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The Current State of the US Auto Market

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited April 2013
    You continue to amaze me. "Standard of the World" is a 100-year old slogan of Cadillac's. Nothing more.

    Using the same, single word 25 times in a commercial is grating as hell, as well as painting the prospective owner as a real 'priss' for certain...mentioning his 'luxury' coffeemaker (really!) and 'luxury' home and everything else 'luxury' the guy owns. Talk about class warfare!

    Have you seen the commercial I'm talking about?

    Remember back to "Introduction to Marketing" class and you'll remember all about advertising slogans.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited April 2013
    Just guessing...work for the airlines or an industry that has an airline tie-in?

    I remain convinced that in buying nothing else can the price for the same service at the same time result in pricing 100% or more different.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,120
    It refers to standardized parts. Way back in the day, no two cars were totally alike. Cadillac learned how to make standardized parts for automobiles from firearms manufacturers.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    For the vast majority of my life, it's the slogan I remember Cadillac having as well...about as ubiquitous as "See the U.S.A....."

    The Acura commercial, IMHO, paints a pic of a really self-absorbed guy.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    Back in those days we actually had both a 76 Cutlass with an Olds 4bbl 350 and a 75 Malibu with a Chevy 2bbl 350 in our garage. My driving impression was that the Olds was smooth and quiet on the highway, but it sucked around town or trying to quickly pass. It had terrible lag which several dealers were unable to resolve.

    That's interesting...you'd think that the Olds would be better, having the 4-bbl carb?

    One thing I know they changed, from '75-76 was the standard axle ratio. It wasn't a huge difference, but in '75 they used a 2.56:1 axle on your typical 350+ CID car, but for '76 it was a 2.41:1 I wouldn't think a small difference like that would change things much, though.

    As for hp, I think the Chevy 350-2bbl only had 145 hp in 1975. Not sure what the Olds 350-4bbl had in 1976, probably around 170?

    But, HP doesn't mean everything, and can be deceptive. My '76 LeMans coupe has, depending on the source, either 165 hp (Consumer Guide) or 175 hp (Motor's Repair Manual, 1976 edition). But it definitely feels slower off the line than my '79 New Yorkers, which have 360-2bbls and only 150 hp. The NYer and LeMans are probably close in weight, and gearing is similar as well (2.41:1 for the LeMans, 2.45:1 for the New Yorker).

    I think one reason the NYer does pretty well taking off is that, even though it just has a 2-bbl, it has a huge throat, whereas the 4-bbl on the LeMans has fairly small primaries, and the secondaries don't open up until they're good and ready.

    Oddly, the NYer gets better highway economy as well. It can break 18 mpg with little effort, and there's been a few times I've even hit 20-21. But, I think about the best I ever got out of the LeMans was 17.5. Even 16 is a major accomplishment. The LeMans is better at highway passing though. Probably because someone put a shift kit in it though, rather than anything GM did to it when it was first built.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,120
    I still use some slogans myself. When somebody unjustly disses a car I drive, I use Packard's slogan "Ask the Man Who Owns One."

    A coworker who was shopping for a new car and knew I'm a big-time car buff asked my opinion on Buick, I replied, "When Better Automobiles are Built, Buick Will Build Them."

    My wife asked which car we were taking on a trip upstate, her car or mine, I responded, "Mercury: the Man's Car!"
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I always liked Buick's "Wouldn't You Really Rather Have a Buick?". To me, it cuts right to the chase! ;)

    The dealer we bought from in my hometown sold Chevy and Cadillac for many years. I remember once seeing an ad in the paper that said their name and had "Chevrolet" and "Cadillac" to the right, with a large space between the two brands, vertically. In the middle it said, "There's really nothing in-between!". I thought that was rather brash!

    Funny thing is, probably fifteen years later, they did add Olds and Buick when that dealership's owner retired.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited April 2013
    Just pointing out that just like airlines, other businesses regularly will vary rates to charge what the traffic will bear. Another example is the person who comes into the restaurant just before 4pm and gets the "early special" and the guy who comes in at 4:05pm gets the same food plate at a higher price. More open "seats" at the restaurant early means lower $$.

    You can add ocean cruise lines to your example, and it fits in vey nicely. Ships make most of their profit on the last 10% of the rooms sold, which is why the last minute travelers often see larger discounts than those booking months ahead. The first 90% goes to paying the cost of the cruise. So, in your analysis, I pretty much agree with you.

