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Hyundai Elantra Real World MPG 2012

Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,876
2012 owners... let us know how you're doing!

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  • The 2012 Elantras will likely not have enought miles on them to provide a meaningful MPG result. We have already had this discussion on 2011 models. It seems that we will be repeating the problem and discussion here. Since 2011 and 2012 models are the same design, there should be a 2010 and earlier grouping and a 201 and later grouping.
  • Posting this message out of much and disappointment and frustration....

    In July, I traded my 2009 Mitsbushi Eclipse for a 2012 Hyundai Elantra. The decision to trade-in my eclipse was for the soul fact that the car was not getting the ideal gas milage (~24 mpg out of EPA range of 20-28 mpg) for my long (all highway) commute to work and back. After much research, I decided to purchase the Elantra due to its (claimed) great gas milage, features, and price versus that of the competitors. BIG MISTAKE!

    After owning the vehicle for a little over a month and putting 2000 miles on it, I notice the vehicle was averaging about 26 mpg on each tank. After contacting the dealership about my concerns, I was told to wait till my first oil change to reflect the change in gas milage. The first oil change came and I did notice an improvement in my gas milage between 2-3 miles, put definitely nothing in the CLAIMED 29-39 range. I decided to contact Hyundai about my concerns regarding in which I was told to wait till the car was broken in at about 5000-6000 miles.

    After 6000 miles I was still averaging about 27 mpg (all on ECO mode). I, again, contacted Hyundai customer service about my concern. Their response was to do have a fuel MPG test and to have the vehicle inspected by a local dealership. The fuel MPG test, released by Hyundai, requires you to have record the miles traveled and amount of fuel used five times while going to the same gas station and using the same pump. Again, I was still consistently getting between 25-27 mpg. I had the dealership, also, inspect the vehicle for any issues and run a diagnostic test for any issues--- none were found. All this information was then faxed over to Hyundai customer service.

    So... I just got off the phone with Hyundai customer serivce and they are saying that the car is in working order and there is nothing they can do to assist me.

    So why am I getting such poor gas milage that isnt even in the working range of the EPA estimates? I have tried every recommended way to enhance mpg and nothing seems to improve it. I was getting decent gas milage (in the EPA range) for my Eclipse so I really dont think it is in my driving style.

    I see that forum that others are having the same problem. I dont see how so many people are driving this vehicle 'wrong' .

    I am so disappointed in my purchase and wish I would have gone with a competitor that lives up to its ratings. Hyundai is doing nothing but false advertising this vehicle. I hope to see a class action lawsuit in the future.

    If you are thinking about buying a 2012 Elantra and want great gas milage... DONT!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,716
    Just wondering, would those 201's be rated at something like... 2 horsepower (if there's 2 horses pulling the chariot/wagon)? And would it be Miles per Bushel (of oats) vs. Miles per Gallon?

    ;)

    I agree on your point, but Kirstie explained her reasoning... and she's the Host.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,876
    Yes, good point... BUT, at some point it will be more relevant, and it will be interesting to see if 2012 MPGs improve after a realistic break-in period. Sometimes break-in *is* the only issue.

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  • g2iowag2iowa Posts: 123
    Any information offered here is only as good as the detail provided. So posters need to provide all the pertinent information. Which specific vehicle they have (e.g., base manual transmission versus loaded Limited with automatic transmission). How many miles they have driven? What type maintenance they have done? Things like the type of fuel they are using, esp. if using any ethanol (which will decrease fuel economy). Are they buying branded fuel or the cheapest gas they can find? And lots of info on the type of driving done. How much is highway vs city? What type city driving (a lot of stop and go, lots of idling, etc.)? How much of time using AC? Are they using the Eco feature? Are they religious about ensuring proper tire pressure? Are they routinely driving with heavy loads (e.g., mostly just driver vs driver & 2 or 3 passengers)? Etc.
  • You're correct. The devil is in the details.

    My car is a 2012 Elantra Limited - 17" wheels with automatic transmission

    Current Odometer Reading: 3400

    Last calculated mpg: 29.7

    # of people in the car other than the driver: 0

    tow package: no

    any other additional weight in the car: no

    driving trips: commuter - 70% highway / 30% local

    # of stop signs for round trip: 2

    # of stop lights for round trip: 4

    # of inclines for round trip: 4, which means that there are 4 downgrades for round trip.

    air pressure in tires: 32 psi all around

    Fuel: Mobil or Shell, 87 Octane w/ 10% ethanol

    A/C use: not since the summer, and used only on return trip home from work

    ECO: Always On

    Maintenance done so far: None, dealer recommendation of 5000 miles for 1st oil change

    Did I miss anything????
  • rudy66rudy66 Posts: 26
    Major,
    I get better mileage with the eco off and the car is much more fun to drive.
    Rudy
  • g2iowag2iowa Posts: 123
    For your highway miles, how fast are you driving? Are you using cruise control?
  • I bought my 2012 GLS on June 28 and have almost 9000 miles. I am driving every day to work 40 miles one way (36 highway and 4 citi). I am using the same gas station and the same pump and getting between 32 and 33 miles. I was expecting around 35-36 but even with these numbers I completly satisfied. Nice car and fun to drive. My friend is getting the same mpg on 2011 Honda Civic.
  • Take a look a fueleconomy.gov. Real world miles as shared by drivers for 18 of the 2005 model and 18 of the 2012 models.

