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Mazda Protegé

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Comments

  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    start changing things as soon as they get their cars...and wonder why they don't run right?

    Don't you trust the engineers who designed it?

    My Pro LX 2.0L A/T is running fine. I didn't do anything the book doesn't recommend. The fuel economy is great and it runs like a...well...a PRO. It's joy to drive and I have no plans to change anything.

    Isn't that what it is designed to do?

    Personalize your Pros in some way that doesn't screw up the mechanicals and you will be a lot happier. Paint flames on the doors! LOL

    fowler3
  • protege_fanprotege_fan Posts: 2,405
    I know that it can be the result of not tightening the gas cap enough after filling up. Did you click it several times after putting the cap on? Not too sure what else it may be. I've had my Pro for 6 months (LX 2.0 5spd Canadian model) and I have had no (knock on wood) troubles.
  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,327
    Could be a spark problem. Best to check it out. Probably covered under warranty as it's part of the "powertrain". Your description could cause rough idle (I didn't fully connect a spark plug once and it cause pretty rough idle).

    I can't say I know what could cause a burnt popcorn smell, but burnt rubber doesn't smell like that to me. Some plastics do smell like burnt nuts, though (acrylic especially, but resins like ABS and nylon are more likely to be under the hood). There may be some wiring harness or hose out of place, so I'd search for the smell and use a strong light to look for burnt plastic or rubber.
  • Sounds like bad gas, or perhaps you didn't replace the fuel cap properly. Was the tank empty when you filled it? If so, there may have been some condensation in there that caused your hiccups.

    The 'check engine' light will probably have to be reset by the dealer. There's a memory buffer that needs to be cleared before the light will go out.

    You're car's almost certainly fine. I used to have this problem with my Maxima all the time -apparently it was very common. Get it checked out sooner rather than later for your own piece of mind, though.

    Regards,

    cp
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    That's weird about the GTI you drove. That car should not have been in the sales area of the lot. Apparently the PDI wasn't done right on it, or that stuff would have been fixed. I have a little rattle in mine, and the radio went crazy. But the same stuff happend to my Protege when new, so it's no big deal. Actually, my rotors in the Pro warped quickly instead of the rattle. I would rather deal with the rattle than warped rotors on a new car though.
  • Folks,

    Thanks for a number of quick replies. I will definitely take my car to the dealer. The nearest dealer to our place is ~20 miles south and every morning, my wife drives ~20 miles to the North; so it is really very inconvenient for me to drop my wife and take the car to the dealer (approx. 60 miles) in a weekday in Boston traffic; then taking the train back to downtown ...we'll see; I guess I have to do it, as you guys suggested, for the sake of "peace of mind!", even tough the car runs fine now.

    Thanks,
  • narenjinarenji Posts: 161
    I have a 93 MX6 with the same 2.0L engine and 5 spd, it burns next to no oil between oil changes- It's got 126k mi on it. I don't think they make Mazda's like they used to, although the Protege is definitely still a car made in the old Mazda way, I think and hope.

    The only thing the MX6 might need soon is a new clutch.

    Enjoy the Jetta and I hope it stays trouble free. I really looked at Golfs when I bought our Sentra in April (that car now traded for the WRX), but the reliability turned me off. I have to have a reliable car. Hope VW reliablity comes up-it's about time.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    Well, the turbo engine is not a VW engine, it belongs to Audi. That's one of the reasons why I got it. It seems like alot of people have had trouble with VR6 and 2.0 models, but not 1.8Ts. We shall see what happens I guess.
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    I didn't drive the GTI. It was reviewed by a journalist in my local paper. I can't believe VWOA didn't check the car out before giving it to journalist for testing. Talk about bad publicity.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    That doesn't seem right. That is totally inexcusable. I wouldn't want to be one of the employed at the dealership where that car came from... :)
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
    "Well, the turbo engine is not a VW engine, it belongs to Audi."

    That's a bit like saying a Ford has a Mercury engine.

