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Mazda Protegé

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Comments

  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,327
    Get yourself some spray silicone lubricant. You might want to use a light grease on the door hinges.

    As far as tightening bolts, get your car up on ramps and poke around for any loose bolts underneath. I didn't find any on mine when I looked. Found some rust, sprayed some anti-rust on it to chemically change it into a primer-like substance.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    Bite me.

    Meade
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    My apologies if someone posted this link already, but this site has some EXCELLENT photos that you can click on twice for screen-size closeups! Enjoy!


    http://www.velocityjrnl.com/jrnl/2003/vmd2867ml.html


    Meade

  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    There are an awful lot of bolts underneath the car. I find it hard to believe that the dealer "tightens bolts" at service intervals. What do they do? Go through the service manual and check every load bearing bolt underneath the car to make sure it's torqued properly? I doubt it. I don't think there is anything at the 30,000 mile service that couldn't be done in your garage.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    For the 30K service on the 99 DX (the 2001 didn't make it that far), I took the car to my local garage and had the major stuff done. It ended up only being a tune-up and oil change. I also had to have the brake pads changed and the rotors resurfaced. The total was $130 or something close to it (it's been awhile, so I might be off a little). Better than $300+ at the dealer for the same thing!
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    You probably could have saved $100 and did it in your garage.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    Well I don't have a garage. I don't even have space to wash my car at home without dragging the hose up the alley next to my house.

    This might change soon, as I am contemplating putting a parking pad in the back of my house and knocking down the patio that's there. It's old anyway and kinda sloppy looking, and parking is getting more and more difficult around my area. So it might be worth it in the longrun. Definitely will add value to the house. So if I do that, then I will start doing little things (oil changes, washing, etc.) at home.
  • meinradmeinrad Posts: 820
    I'll gladly pay that extra $100 and not do that work in my garage. I don't like working on my car, I don't want to take the time to work on my car. I'm even paying someone to wax my car.

    It's gotten so old reading on all these forums that everytime someone brings up Jiffy Lube, or getting a service done at (oh lord don't say it)a dealer, they are told how they cold do it themselves.

    Well 'do it yourselfers', I'm speaking up for the 'let someone else do its'! It doesn't make you a bad person, it doesn't mean you don't love your car, and it doesn't matter what you spend if you have the money and you feel comfortable with the person performing service.
  • While driving in the left lane, at 70 mph, on the Interstate, in the dark, this morning - I noticed that all the vehicles around me were full size trucks or suv's. I felt like a cheeta running with bulls. Some people like a lumbering vehicle. I'll take quickness & agility (with my 02 ES) any day. P.S. For background - I've been driving for more yrs than I care to mention - with no wrecks.
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    I like to think along the same lines too. Will never buy a truck. 3/5DR HBs, 2 dr coupes or 4Dr sedans for me.

    Dinu
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    Hey, I respect those who don't want to do their own maintanence. I still follow the old saying that if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself, especially if you're talking about vehicle service. I've seen enough crap happen at dealerships and Jiffy Lube type places to make me not trust anyone. I used to work at these places. I'll do everything I can on my car and only use dealerships and service centers as a last resort.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    I am very funny with my car though. I like the peace of mind involved in doing stuff yourself. Because you know how it was done and that it was done properly. I know how to do some stuff on my car, but I just don't have the time or space right now.
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    by the GRE... :(
  • ashutoshsmashutoshsm Posts: 1,007
    That bad, huh? Sucks. Well, one of the good things about it is that you can always do it again!
  • dinu01dinu01 Posts: 2,586
    I'll ask them what EXACTLY they do for that tightening the bolts svc. It seems ridiculous to me that they will crawl under the car and check every bolt. It will take hours!

    I too prefer to do things myself on my car, but I don't have space to do it. Next year (when the 2nd PRO will be bought) we're moving in a newly-built house, so I'll have plenty of space. I was even thinking of asking the builder to dig a hole in the garage so I can out a svc bay to change oil underneath the car. I bet it would cost $$$!

    Dinu
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    "I like the peace of mind involved in doing stuff yourself. Because you know how it was done and that it was done properly."

    Exactly. You can't put a price on piece of mind.
  • the_big_hthe_big_h Posts: 1,583
    killed the math section, bombed the verbal section. the written essay won't be graded for another 2 weeks...
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    I don't think they will check any bolts. In order to properly check all of these bolts, they would have to loosen every bolt, then re-torque them to spec. You can just throw a torque wrench on a bolt and check it.
  • (preferably in a small shop) by having him do the routine things. That way one has someone to go to when big projects come up.
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    That's true. I have a guy who will do the big stuff like timing belt/water pump when it comes up. I'd be embarrassed to bring my car to him for oil changes though.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    I agree with you that doing things yourself (a) instills a level of pride, and (b) ensures you did it right.

    However, some people, including, to an extent, me, don't have the (a) knowhow, (b) time, (c) proper tools, or (d) work area to do vehicle maintenance. Case in point: I have a gravel driveway made up of large, railroad-grade gravel. While I am very used to changing my own oil and have been doing so since I owned my first car in 1985, and have all the ramps, oil pans, wrenches, and tools I need, it's still a pain in the [non-permissible content removed] (and the back, elbows and knees) to perform this menial task at my house. It's easier to just take the car up to my Goodyear guy and pay him $16.95.