    2005 Hyundai Elantra, automatic: Rated 24MPG City, 29MPG HWY
    average combined as reported by 18 drivers: 28.3MPG

    2012 Hyundai Elantra, automatic: Rated 30MPG City, 40MPG HWY
    average combined as reported by 18 drivers: 28.8MPG

    That extra 11 miles per gallon highway seems to be missing from everywhere but the sales pitch.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,716
    How long have the 2005 Elantra owners been driving their cars? How many tanks are their data based on?

    Same question for the 2012 Elantra owners.
  • rudy66,

    Thank you... I've tried turning ECO off a couple of times during the past week, and I did notice a difference in engine response, but I have yet to turn ECO off for a whole tank. I think that I will try it on my next fill up.

    If it is true that one does get better mileage with ECO off, could it mean that something is wrong with ECO or should ECO be used only in certain trips, i.e. ECO off for highway driving, and ECO on for local driving? Just curious...
  • g2iowa,

    For about 11-13 miles on my highway commute (one way), the speed limit is 65, so I've been doing between 65-70. For the remaining 4-6 miles (one way), the speed limit is 55, so I've been doing between 60-65. Any slower would be dangerous because with the way people drive here in NY, you run the risk of being driven off the road, if you know what I mean.

    For the whole highway part of my commute, I do not use cruise control. There are just too many hills (one of which is too steep). I do not believe cruise control would help in improving my gas mileage because cruise control does not and cannot adjust for hills until you are already on those hills. And in those cases when cruise control does kick in going uphill, the engine rpms are increased dramatically, thus reducing gas mileage.

    Just so you know, I have tried cruise control in my Elantra during the late summer months this year, and the same thing happens, and I did not see an improvement in mpg.
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    hi folks,i just returned from a over 400 mile roundtrip from where i live in hallandale beach,fla to orlando and back and thought i would give a mpg update for my 2012 elantra gls base model.the car has currently 2000 miles on it..with about 90% highway driveing on this trip and with the a/c going full blast and according to the trip computer on the car i averaged 46 mpg. better than the highway mpg estimate on the sticker which is 40...by the way,this car just floats down the highway and is one of the best rideing and handleing cars i have ever driven.i realize that some people are not getting the advertized mpg but i think it probably just depends from car to car and how you drive it as well.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,716
    What was your speed on that trip? Also did you use cruise and/or Eco on the trip? Is this automatic or stick? Thanks.
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    edited November 2011
    i was doing about 65 mph on the highway with the cruise control and eco mode switched on.my highway mpg are very good on this car however,the best city mpg i have achieved thus far is about 26 mpg which isn't that far off from the advertised 29 mpg.Also keep in mind that my city driveing is 90% within 5 miles from where i live and it's mostly stop and go all the time.by the way,it's a auto tranny.
  • rudy66rudy66 Posts: 26
    Thanks for the info but I am tired of suggestions that those of us who get bad mileage don't know how to drive. I get over 40 on pure highway driving as well. Now you should drive in traffic similar to New York or any big city and see how you do.
    Dolf
  • g2iowag2iowa Posts: 123
    Are you just going by the trip computer to come up with the mpg number? What was the mpg number using the actual number of gallons of gas pumped into your Elantra and the total miles driven on that gas?
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    i started with 10 gallons of gas so i could do a more accurate mpg reading.i filled up near to where i live then headed up to orlando.i reset my odometer then started the drive.car was bone empty when i filled it up with 10 gallons of gas.this is a very easy calculation so you do the math..440 miles total driven before car needed to be filled up again.440 miles divided by 10 gallons of gas=44 miles per gallon.these calculations are based on about 90% highway driveing.by the way,the trip computer in the car was very accurate.
  • Steve you reported 46mpg in your previous post about this trip. Now it's 44mpg.

    Which was it? :confuse:
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    it's 44,my mistake..i'll be takeing another road trip up there around christmas time so i'll report my mpg once again from that trip....
  • dodgeman07dodgeman07 Posts: 573
    edited November 2011
    Thanks Steve. :)

    I don't own an Elantra nor am I affliated with Hyundai in any way. No horse in this race. :D Here is what I verify if having mileage problems:

    1. Quality of fuel (85 vs. 87 vs. 89 octane | 10% ethanol or no ethanol)
    2. Vehicle load (your total vehicle weight vs. dry curb weight)
    3. Tire pressure (cold tire pressure at 33-35 psi)
    4. Driving speed and acceleration (at speed limit and engine revs)
    5. Driving conditions (wind, hills/mountains, heavy traffic. etc.)

    87 octane, no ethanol fuel runs best for me. I buy name-brand fuel when I can. I keep my vehicle weight to a minimum - nothing unneeded in the trunk or passenger cabin. I set my cold tire pressure at, or a touch above, the manufacturer's recommended psi. If I drive over the speed limit or rev the engine a lot, I expect a mileage penalty. Hilly terrrain and heavy traffic reduce my mileage up to 30%.

