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The Current State of the US Auto Market

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Comments

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,955
    Collaboration...lol...that's a way to put it.

    Some still insist the Chinese aren't copying, just influenced. Right.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,955
    Iphones are meant to be very user friendly - aka an idiot can't mess them up. So, you get no control. Turns me off. I also don't like the tight controls over their app store. The sync stuff is annoying too - my Android phone doesn't care about what's on my computer, nor should it.

    I once had an excellent flip phone, a Motorola V600. Huge build quality (metal case!) and it was one of the first bluetooth phones. I felt like I was from the future moving files from it via bluetooth. 9 years later, it is an antique.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,955
    And if they are old suits - you'll get BB, last choice will be Android. Some people at my workplace had to be dragged kicking and screaming.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    iPad proved popular, though, so we'll see. I guess they're easy enough to learn to use.
  • michaellnomichaellno Posts: 4,300
    That's one thing I hate about the iphone. You have very little control over it when you plug it in for an update. It starts automatically before you can pause it and manually choose what to sync, and if you don't do it properly it'll erase stuff you had on the iphone (if you don't sync some items).

    I've got an iPhone 4S and I've chosen NOT to upgrade to the latest version of iOS.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited February 2013
    That's one thing I hate about the iphone. You have very little control over it when you plug it in for an update. It starts automatically before you can pause it and manually choose what to sync, and if you don't do it properly it'll erase stuff you had on the iphone (if you don't sync some items).

    That's not exactly correct.

    You can easily disable the auto-sync function, and you can select what you want to sync by device.

    I do exactly that with the multiple Apple devices I have on my computer (iPad 2, iPhone 4), both with the latest iOS.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    It just seems more confusing than it should be and I'm computer literare!

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,388

    Consumer Reports has unveiled its list of top automotive picks for 2013, and the news isn’t great for Detroit. American brands were shut out of all 10 categories rated by the magazine.

    Honda was the big winner, its Accord, CR-V and Odyssey taking the top spot in the Midsize, Small SUV and Minivan categories, even as the Civic was beaten by the Hyundai Elantra for the Budget Car crown and Subaru Impreza in the Compact sedan class.

    The Toyota Prius stretched its streak as best Green Car to 10 years, while the Highlander was named best Midsize SUV and the FR-S from its Scion division tied for the best Sports Car win with its near twin, the Subaru BRZ.

    The Audi A6 and BMW 328i took the Luxury Car and Sports sedan segments, respectively, both cited for a combination of performance, comfort and fuel economy.

    Consumer Reports compiles its Top Picks list based on a combination of their results in the magazine’s road tests, reliability reports from its subscribers and government crash test ratings.

    Pickup trucks were left off this year’s list because the latest vehicles in the category were not yet available for testing
    .
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited February 2013
    According to all I read here, apparently CR doesn't take riding quiet into account for Honda to do so well. But I think they liked the Vega in '72 also. ;)

    They're people and are subjective, of course...just as the people there who rated the Malibu LT above several of the foreign competition, much to the chagrin of some here.

    What do they say now about Juke reliability?
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,388
    They're people and are subjective, of course...just as the people there who rated the Malibu LT above several of the foreign competition, much to the chagrin of some here.

    The problem is the US does not have the best cars on the market. Cost cutting devours good product and that is the case at the moment with the Small 3. Like it or not. ;)

    Regards,
    OW
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    edited February 2013
    I'm afraid an objective report would be that cost cutting is happening at Toyota and Honda as well. And Nissan...you know what they say about Ghosn, "Le Cost Cutter". And (sigh), as always, what's best for me isn't what's best for someone my Dad's age, or someone half my age.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    apparently CR doesn't take riding quiet into account for Honda to do so well

    They've tested both the new Civic and the new Accord, both have more insulation and are quieter.

    Honda's ratings improved, and then the Accord moved up, so I'm sure the quieter ride helped.

    The comments above were from the previous Accord and do not apply to the current offerings/rankings.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited February 2013
    cost cutting is happening at Toyota and Honda as well

    Depends on the model.

    The Accord got DI and a backup camera is now standard, what's the opposite of cost cutting? Re-contenting, maybe? Civic is better now, also.

    Toyota is refreshing the Camry after one model year to update the tech and add some nicer materials. Not unlike the refresh for the 'bu.

    Consumers have noticed and complain loudly, so they add stuff back. It's a cycle. The accountants say we can save 3 cents per unit here or there, then they see if anyone notices.

