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Toyota Tundra Problems

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Comments

  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    The two problems that you report are common on some tundras.

    First, the brake shimmy is due to warpped rotors on a lot of 2000 and 2001 Tundras. There is a TSB out on that one and you can get it fixed under warranty. I would make sure that you use you parking brake when you park. Using the parking brake rests the front to rear brake bias on the Tundra due to the fact that the Tundra runs drums in the rear.

    Second, the bump from the tranny that you hear is due to the drive shaft bindind. When you hit the brakes the weight of the shaft will push on the tranny causing it to bind. when yoiu release the brake you will release the pressure on the shaft and it will do a bump sound. The way to fix this is to remove the shaft from the tranny and grease the splines (thanks to hillhound's post on GM trucks site I know what the splines are) of the U joint. I was told that this process will take care of the problem. Use high quality grease that has a long life. I have the bump, but it is occasional. I want to try the above process to solve the problem, but I have not had the time.

    This is also a common problem on Chevys as reported on the Chevy Truck board. Hillhound has posted about it and does give a goood explantion of the process to fix it.

    You can take your truck to the dealer and demand that they grease the splines and see if they will do it for you. If they give you a song and dance routine, go to the NHTSA site and print the page from the 2000 Tundra that reports on this problem.

    Here is a copy of the complaint:

    ODI ID: 726251 Make: TOYOTA TRUCK Model: TUNDRA Year: 2000

    Incident: No
    Fire: No
    Number of Injuries: 0
    Date of Failure: 04/20/2000
    Component: POWER TRAIN:TRANSMISSION:AUTOMATIC
    Summary: CONSTANT BINDING OF THE TRANSMISSION. AFTER COMING TO A COMPLETE STOP, VEHICLE WILL JERK FORWARD AS THOUGH IT HAS BEN HIT IN THE REAR-END. THIS WILL ALSO HAPPEN AFTER COMING TO A COMPLETE STOP, AND AFTER BRAKE PEDAL IS RELEASED, VEHICLE WILL JERK. AT TIMES, AND AFTER COMING TO A COMPLETE STOP AND SITTING FOR A FEW MINUTES, VEHICLE WILL JERK FORWARD AS THOUGH IT HAS BEEN HIT IN THE REAR-END. VEHICLE FEELS AS THOUGH THE TRANSMISSION IS BINDING WHEN BRAKES ARE APPLIED. ONCE BRAKES ARE RELEASED, BINDING IS RELEASED, AND JERKING BEGINS. I HAVE TAKEN VEHICLE TO THE DEALERSHIP WITHIN A FEW WEKS OF PURCHASE TO HAVE PROBLEM CORRECTED, ONLY TO BE TOLD NOTHING WAS WRONG, EVEN THOUGH THEY WERE AWARE OF THE PROBLEM, BUT THERE WAS NO FIX. I HAVE SEARCHED THE INTERNET, AND HAVE READ VARIOUS COMPLAINTS BY OTHER TOYOTA TUNDRA OWNERS EXPERINCING THE SAME PROBLEM, BUT TOYOTA FAILS TO RECONIZE THE PROBLEM.
  • I had no such complaint with my '99 Z71, or my present Duramax diesel. What we have is a classic double standard. Mere damage control by the import tuners on how these complaints are "okay" because they are known, documented, unfixed problems. Just proves the point made by the service advisor to Rstubener when he told him, "they all do that".

    Doesn't change the fact that Tundra is manifestly possessed by design woes, and owners are complaining to the government about problems at a rate double G.M. or Ford.
  • obyoneobyone Posts: 8,065
    may have hit closer to home regarding Toyota's world class service. Seems that certain owner's aren't getting the service they need or ask for. Why?

    Look at Pluto for example. He doesn't deny driving a one star side impact rated truck. Yet he proclaims Toyota is tops in quality. I personally think its hyporcritical on both Toyota's and Pluto's part. Why didn't they correct his problem? It's a known fact that the Toyota engineers went back to the drawing board to correct the error in the following years yet they haven't done anything to address the issue with regards to what Pluto drives. I just hope he doesn't have a family cause I would consider it abusive to insist that they ride in that truck with him.
  • hennehenne Posts: 407
    Im confused. Edmunds has this listed as the Toyota Tundra Problems forum. Have they got Chevy stuff mixed in here too? I dont see why people are posting Chevy problems in the Tundra forum.

    If the Edmunds moderator is reading this, I think there is a mixup of forums. Its annoying to read Chevy problems when Im looking for Tundra problems.

    It would be great if this could be fixed. If I wanted to read about Chevy, I would be over in the Chevy forum. Because Chevy is Chevy and Tundra is Tundra. Can we all say Tundra? Very good boys and girls. Now someone please post Tundra stuff.

    Thanks and I hope this gets fixed soon.

