows that the tires are defective and for not sharing this info with customers they are showing that they are not a reputable company.

    One can "google" just about any other manufacturer and find some gripe that many posts complain about. The fact remains, in your particular case that the vast amount of complaints are on larger diameter wheels, usually 18+".


    My wife is refusing to drive the car anymore so I’ll be happy to sell anyone this one but am a reputable business man and will tell you that your life will be hell with the tire issue.


    The obvious solution is to install smaller diameter wheels with the correspondingly larger tire size, thereby giving more sidewall rubber. To let such an easily made modification keep you from driving an otherwise upscale car seems a bit odd to me.

    Why not give a local wheel/rim shop a call and discuss with them? Ask them if they don't see a wheel size-wheel damage correlation....ie, the larger the wheel, the more bent rims and damaged tires. You may be surprised...
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    The current rage in wheels (both factory original and aftermarket) is to put the largest diameter wheel wrapped with the shortest sidewall tire one can fit in the wheel well. The buying public is demanding such stupid setups, and sooner or later the buying public is going to learn the hard way that the boy racer look is going to cost the owner a lot of money over the life of the car.

    Putting my money where my mouth is, I bought a new car last weekend, a new car which came with 18" wheels and tires with less than 3.5" of sidewall height. Before the new car's engine had cooled in my garage I'd already ordered a set of 17" wheels and tires for it; I installed them yesterday.

    Funny thing about the new car, the finance manager of the dealership has the same car and as part of her pitch to get me to buy the tire insurance, she admitted that she'd broken seven wheels in the last eighteen months (not surprising up here in New England). Instead of buying the insurance I bought the above mentioned new set of wheels and tires for less than what the insurance would have run me. My next step will be to sell the OEM set; I figure I can recoup at least eighty percent of my initial outlay for the new wheels and tires. Pretty cheap insurance in my book. :)
  • james27james27 Posts: 433
    I concur...bigger wheels have little practical use on a car. They may look neat, but a car is a tool, hopefully, a reliable one, and without some cushion there, they will be damaged. Personally, I don't really care all that much what the car looks like, I buy it for practicality and function and fun to drive. Unless you are driving at illegal speeds or on a race track, putting rubber bands on your vehicle is an expensive image booster. You get what you pay for...and pay for....and pay for. If you aren't damaging them on occasion, you either don't drive much, or are not challenging them in the first place, or have been extremely lucky.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,443
    I have 2 BMW's, both equipped with 18" wheels/RFT tires. I have suffered tire punctures, but as yet no pot-hole related wheel or tire damage.

    Fortunately, neither car is a daily driver....and, I was aware of the increased possibility of wheel and tire damage. I decided to take the risk, "eyes wide open" knowing the chances were higher of tire related issues, simply because I liked the look on the vehicle. If I do have such an event, one thing I won't be doing is blaming BMW or the tire manufacturer.

    Unfortunately, due to budget constraints, roads in all 50 states are going to get much worse before they get better, and I suspect we will see more and more complaints from large wheel diameter owners.
13»
Sign In or Register to comment.