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2012 Hyundai Elantra

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Comments

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,630
    Stick or automatic?
  • rudy66rudy66 Posts: 26
    You silly little boy. 499 people out of every 500 complain about their gas mileage. I would guess that they are grown up and many, if not most, have a lot of driving experience. And you imply that our bad mileage is because we do not know how to drive conservately. I doubt that anyone would send notes to this forum if they not were trying to drive as conservately as possible and get good mileage. You got a lucky break - forget the hubris.
  • eweinereweiner Posts: 36
    Have any of you really looked at the average miles per hour the trip computer will display??

    Consider that if you dont see a number 55 MPH or above...its not likely you'll get 40 MPG as you're not really doing highway driving.

    I'm convinced that many people think they do more highway driving then the actually do. My average is between 29 and 40 MPH. I'd like to get 40 MPG but dont see how I will achieve that if I am not driving in a manner that will allow that to happen.

    To the prius buyer above. You got significantly less car for more money. Took a hit, yes you did and you likely gave away all of your fuel savings in the process. Also, lets not forget that the prius is a hybrid and supplements battery for fuel usage.

    Historically only the prius and the civic hybrid have shown savings for the consumer over a five year period. And only if you dont pay a premium for the car.

    Now I am not trying to belittle your choice to move to Prius, only put some perspective on the decision as I am not sure you will save anything in the long run.
  • bhmr59bhmr59 Posts: 1,598
    Your point about average speed is well taken. Most people think their average speed is higher than it really is.

    Every week I meet a friend for Sunday lunch. 15.1 miles each way. 1.3 miles from home to expressway (with 2 stop signs & a traffic ight) and then moderately excellerate to 60 MPH & set cruise control. Then exit ramp to connect to another highway (have to disengage the cruise for a curve) which is about 45 to 50 MPH for a mile and a half to the next connecting ramp to another highway. Once on this third highway I hit the "resume" on the cruise. This section of highway is about 6 miles. Then on to a 35 MPH road(with traffic light at the end of the exit and one additional stop sign).

    The trip is 3.3 miles local and 11.8 miles highway and take 22 to 25 minutes depending upon length of time at stop sign or traffic light. A lot of people would think they averaged 60 MPH and were using the cruise. They forget about the few miles of local roads with stops & starts, and the cut-off of cruise on the connecting ramps. But the best average speed for this trip is about 41 MPH according to the math.
  • tenpin288tenpin288 Posts: 804
    edited February 2012
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,630
    Yay! My 2004 Elantra GT hatch has been a great car for us (my son uses it as his college car now), and I had pushed the Elantra way down my shopping list for my next car (summer 2013 purchase) because it was sedan-only, vs. hatches like the Mazda3, Focus, Impreza, and Golf.

    But NOW... suddenly the Elantra vaults way up my list because of the GT. Can't wait to see/drive it. Glad to see it will be offered with an MT. I hope Hyundai has one at the Greater Twin Cities Auto Show next month. I think that's very possible because I know HMA has used the same cars in the past for Chicago and Twin Cities... in fact my 2004 GT was one of those cars!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,630
    I just looked at the 5 minute video included in the full Media Kit (available via link above). A few things I noticed:

    * The center stack looked richer than on the current sedan.
    * The back seat folds FLAT, with the seat bottoms folding up also--just like on the old Elantra GT hatch!
    * The stick shift knob is snazzier than on the sedan.

    Also I see that there's a panoramic sunroof. I am hoping that isn't standard. I noticed there's a lot of equipment on this car, including standard front seat heaters and 17" alloys. So I am hoping the base price isn't too stratospheric. If they could keep it under $20k with cloth, MT, no options, that would be pretty good. But it would bump up against some other fine hatches, including the Mazda3i Touring, Impreza Premium, Focus SE, and Golf.

    FWIW, my 2004 GT listed at $17.4k with every option available at that time, including moonroof, ABS/traction, 15" alloys (standard), and leather (leather was standard back then). The new GT has much more equipment, however. My price was $13.2k + TTL. Don't think the new one will be anywhere close to that!
  • Has anyone noticed how the passenger door panel doesn't line up to the dash board?

