Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





1946-1954 American Cars

2

Comments

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    edited June 2012
    The clock on that Chevy is down to about 11 hours now and it's up to 11,100. The seller has added a "Buy it Now" figure of 15,500.

    My hand keeps reaching for the mouse to place a bid but I keep getting a nagging feeling that "something" isn't right about that car.

    For one thing, it appears to have carpeting instead of rubber mats in the front seat and I'm 99% certain they didn't come that way.

    And that engine should be painted grey and not black. Why would someone feel the need to paint an engine in a 16,000 mile car?

    And it's been repainted.

    I wish I lived closer so I could go see it. With my luck, the rods are knocking or something is amiss. Pictures can hide a lot!

    Oh well...
  • oldbearcatoldbearcat Posts: 161
    Isell:

    I think you're right about the carpet - if it's like my 48, you have to take out the mat to get to the master cylinder fill plug. It's under the floor. I can understand the rest of your concerns as well. The only way to be sure about this car would be to have someone local inspect it for you. I found my car on Craigslist, and, it was only 15 miles away. I inspected it, explained to the owner the issues I found, and made him an offer I was comfortable with. So far there have been no major surprises with the car. Given the price its up to now, I'd be reluctant to bid on it as well. I saw a car like this one for sale at a cruise-in last weekend. The car looked good from 10 feet away,and it had new chrome. When I took a closer look, I could see that the wiring was all shot, the heater was kaput, the engine was an oily mess, and some body rust had been painted over. The owner wanted $9500 for it. The car was showing 90K on the speedo.

    Regards:
    Oldengineer
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    The Chevy got up to 12,100 and didn't make the reserve. He did add a "Buy it Now" price of 15,500.

    On the phone, he was pretty vague about a few things. I'm pretty sure he bought it just to flip it. He admitted that it leaked " a bit" of oil.

    At that age, all of the rubber parts and seals would be shot I would think.

    Those old Chevies had a closed driveshaft and sometimes the internal seals would go bad, especially on the Powerglides. If you parked them on a steep hill, the transmission fluid would get past those seals and run into the differential overfilling it and making a hell of a mess.

    They made a "kit" where you pounded a sleeve into the front of that driveshaft. I won't say what they called them as to not insult anyone here who might be from Oklahoma.

    It was really a mickey mouse quickie way to fix it but they would work for awhile.

    I never met an old Chevy that didn't leak at least some oil

    The thought of jumping into a 60 year old car and driving it 1000 miles home scared me a bit too and shipping was 750.00. To register it, I would have to pay Washington sales tax of 9.5%.

    Add all of those things up and the uncertainty of buying a car sight unseen gave me cold feet. Just not that much of a risk taker I suppose.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    That Chevy hit 13,000 and that was short of it's reserve.

    Today I managed to find the latest Old Cars Price Guide and thye have it peggged in Number 2 condition at 12,200. Giving it a Number 2 rating could have been a stretch too.

    So, the seller really got all of the money at least in my book he did.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,424
    I've been impressed how well many ebay autions reflect the actual market value, rather than sellers' inflated ideas. Inside line recently sold their '85 Porsche 911. They tried ebay, top bid was $17,100, less than their reserve. They then went through many efforts to get a better price, and ended up selling overseas. The final sales price? $17,500, that $400 was hardly worth the effort and time they expended.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,648
    eBay is a good way to appraise a car presuming you have enough points of sale. The bidders are voting with their wallets, not their opinions.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,914
    I don't like it when "low mileage original" cars have new paint and sometimes new interior. If I am looking for low miles, I want nice original cosmetics. If I can't get those, might as well just get a restored car, which will probably be easier to live with in the long run anyway.
  • oldbearcatoldbearcat Posts: 161
    Isell:

    I agree with you. Vague answers don't encourage you to crack out the old wallet. I saw what the bidding was up to as well. My 48 supposedly had a rebuilt engine and tranny when I bought it. Her rear main seal drips oil and her tranny leaks gear lube as well. After rummaging through the Chevy forums for advice, I decided my best course of action was just to refill things as needed and stick a kitty litter pan under her when she's in my garage. Keep looking - you'll find what you're looking for. Took me two years of looking before I found the 48 and pulled the trigger on it. Last Summer I ran across a beautiful restored early 50's 2 door Chevy with dual carbs and fenton headers on it at a cruise-in. The guy wanted $12K for it then. If I run across it again, and its still for sale, I'll give you a heads up - if you're interested. The one I mentioned in my earlier post at $9500 IMO was very overpriced and needed a lot of restoration.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    I totally agree with you. A couple of things scared me about that Chevy.

    The fact it had been repainted..." a long time ago".. OK, paint wasn't as good 60 years ago so I guess I can accept that.

    The entire engine had been painted black...WHY, on a 16,000 mile car??

    Maybe I was just looking for reasons not to buy it cheapskate that I am.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    I don't doubt that engine and transmission have been rebuilt. Back in those days, 50,000 miles was a lot of miles.

    Those also had the old babbetted bearings and splash lubrication. Those bearings need to be adjusted and shimmed once in awhil before the rods start knocking. Hopefully there is someone in your area that knows how to do this.

    And, as I said before, it is nearly impossible to find an old Chevy that doesn't leak oil and that "dog turd" rear main "rope" is usually the source. Until it gets real bad, I would live with it.

    DO NOT let that engine get low on oil and try not to wind it out too hard in the lower gears. These weren't bad engines but they don't like high RPM's.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,914
    Nah, that's a lot of money, You could have found a nicely restored driver for the same, without the same inflated claims and issues.

    I know a lot of low mileage cars were stored poorly and suffered with bad paint and rotted interiors, but I would rather that be left for me to deal with. The market is different now than even 10 years ago though, now "patina" is very desirable and people like old and original - where before they wanted to erase it at all costs.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,424
    "DO NOT let that engine get low on oil and try not to wind it out too hard in the lower gears. These weren't bad engines but they don't like high RPM's. "

    While one wouldn't want to swap a new(er) 250 cid Chevy 6 into a 'low mile original' '52, is that an option for a less 'special' one? Would seem to really improve the drivability factor.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    Then the car is no longer original.

    Those old 216's and early 235's weren't that bad PROVIDING you treated it well. They can easily cruise all day at 65-70 MPH. they can get up to 95 too (trust me) but they don't like that.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    15 minutes from where we live.

    He tried selling it on CL last summer. I remember I actaully called him and he didn't return my message for two weeks.

    If it drove by 50 feet away, I would probably think..." That's a nice '48 Plymouth"

    The harder you look, the worse it gets!

    http://seattle.craigslist.org/est/cto/3076855159.html
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,914
    Photographs well but isn't exactly concours up close...my fintail can relate :shades:

    Looks like the seller is trying to show off that Viper too...not impressed.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    It looks like a total rust bucket to me and not worth the cost of restoration.

    Even if someone wanted to make it a daily driver, they would HAVE to do an interior and replace the glass. Even then, who knows how it runs.
  • oldbearcatoldbearcat Posts: 161
    Isell:

    I know about the bottom end that this engine has. So far I'm doing my own wrenching on her. I just redid the valve gear myself, and, now she's much happier at speed. Yeah - I decided just to put up with the rear main leak at this point. Putting a seal in with the engine in the car looks like a pain.

    Regards:
    Oldbearcat :)
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,648
    I see this all the time. It's a tired old car tarted up with newer paint---the interior is tired, the chassis and suspension is decrepit, etc etc. He did the easiest part of the rwstoration of a car that's not worth very much even properly restored.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,355
    Yep, throw on a cheap set of wide whites and a brgain basement paint job and you may end up with a "50 footer".

    The closer you look, the worse things get. Like digging in a pile of manure. The more you dig, the worse it smells.

    I think he may be an owner for quite awhile.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,648
    If it runs really well he might get 1/2 of what he's asking.
2
Sign In or Register to comment.