    :)
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    From what I have heard, it seems all the engine problems come from the 2.0 and VR6 engines, not the 1.8T. The other two are original VW engines, the 1.8T an original Audi engine. Audi developed and designed it for use in their A4 and other cars, not VW. That's what I meant by that.
  • SporinSporin Posts: 1,066
    That engine is better because it's newer.. period. It was develped by VolkswagenAG. It's just as much a VW engine as it is an Audi engine.

    The 2.0 and VR6 are both considered to be reletively trouble free as well... now.

    The problems with VW's are not the drivetrain, it's the little stuff. Window Regulators, electrical gremlins, sensors, trim, etc, etc. All exasperated by the worst dealer/service network in the US(IMO).

    I had the 1.8T in my Passat and loved it, not one problem in 2 years/40k miles with the engine. But I had plenty of other stuff. Enough that I won't buy another VW, but not so many that I will trash the brand either.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    That's gotta be a record for LOW NUMBER of posts. Well, let me be the first to say, welcome back everyone!

    Meade
  • chikoochikoo Posts: 3,008
    to put in 195/55/TR15 Yokohama AVID T4 tires. He refuses to do so since the ES has V-rated tires as OEM..??****

    anyway, the next size is 205/55/VR15 AVID V4. Any ideas on how good are they?

    Did not find too many reviews on tirerack.
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    see you're back. yeah very little posts, most dealing with a crappy Jetta review (on a PRO board). Oh well.

    Chikoo: you can ask for a discount and have them installed somewhere else. I read somewhere (can't remember where) that you should stick to the original speed rating though.
  • maltbmaltb Posts: 3,572
    just isn't necessary. Have them mounted elsewhere chikoo.
  • elec3elec3 Posts: 160
    On a quick little jaunt to El Paso. Nearly 50 miles and about as many minutes to get to where I was going. I still think this would make a great little car for city commuting. It will hold 80mph with no problem if you ask it to and there is plenty of passing power from 60. Trying to pass at 80 is another story (hey, the speed limits here are 75, so it happens). This is just a good quick, zippy car - great for weaving in and out of traffic, and good brakes to get you out of trouble too. Of course my Pro5 is now stranded at the airport and it'll be a good 3 weeks before I see it again. Maybe I'll have to borrow my mom's Tribute a couple times so I don't suffer from zoom withdrawal :)
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    My Father just had to trade his Dodge Caravan company car in on a Ford Focus wagon. He told me to go drive it around and tell him what I think. Here are the pros and cons IMO:

    Pros:
    Tilt/telescoping steering wheel
    Feels tight, handles well, yet rides good
    Keyless entry opens wagon door
    High quality interior materials (Is this a Ford? My Mustang's interior was made out of cardboard!)
    Roomy
    Fun to drive

    Cons:
    Funky interior and exterior styling (I know styling is a subjective thing, but I don't know who could argue that the Focus is better looking than a Protege)
    Recall history (who knows, maybe they ironed out all the bugs for 2002)
    Coarse, gruff sounding engine (2.0L DOHC "zetec") compared to the Protege

    Conclusion: I think the Protege and Focus are remarkably similiar cars in the way they handle, their power output, and their european feel. While I am biased towards the Protege, I think Ford and Mazda have two of the best small sedan/wagons on the market. I've driven the new Corolla and Civic. The Corolla is painfully bland and the Civic is, well, a Civic.
  • protegextwoprotegextwo Posts: 1,265
    "Actually, my rotors in the Pro warped quickly instead of the rattle. I would rather deal with the rattle than warped rotors on a new car though."

    -vocus


    Well warped rotors can be identified replaced and repaired. I hope the V-dub techs can find and fix those elusive irritating rattles? :-)

    -Larry
  • pro es doesn't need v rated tires unless you drive down pikes peak full throttle with no brakes.