    This applies to both imports like the Fusion and domestically made cars like the Camry. ;)
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Hopefully no other terrible events in Japan will completely hamstrung assembly of those all-American Toyotas!

    (And it was terrible, absolutely no doubt.)
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    And HD Ford pickups, too!

    Hey, like it or not, it's a global economy. If the Camry is 90% American, it's still 10% from some place else. All it takes is a single part that isn't sourced from any other location.

    Remember they could not get a certain black paint?
  • On the contrary, I've read a few reviews that commend Honda for improving the NVH on the new Accord. Still not the quietest, but the db's have dropped 8 or 9 pts over the outgoing model.

    Juke reliability should be documented by now but I have not read anything bad on the Juke forums. Most people just don't like the looks (Including myself) :shades:
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Not being able to get black paint isn't exactly the same as halting production.

    In my lifetime, when there was a tire strike, new cars were shipped without spare tires (to be added later). Near the beginning of the U.S.'s involvement in WWII, cars were shipped with 'blackout' trim since chromium was needed early on in the war effort. Some of that 10% must be pretty major parts that cars couldn't be shipped without them.

    Make no mistake, I think imports built here is a humongous improvement over the way it used to be, but there are still a ton of Japanese millionaires because of Toyotas built here. I know a lot will say 'who cares?', but it has to be.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,196
    Heck, even after the war there were shortages. My Grandpop told me cars would arrive at the dealership with wooden planks in lieu of bumpers. You would have to go back to the dealer to get the bumpers installed after they arrived.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    AutoGuide says so:

    http://youtu.be/u-7mLNyirBk

    As do other reviews I've seen and read.

    Juke is the current ugly champ but the Jeep Cherokee is certainly a challenger for that title.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    wooden planks in lieu of bumpers

    Funny!

    Keep in mind Toyota has a just-in-time inventory system, so they don't exactly stock pile tons of spare parts. Dealers also have less than ideal supply, then and now.

    Once supply is cut off, production ceases.

    Camry was still the best selling car that year, so it didn't hurt them nearly as bad as it being implied.

    I recall there was a certain type of computer chip that was only made there, even VW was affected. They deleted some standard equipment on some models temporarily (backup cam? something like that).

    Beats a wooden plank for a bumper!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    Heck, even after the war there were shortages. My Grandpop told me cars would arrive at the dealership with wooden planks in lieu of bumpers.

    I've heard of that and in fact have seen photos of new cars so-equipped then.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,766
    Not being able to get black paint isn't exactly the same as halting production.

    I would call that a nitpick. If one random part or ingredient is not available, then it can halt production. In Ford's case it was luck that it was paint, and there were a lot of other colors, so only halted production for one color. If it is some other part that is critical to the entire line, then the line stops.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I think VW's was a chip used for the backup cam, so they actually could not produce models with a highly desirable package.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I think it is very clear that Ford did not utilize the number or type of Japanese-sourced parts as Toyota did.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,766
    I think it is very clear that Ford did not utilize the number or type of Japanese-sourced parts as Toyota did.

    Ultimately it's about US-content vs. others. And the "NA Sourced" measure is imperfect because it includes Canada (does it include Mexico as well?).

    What is the relative US sourced content of the two vehicles in question? Or are you just against Japanese parts, but not concerned about other non-US parts?
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    Juke is the current ugly champ but the Jeep Cherokee is certainly a challenger for that title.

    At least the Cherokee will be somewhat practical. The Juke is a bit useless, similiar to the old Suzuki X90 of the 90s.

    image

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,494
    I'm for the big picture....a combination of historical management corporate headquarters and design, place of manufacture of vehicle, engine, and trans, and percentage of NA parts (U.S. and Canada are combined on the content label), plus who employs the greatest number of Americans and utilizes the most U.S. suppliers and their employees. And yes, I'd prefer Canadian to Japanese as a supplier of parts for a number of reasons if it can't be U.S.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited February 2013
    In Ford's case their production would suffer far more if, say, a hurricane hit Mexico.

    The Japanese pay far better wages, Mexicans at auto plants work for peanuts.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,228
    "...similiar to the old Suzuki X90..."

    Well, not exactly, since the Juke has a back seat and more storage space than the X90.
  • boomchekboomchek Vancouver, BC, CanadaPosts: 5,108
    Ok, so a little bit more practical, but still not really an SUV, not really a sports car, smaller than most sedan. It's a neat personal car but that's about it.

    2007 BMW 328i Sports Pkg, 1993 Honda Accord EXR (my 33rd car).

This discussion has been closed.