    Same goes for tire rotation. Yep, got the 2-ton floor jack and jack stands. But nowhere to place them.

    (BTW, this all might be a moot point come November -- I've got a guy coming out to give me an estimate on paving my driveway this afternoon!!!! Merry Christmas two months early (maybe), Zoomster!!!)

    Meade
  • meinradmeinrad Posts: 820
    "Exactly. You can't put a price on piece of mind."

    You are right, that's one reason I'll let someone else do it. I could just as easily strip a bolt, or something as well as the shop. If I do, I have to pay for the repair, if a shop does it, they pay for it.

    I get piece of mind letting someone who does this kind of work for a living do it, rather than doing it myself just to save a few bucks. If you don't have the time or the real desire to do it, you might hurry, not be as careful, whatever.

    PS. Do you die hard do it yourselfers ever eat at restaurants? I would think for piece of mind you'd always cook your own food. Have you ever seen some of those kitchens?
  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,327
    Unless you complain to them about squeaking noises from the chassis.

    As far as lubricating, I think they use spray silicone and a grease gun (from my last post-service visual inspection), and very messily I might add.

    I started out getting most servicing done outside, but have decided to do more of it myself due to some screw-up. I think for the simpler tasks that I take on, they let the less experienced staff tackle. Also, I think they take short-cuts, like using the pneumatic impact driver both thread and tighten wheel bolts (I've had to replace damaged lug bolts twice due to damage done this way), and just rush the job in general.

    The more messy stuff, I get garages to do, but I check it out after the work has been done. It still gets messed up on occasion, like when they forgot to put the seals on the new rear bearings on my '89 323 (I didn't notice any problems, but just had them replaced as preventive maintenance), leading to grease being spread all over my rear wheels and tires. Oh well. It pays to find a good garage. I still haven't found one yet that hasn't done something wrong, even those that have been recommended to me highly by friends. Guess I just have poor luck.
  • mazdafunmazdafun Posts: 2,327
    Same goes for take-out.

    Ick. :P

    It takes a lot more effort to cook, but we get sick less often.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    I know exactly what you mean by that. If I prepare it myself, I know my hands are clean, the raw product is good, etc. :)
  • Hey Protege owners. . . .

    Tell me what you think about this used Protege I found. Its a '99 Protege LX, $35,000 miles, all the "power options" (which I actually don't care too much about), spoiler, cd, etc.

    Drove it yesterday. Since I'm used to driving old Lincoln's/Buicks/Trucks, any economy car feels really weird. This felt pretty similar to a Honda I was considering, and also Saturns I have driven in the past.

    Did a Carfax on it today. The dealer had said they bought it at a car auction (its a Ford dealer and she told me they basically do this so they don't have a lot full of used Fords). Carfax said it was a lease/commercial vehicle. This doesn't alarm me as much as it might otherwise, as I have friends who drive work vehicles and have put 30,000 miles on those in a year, and this one seems to have low miles for being a '99.

    Lets hear your thoughts!
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    Like I said before, I understand why some people don't do some services themselves. If you don't trust yourself, don't do it. If someone else screws your car up, you have something to fall back on---usually. The problems start when the mechanic tells you "it was like that before" or when they break something and charge you to fix it. Most people wouldn't have a clue and end up paying for something that the shop screwed up. It happens more often that you would think. I brought my Mustang into a place that I trusted once for drivability problems. They wanted to put an $800 ECU in it and they would have. I decided to check things out myself and it ended up being a bad cap and rotor that had been replaced recently. Why didn't the shop check the simple things first? Because an ECU will get them more money. How many people would have shelled out $800 for the ECU? My guess is that most people would have.

    As far as food goes, I don't eat at fast food joints that often. They have some pretty good quality stuff here in downtown Mpls, much better than I could do.
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    But you didn't address MY point.

    In my case, I'm taking my car in for routine service that's too back-breaking to do at home. I know what I'm taking the car there for, so there's really no way they can screw me. I'll only pay for what I ask for.

    What you're talking about is people who are ignorant and/or inept. I would like to think that most of us here aren't described by those adjectives; therefore I thought this debate was more about convenience and preferences than carbuffs vs. idiots.

    If we're going to debate the latter, then sure, I agree -- all idiots get screwed by mechanics. They can see 'em coming a mile away!

    Meade
  • newcar31newcar31 Posts: 3,711
    I understand what you're saying, but mechanics can always find extra stuff to do if they want to, and believe me, you don't have to be an idiot to be taken by a mechanic. When that shop told me I needed an ECU, I believed them, kind of. I had no clue what was wrong with the car. I was shocked to learn it would be $800 to fix and I didn't have the money. Out of desperation, I brought my car home and checked everything related to the ignition that I could. I didn't expect the cap and rotor to be bad since they were just replaced recently. On a hunch, I put the old cap and rotor back on and it was fixed. You could say that I should have done this before I took it to the shop but how was I supposed to guess that a brand new cap and rotor would be defective?

    Bottom line is if doing your own maintenance is too much of an inconvenience for you, you have to let someone else do it. I can understand that this is the situation for many people. Luckily, it's not my situation.
  • vocusvocus Posts: 7,777
    The same thing happend once to an old car of my mother's. They tried to say the battery was bad in it. It turned out to be a defective alternator, which I found out by taking it to a friend of mine and having it tested. Saved me $60, since the alternator had just been replaced and was still under warranty.
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