    Contact your dealer!
  • sarin2sarin2 Posts: 1
    We bought a 2012 Elantra GLS my husband hit a racoon and the front radiator support, dust cover and the lower front grill was damaged. My question is if I take it to my neighborhood( the guy is good and not so expensive) shop to fix it instead of the dealer will this void the car warranty in the future?
  • Gee, this is a production built vehicle, not hand built, maybe you should buy something that will cost more, still find fault with. To me, it kinda of a nit picking which a lot of people have when they have buyers remorse, all I can say is go buy a Cruze, I see where there starting to burn down to the ground for some reason, you might be happier.I bet your dealer just loves to see you come in. NOT
  • tomtom59tomtom59 Posts: 3
    I agree with you sivicman. GDI is the way to go. I have a feeling Hyundai yanked the GDI engine for the Elantra because it would outperform another model of it's cars, the Sontata perhaps? When I plunk down multi-thousands for a car I too want the latest technology, not some "stay is high gear" tweeked computer program. As for MPG I have three vehicles. A 93 3.0 V6 12 valve Ford Ranger that gets 30 on the highway (on Regular), a 2002 Jaguar X-Type 2.5 24 valve V6 that gets 30.2 highway (on Regular, and is AWD) as well as a 2003 Miata with a 1.8 (rated at 29 hwy) gets 40 highway (10.1 gallons, 420 miles on mid-grade). Only change is Mobil 1 synthetic oil in each (synthetic fluid in tranny on the Jag too). My MPG is achieved using cruise & doing 70mph. None are new & I can't complain about fuel economy.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    The adoption of DI has been a little uneven, but it usually accounts for 10 more HP. I fail to see why they didn't put DI on the 1.8L version of that engine, since the 2.0L version has it (in fact, it's sitting in the Kia Soul, it's already federalized).
  • porperporper Posts: 2
    We test drove 3 comparable cars back-to-back over a weekend. Additionally, we rented the Elantra over the entire weekend. In addition to the Elantra, we tested the Nissan Sentra S and the Chevy Cruise LT.

    The Elantra we drove had 40k miles on it. But, rather than disqualifying it from our evaluations, it actually gave us a valuable glimpse into how well the car might hold up [keeping in mind that rental companies generally maintain their cars better than most drivers do] and how it might perform several years down the road, and not just fresh off of the sales floor lot. The mileage would have no effect on the overall build quality, other than to, again, highlight how well that build quality might hold up.

    "Best Car Ever"? Sure, if what you're used to are bottom-of-the-barrel econo-box specials. The immediate impression the Elantra made on us was that of a thin-walled soda-pop can on wheels. The general feel of the car was cheapness. The interior had acres of cheap plastic, along with the shiny, hard plastic dash that so many manufacturers are currently churning out. Things went downhill from there. There was an annoying and persistent rattle coming from under the car. Power? Forget it. Not much there for passing, of much of anything. And, with the air conditioner turned on, there was even less power. The engine groaned horribly any time you stepped on the gas. Mileage wasn't anything extraordinary, although it didn't seem too bad, either.

    Steering at highway speeds was scary. The electronic power steering that many [particularly Asian] manufacturers have adopted has a long way to go. Steering and controlling the car on expressways was unnerving and imprecise, and the vehicle felt unstable. When going over bumps, the Elantra seemed to jump sideways, momentarily loosing stability. The car vibrated when idling. Parallel parking was difficult due to the limited visibility out of the rear windshield. On the plus side, the air conditioning energized very quickly, although at highway speeds in the 100 plus degree heat, it was barely able to cool very much.

    If the Elantra seemed cheap, the Sentra S was like Al Yankovic: even worse. Driving it, we had the feeling of going down several notches in quality. It felt even less solid than the Elantra. Even poorer acceleration, poorer stability over roads, poorer braking. Looking under the hood, we found a tiny, tiny, seeming inch-thick radiator resembling a child's toy. The entire assembly seemed to have been randomly thrown together in the manner of American engineering of past decades, rather than the logical and orderly Japanese method we've seen. Even worse, there was a ledge at the bottom of the engine
    over which the air conditioning compressor constantly dripped condensation. Now, there's a built-in rust-through situation. We exited the Sentra S quickly after testing it.

    The Chevy Cruze 1LT brought a welcome change from the other 2 Asian cheapos. Climbing into the car, you at last experience a feeling of solidness, strength, and quality. Not a whole lot of it, but certainly way more than we found in the other two cars. The Cruze still has the same hard, shiny plastic dash that the other cars have, with lots of plastic parts. Additionally, we looked for the "near luxury car" feel that others have attributed to it - and we didn't find it. At all. My aged 1990's era vehicle [not a luxury car] has incomparably more of those attributes than the Cruse. But, the impression of solid quality was unmistakable.