    Focus looks better than pro? Maybe more modern, but a bit awkward to my eyes.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    It's called washing your car, either at home or (god forbid) in one of those automated car scratchers -- anywhere where nice, cold water gets blasted on your hot rotors. I learned that after resurfacing my rotors three times on my Saab back in the 80s and finally receiving a helpful hint from the guy at Midas. Now I let the car sit at least a half-hour after driving it to wash it ... and I haven't had a warped rotor or pulsating pedal (except for ABS) in more than 10 years. If you see steam when you clean your wheels, you're asking for warped rotors.

    Paul ... warped rotors are not the fault of the car. The driver warps the rotors. As for rattles ... how hard do you slam your doors?

    Just thought I'd share. 'Tis the season, after all.

    Meade
  • sfratsfrat Posts: 205
    While cold water wouldn't help, they will need replaced just from normal use though. When would depend on type of driving, style of driving, and quality of the rotors. I really don't think its the "fault" of a drive if the rotors warped, they are a wear item. They're the same as tires and brakes. You can get a lot more life out of them depending on how you drive though.

    My dad has had four Ford Taurus for company cars, and everyone has needed new rotors after about 25k miles. He only has these problems on that car, so in that case its probably cheap parts. Anyway, that's just my thought. I would rather have warped rotors than rattles, because its a heck of a lot easier to fix the former.

    Steve
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    Rotors will WEAR over time ... but something other than normal wear accounts for warping. A rotor under normal use will get hot evenly across its surface. Warping is caused by a sudden change in temperature that causes the metal to expand too quickly and distort. You could say driving through puddles can do this too, but in most cases the tire will splash the water outward -- not up into the rotor. (Unless of course you drive through a 6-inch puddle -- which is not recommended either. And again, that's caused by the driver, not the car.)

    Meade
  • SporinSporin Posts: 1,066
    Overtorquing wheel lugs is a big cause of warped rotors too. Especially on hub-centric, FWD cars.

    That's why I've started doing it myself.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    http://cartalk.cars.com/Radio/Puzzler/Transcripts/200002/answer.html


    Rotors warp because (1) the driver drives too aggressively, causing the brakes to overheat; and then (2) does not allow the rotors to cool properly. It is not the fault of the car -- it's the fault of the driver.


    And oh sure, improperly torqued lug nuts also are blamed for warped rotors. Again, not the fault of the car.

    Meade

  • sfratsfrat Posts: 205
    I was under the impression that heat can also cause things to warp, and that over time, they would become distorted as well. I've never had a problem, and I would agree that spraying cold water is not the best thing either. But it is conceivable that the rotors could warp just from heat alone, before they actually wear out? Or am I totally misguided. :-)
  • sfratsfrat Posts: 205
    a lot of stop and go city driving could cause premature warping as well then, which my dad does.

    BTW, post #6539 was put up before I saw #6538

    Also, I passed 9k miles on my 01 ES that I got mid February.

    Steve
  • chicagoprochicagopro Posts: 1,009
    AAGH! So does this mean I can never wash my car again?

    I can't wash at home, because I live in an apt building. How about if I drive a few blocks to one of those DIY places? Will the rotors still be cool enough if that's my first stop of the day? And then should I let the car sit a while? Had no idea that cars were so sensitive.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    how hot rotors get. After you drive home from work today, reach down and VERY carefully bring your finger close to one of your rotors. I'll bet you can't touch it because it's so hot.

    You ever pulled the coffee pot off the burner and had a drop or two hit the hot plate underneath it? Notice the fizzle and spray as the water instantly changes to steam? Now imagine getting your hose out and dousing that plate with cold water. Probably crack, wouldn't it?

    Would you spray cold water on your hot exhaust manifold?

    It's not a sensitivity issue ... it's a sensibility issue. Just give the car a chance to cool down a little. I've taken my car to the "Car Pool" before, where they vacuum your car prior to washing it. Usually the 20 minutes or so that it takes to wait in line and have the car vacuumed is enough cool-down time so the rotors don't sizzle and steam when the water hits 'em.

    Meade
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