    Best of luck!
  • I agree on what your saying. The only thing that I do different is instead of "air" in my tires, I use nitrogen. The hot and cold temps. that everyone has doesn't effect the tire prssure like air does. Air increases with heat, but loses in the cold, or shall we say the air molecules expand an contract acording to temp. an driving conditions. It use to drive me nuts in the winter with air and you car has the TPMS. If it goes below 25.7 PSI, the TPMS light comes on, especially if you don't drive it everyday or 2. Just my 2 cents.
  • I am confused about your method of calculating mpg. My reading of this is the gas you used to drive 440 miles was 10 gallons to refill at the end of your trip plus the amount of gas used to fill your tank from 10 gallons to full at the beginning of your trip. Please be more specific about your methods if my analysis of your method is incorrrect. I cannnot see how you measured starting with 10 gallons in your tank and how you ran your car to bone dry (not possible).
  • g2iowag2iowa Posts: 123
    You lost me on your methodology. I'd have no idea how I'd ever know my tank had exactly 10 gals of fuel in it unless I ran out of gas and then added 10 gals. But running out of gas is a very bad thing to do anymore to modern cars. [Not sure I've seen anything in the manual on the "reserve". Many models have the low fuel light kick in at 1.5 or 2 gals left in tank. So if you added 10 gals when low fuel light kicked in you may actually have as much as 12 gals in tank.] Thinking the way most people do the actual fuel used method is to fill the tank up until the gas pump auto-shut off kicks in. Then stop. Reset trip odo to 0. Drive your distance. Refuel tank from same pump and fuel till auto-shut off kicks in. Then divide miles driven by gals added. This gives the best way to approximate actual fuel economy achieved for that one tank.
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    i find myself haveing to repeat this over and over to make you understand annoying.so hear i go again...read my lips people.........I FILLED UP MY GAS TANK BEFORE STARTING OUT ON MY TRIP WHICH WAS EMPTY WITH THE FUEL LIGHT ON...I PUT IN THE TANK ACCORDING TO THE GAS PUMP AT THE STATION WITH EXACTLY 10 GALLONS OF FUEL.I THEN RESET MY ODOMETER TO 0 AND BEGAN MY JOURNEY.WHEN I GOT BACK HOME ON THE SAME TANK I LEFT WITH THE TRIP ODOMETER SAID 440 MILES AND THE GAS TANK WAS EMPTY.440 MILES DIVIDED BY 10 GALLONS OF GAS=44 MILES PER GALLON..WHAT PART OF THIS EQUATION ARE YOU CONFUSED WITH??..WITH ALL DO-RESPECT IT IS SIMPLE MATH...THANKS.....
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,235
    Unfortunately you're not using an accurate method of measurement as you can't say with precision how much gas was in the tank before you added the initial 10 gallons.

    The generally accepted way to measure fuel economy is to fill up the tank until it's full. Don't overfill/top off. Write down your odometer reading. Then go on your trip. When you need to refuel or when you're done with the trip, fill up again. Now, take the miles driven (current odometer reading - the reading you wrote down) and divide it by the number of gallons it took to fill up at the end of the trip. That provides an easy & accurate fuel economy numbers that a consumer can get.
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    i'll keep that in mind when i do my next road trip,thanks for the info....
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,716
    edited November 2011
    A couple of things for the OP to try on the next trip (at Christmas):

    * Reset the average mpg meter at the pump before the trip and at the pump at the end of the trip, so you can compare the computer's mpg to actual (measured) mpg. Would be interesting to know how they compare.
    * Measure mpg as explained in these recent posts, i.e. fill to first click-off both times, and if feasible use the same pump at the same station both times. If that isn't possible, the single-tank average might be inaccurate due to differences in pumps.

    (Posted before I saw #30)
  • i find myself haveing to repeat this over and over to make you understand annoying.so hear i go again...read my lips people.........I FILLED UP MY GAS TANK BEFORE STARTING OUT ON MY TRIP WHICH WAS EMPTY WITH THE FUEL LIGHT ON...I PUT IN THE TANK ACCORDING TO THE GAS PUMP AT THE STATION WITH EXACTLY 10 GALLONS OF FUEL.I THEN RESET MY ODOMETER TO 0 AND BEGAN MY JOURNEY.WHEN I GOT BACK HOME ON THE SAME TANK I LEFT WITH THE TRIP ODOMETER SAID 440 MILES AND THE GAS TANK WAS EMPTY.440 MILES DIVIDED BY 10 GALLONS OF GAS=44 MILES PER GALLON..WHAT PART OF THIS EQUATION ARE YOU CONFUSED WITH??..WITH ALL DO-RESPECT IT IS SIMPLE MATH...THANKS.....

    You have to repeat because your first explaination was very confusing. You are correct it is annoying. Your second explaination was clearer except the ALL CAPS which makes for difficult reading. I was not confuesd about the equations only your explaination. I am not certain about the amount of respect but it is simple math. I have very little confidence your method provides accurate measurement of MPG. It is certainly one I would not have used.
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