    With the turbo engine, the Cruze had more power than the other two cars, but not that much, and the engine groaned and struggled under hard acceleration of the kind you might employ to merge onto expressways. With air conditioning running, it had even less power and more strain. The air conditioning itself was poorer than either the Sentra or Elantra. Road stability was much, much better than the other two cars we had driven, as was the steering. Looking under the hood, things were laid out better than in the other cars, and somewhat more accessible.

    If we had to choose between these three cars, the hands down winner would be the Cruze. But only by default, actually. Looked at on its own, the Cruze offered inadequate acceleration and unimpressive interior appointments and quality. Those thinking that a car such as this was "near luxury class" needs an immediately reality check.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    You realize that, despite the turbo, the Cruze has less horsepower than the Elantra? What you were feeling was the low end torque, where the Elantra is very insufficient. But that's why the Cruze was groaning and struggling: the thing's only got 138 HP under the hood.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,630
    edited July 2012
    The interior had acres of cheap plastic, along with the shiny, hard plastic dash that so many manufacturers are currently churning out.

    Did you actually touch the Elantra's dash? The top of it is padded. There's a lot of hard plastic parts in the Elantra's interior though... just like in any new inexpensive car these days. Your rental must have been a base GLS; the GLS with Preferred Package has padded inserts in the doors that help schazz things up a bit.

    Mileage wasn't anything extraordinary, although it didn't seem too bad, either.

    You had the Elantra for a weekend, and you didn't measure fuel economy? If so, what was it?

    Driving it (Sentra), we had the feeling of going down several notches in quality.

    I don't know what you drive today, but I've leased a 2010 Sentra S for 27 months now and I've found it's a solid, comfortable car--if not too exciting. Also, it's the only car I've owned/leased this long that has had absolutely zero problems--zilch, nada.

    The Cruze still has the same hard, shiny plastic dash that the other cars have,...

    So you didn't touch the dash of the Cruze either, it appears.

    Road stability was much, much better than the other two cars we had driven, as was the steering.

    That's interesting... one of the things I don't like about the Cruze after driving it many times as a rental is that the steering seems vague on the highway. That, and the tight rear seat. Otherwise I think it's a pretty nice little car, tons better than the old Cobalt. Makes a nice rental, if I'm not carrying any passengers in back.
  • sandman_6472sandman_6472 Coral Springs, FLPosts: 2,579
    "The Chevy Cruze 1LT brought a welcome change from the other 2 Asian cheapos. Climbing into the car, you at last experience a feeling of solidness, strength, and quality. Not a whole lot of it, but certainly way more than we found in the other two cars."

    Let me get this straight, y'all climbed in and sat down and felt strength, quality and solidness. Solidness of what...the seats? The thunk of the doors closing? You didn't drive the car yet so how was this solidness measured? For the quality, was it the quality of the seat fabric or the switchgear? Since the car wasn't driven yet, the ride quality could not be judged...quality has different meanings to people. And for strength, how does one quantify this? Not trying to be mean or nothing, but I just don't understand your logic here. I agree with much of what you've written, just not which cars had more or less of these attributes. Personally, I felt the Elantra was a notch above the Cruze and Sentra but felt the seating was most comfortable in the Sentra even though it's the oldest model.
    Think the Verano is the sleeper in this group though the mileage and price are its two negatives. From all I've read, it seems to be the lux econo ride here though. We're in the market for either a subcompact or compact since our current ride is getting too costly to keep on the road. The a/c is about to quit and with over 108k on the clock, just want it gone.

    The Sandman :) :sick: :shades:

    2014 Hyundai Tuscon SE/2005 Mazda 3s/2008 Hyundai Accent GLS/2009 Nissan Versa SL hatch

  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    The solidness was probably measured by the heavy lead weights in the chassis. The thing is pretty heavy. :shades:

    Actually, weight sometimes does lend to that solidity feel. However, it also add to...well, weight. Which takes power to drag around.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,630
    Think the Verano is the sleeper in this group though the mileage and price are its two negatives. From all I've read, it seems to be the lux econo ride here though.

    I consider the Verano to be in a different class than econoboxes like the Cruze, Elantra, and Sentra. If you max out one of those, you get to the bottom of the price range for the Verano. I see the Verano competing more with cars like the ILX.
  • sunstate2013sunstate2013 Posts: 6
    edited July 2012
    I was going to craft a really humorous response to porper's Elantra vs Sentra vs Cruze review but after seeing that he registered to this forum on July 12, 2012 and posted his/her one and only post immediately after registering I decided it wasn't worth my time.

    Reading his likely fabricated review wasn't worth my time either.

    There is always at least one in every crowd and/or forum.

    A 2012 rental Elantra with 40K miles. Really!
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