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CVT vs. 5-speed manual

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Comments

  • jfljfl Posts: 1,334

    @nippononly said: Sadly Subaru, which was for the longest time firmly committed to offering manuals across a wide range of models, has in the last couple of years retreated on that. :-(

    They're just building what sells. And lots of people think paddle shifters are just like a manual ... but WE know they aren't!

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,669

    Are they building what sells, or are they selling what they build?! Sounds like I'm joking, but I'm really not...

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • saedavesaedave Chicago, ILPosts: 679

    CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) considerations now dictate the product mix. CVTs deliver the required economy improvement with the test procedures used. I would not be surprised to see Subaru drop all manuals in the next few years.

  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,669
    edited December 2013

    @saedave: They are designing them to the EPA test, not to predict real-world mileage. Lots of people were disappointed by the new Impreza CVT, getting way below rated mileage. Stick shift drivers, of course, went on getting the same superlative mileage they always have in their Subarus. ;-)

    By the way, I am sad to say you are probably right about the manuals comment, EXCEPT there is no way they drop the manual completely from the WRX/STi (and probably not from the BRZ either, if that model survives to gen II).

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • saedavesaedave Chicago, ILPosts: 679

    I think you are correct about manuals continuing in those very low volume models which would have little effect on CAFE.

  • bpeeblesbpeebles Posts: 4,080

    @nippononly said: saedave: They are designing them to the EPA test, not to predict real-world mileage.

    I wonder how many folks even know how the EPA does its MPG testing? I read thru the test-procedure a few months ago... Basically, it goes as follows:
    Known - Vehicle weight

    1. On level ground, the TIME is measured to coast to a stop from a specific speed
    2. From this, the aerodynamics of the vehicle can be calculated
    3. The above numbers are plugged into a computer
    4. Vehicle is scrapped into a machine that can test emissions,fuel-use, and other specifics
    5. The computer spits out the MPG numbers

    The important thing to keep in mind is that the vehicle is not ever driven on a road by the EPA folks. (Step 1 above is done by the manufacturer) The computer and its algorithms to calculate MPG is all that is used.

    The only way a manufacturer can 'sway' the results is to mis-represent the coast-down numbers. (which has happened in the past a couple times.)


    Personally, I ALWAYS get higher MPG than the EPA estimates. However, my driving-habits have been fine-tuned over many years of driving for economy. (My VW diesel is rated at 39MPG and I routinely get over 50MPG - I have a spreadsheet of fuel-purchases for every vehicle I own including Vespa scooter, Motorcycle and automobiles)

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