    A business pays more for phone service because a business uses a phone far more in peak times than an individual, and they use phones to make money. Give a business the option of metered service .vs. flat rate, and most will still prefer flat rate, because they know this as well.

    Cable companies can offer discounts from their customary "standard" rates, but who is going to buy cable when the company offers it at $49.95, only to find when you call to order you're told you have to pay a $10 monthly surcharge, just because there's a shortage of installers?

    However, ...

    I think the origin of the pricing "question" was started by dealers charging in excess of the suggested retail price, which by law, they are entitled to do.

    Personally, if I went into a restaurant, looked at the menu and prepared to order the $20 steak, and the waiter told me "the steak is in higher than normal demand tonight, so its going to cost you $25", I suspect I would simply walk out.

    Even if I really had my taste buds set for a steak, and decided to pay the "surcharge" that one time in order to get it, that would be the last meal that particular restaurant served me.

    Same goes with cars, TV sets, you name it.
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,353
    All the GM slogans backfired when they went bankrupt. Goes to show how much weight they REALLY carry. :)
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,847
    One slogan that I thought backfired, or ad campaign at least, was when they tried to use Meatloaf's "Paradise by the Dashboard Lights". They kept playing the "let me sleep on it, baby-baby" over and over again, and the draw was that they'd let you take a new GM car home overnight and if you didn't like it, could bring it back. Of course, there were probably catches such as mileage limits, you break it you buy it, etc...

    But, all I kept thinking was, what if you bought a car that was a turd, then you'd just be thinking about the end of that song..."Praying for the end of time, so I can end... my... time... with you!"
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Has anyone here seen the Acura commercial I'm talking about? Some have opinions, but I've not heard if anyone's actually seen it. (On Edmunds? An opinion without seeing something?!!!! ;))
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    LOL!

    Reminds me of Microsoft using the Rolling Stones "Start Me Up" song when it introduced Windows XP. At least, I think it was XP.

    If you start me up
    If you start me up I'll never stop
    If you start me up
    If you start me up I'll never stop
    I've been running hot
    You got me ticking gonna blow my top
    If you start me up
    If you start me up I'll never stop
    You make a grown man cry
  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,173
    Too funny Andre!
  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,173
    edited April 2013
    I wouldn't say it's honesty, more like arrogance... Big surprise there :sick:

    lol, "The Standard of the World" means squat outside of the RenCen. Never mentioned in any competitors commercials for as long as I can remember. It's usually the Big 3 European brands and lexus nipping at each other.

    Maybe when Mercedes starts offering Landau roofs, gobs of Chrome and Bling, Wire wheels and curb feelers then they'll reference Cadillac as competition. Wouldn't be surprised if they have a picture of a Ganged out Escalade in the cafeterias just get a chuckle out of what the "Yanks" think qualifies as a Proper Flagship. :D
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Maybe when Mercedes starts offering Landau roofs, gobs of Chrome and Bling, Wire wheels and curb feelers then they'll reference Cadillac as competition.

    Do you live in Florida, and have you seen a Cadillac in the last four decades?

    The reality of your comment is as ridiculous as my saying a new Camry looks like this:

    http://www.classycars.org/toyota.1961.toyopet.html

    What's arrogant is mentioning the owner's "luxury coffeemaker" (and I quote) in an ad for an Acura.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Up - we chat up commercials in this thread, let me grab a link for you:

    http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.ee92e94/7083#MSG7083

    We were just laughing at the luxury this, luxury that, ad from Acura.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Appreciate that; I don't look at that thread and it's good to see someone besides me thinks it's rather asinine. Here, talking about an entire commercial only gets compared to a 100-year old Cadillac slogan.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,167
    That Packard tag line is clever, but it would never pass the political correctness filter these days.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,737
    You continue to amaze me. "Standard of the World" is a 100-year old slogan of Cadillac's. Nothing more.

    I appreciate that I'm amazing. :blush:

    Saying "nothing more" is sort of a get out of jail free pass for Caddy. What if they said they were the best horseshoe maker in America? If it was 100 years old but wrong, wound't that make it a bit ridiculous?

    That might have been a good slogan 100 years ago. After the last 30 years and a BK, it's kind of arrogantly laughable to me.

    When customers KNOW there's not much behind a slogan, I'd say it's counter-productive. JMHO.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,737
    Just guessing...work for the airlines or an industry that has an airline tie-in?

    Not even close. ;)
This discussion has been closed.