Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Natural Gas - The Next Big Fuel?

2»

Comments

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,511
    This is called NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials). Sounds like the regulators are on top of it, as they should be. Another good example of where we need to watch, measure, and regulate, but not over-react. This is nothing like the radioactive leak issues associated with the Japanese power plants, for example.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,744
    If we have that big of an abundance, we need to get it to folks in the NE that are still heating with fuel oil (diesel). All of which is without any pollution control as far as I can tell.

    Actually, natural gas heat is pretty common in the northeast in areas where there is a dense population. Rural areas don't have it because of the cost of running a line to every house. I have gas heat.

    As for oil not being clean, the oil heat trade group claims that oil heat is so clean it doesn't require any federal regualtions. I take that with a grain of salt.

    http://www.oilheatamerica.com/index.mv?screen=burners
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,013
    edited July 2011
    Well, yeah, and there's arsenic in rocks too. It's not a problem until the miners dig up the gold or silver or whatever and break down the ore. Then the arsenic is released from the tailing and sterilizes the streams.

    Funny acronym since it's anything but "NORMal". :shades:

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,511
    One of the biggest barriers to NGV adoption on a wide scale could be, surprise, the "Pickens Plan" and wind electricity generation. He promoted wind power at the same time he promoted NGVs. Guess what? Every megawatt of wind power has to have 100% duplication with backup generators, and these generators have to be able to switch on instantly, the wind can die in a matter of minutes. The only backups that can do that are natural gas-fired turbines. So as windpower increases, the demand for natural gas power generation increases, preventing large volumes from being available for NGVs.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,850
    And that is what makes the TRUE cost of Wind generation so expensive. If they spent the money on clean coal that has been wasted on Solar and Wind we would not worry about other forms of power generation. There is a reason the Chinese are building 2-3 new coal generation plants per week. It is the best power source for the least overall cost. Clean it up even more and nothing with match it. Though NG is very handy and quick to get on line. So I agree about T-Boone's plan. Last I read he backed out on the wind plan.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,733
    Except that coal is never "clean".

    In fact, more radiation is released from coal burning than ever is released from nuclear power (short of a total melt-down, of course). More, in fact, from the ash that's left over.

    And we don't technically have an infinite supply of coal, either. But I suspect that the Moon will keep orbiting for at least the next few thousand years (who knows, we might blow it up by then).
  • I'm sorry I actually don't know what the word "new" is doing next to "wells"
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,013
    Texases said " There are just about 0 proven cases of these new wells fracturing into fresh water aquifers."

    I found a link pointing to new wells causing contamination of existing water wells due to the fracking process.

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

2»
Sign In or Register to comment.