    Robert
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    Please stop posting in TUNDRA threads. You do not own a Tundra. Please go post in the Chevy problem thread. There are people here like Robert who want to know about the Tundra problems. You guys are increasing the non-Tundra related posts.

    Regards
  • Let me know if putting grease in the yoke splines fixes your Tundra's clunk/bump. I had an older Dakota that had this same bothersome noise, but the yoke had a grease fitting which made it alot easier to get grease in there.
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    The thing that worries me about removing the shaft is getting it out of alignment. That might cause vibrations from the shaft. I want to get an FSM before doing the procedure. I wish there was osme way I can squeeze grease in there w/o removing the shaft.

    Thanks for explaining the proceedure on the GM truck board. I finally understood what was going on.
  • eric2001eric2001 Posts: 482
    Not sure on your Tundra, but every driveshaft I have ever removed only fits in one-way (double wide spline at one point) so there isn't an alignment issue. Besides, if you aren't moving the rear end or the transmission/transfer case, there isn't any alignment issue.

    Hope this eleviates any concerns on greasing the splines, as it is an easy job. The only recommendation, if it is 4WD, point the front down hill to keep the fluid in the transfer case (driveshaft is seal for fluid) when removing spline from transfer case.
  • bamatundrabamatundra Posts: 1,583
    Every drive shaft I have removed can go back in as many positions as there are splines - 30 splines, 30 positions. I don't know about the Tundra.

    The relative positions of the yokes on the u-joints is critical. If they are not in the correct postition you will introduce vibration and additional strain on the driveshaft, u-joints and bearings.

    The best idea is to use a chisel or punch to mark the two pieces and be absolutely sure you put them back the same way they were when you disassembled them.
  • bamatundrabamatundra Posts: 1,583
    I think I remember reading in Tundra Solutions that there is a grease fitting. Be careful not to put too much grease in as this can be just as bad as not enough. Grease in non-compressible so if you put too much in, the shaft will bind.
  • eric2001eric2001 Posts: 482
    Sorry, didn't know on the Tundra. I would recommend a chisel/punch or even something as simple as a grease pencil for marking. But the procedure is relatively simple, but tedious.
  • arkie6arkie6 Posts: 198
    On the vast majority of Tundras that experience the thump or bump in the rear when you come to an abrupt stop, it is due to binding in the driveshaft slip yoke. When you come to an abrupt stop, the rear of the truck rises up and elongates the driveshaft (via the slip yoke) in the process. Once you come to a stop, the back of the truck settles back down and the driveshaft compresses. If the truck is in gear, there will be some rotational torque applied to the driveshaft even when stopped. This rotational torque tends to increase the sliding friction in the slip yoke. If the slip yoke is not really well lubricated or the machining is not perfect, the slip yoke will tend to bind up and not compress. Then after you come to a stop, the transmission will downshift. During the downshift, the torque on the driveshaft is released which reduces the friction in the slip yoke and it will compress rather abruptly. This is the "thump" or "bump in the rear" that you are likely feeling. As a test to comfirm, shift the transmission to nuetral before coming to an abrupt stop. If you don't get the "thump" when you do this, but you do get it when the transmission is in drive, then it is very likely binding in the slip yoke.

    Ok, now that you have determined that it is binding in the slip yoke, you can either fix it yourself or convince your dealer to do it. Dealers don't make much money on warranty repairs unless parts are replaced, so they often may opt to replace the entire driveshaft assembly, which is fine as long as they hand lube the slip yoke with some good quality grease. But replacement of the driveshaft is typically not necessary. The slip yoke just needs to be greased properly, particulary on the 4x4s. 4x4s have the slip yoke at the back of the driveshaft where it connects to the rear end pinion shaft. The 4x4 driveshaft uses 4-bolt flanges at the rear end as well as at the transfer case output shaft. The 4x2 on the other hand has the slip yoke in the tailshaft of the transmission and as far as I know (I have a 4x4) is lubricated by the transmission fluid. I have heard of 4x2s with the thump, but most problems are with the 4x4s. The 4x2s may benefit from had greasing the slip yoke splines, but I have not confirmed this.

    The 4x4 driveshaft slip yoke has a zerk fitting for adding grease; however, it is not very effective at getting grease at the point where the friction is taking place. There is a large void under the zerk fitting and it may take 30-40 pumps on a grease gun to actually get any grease on the splines, depending on how much if any grease was in there to begin with. The splines and seal are very tight and you may encounter significant resistance on the grease gun while grease is migrating along the splines. I've had my driveshaft apart examining the slip yoke and you have two options to properly grease the splines. One is to drop the rear driveshaft where it attaches to the rear end via the 4 bolts (always match-mark the two flanges to ensure you put them back in the same position - also, turn the bolts, not the nuts since the nuts have a high friction base flange to resist turning) and pull the slip yoke apart (again, match mark both halves of the slip yoke to ensure they go back together in the same relative position - the splines do have a wide spline to prevent mismatch; however, it is hard to see which one it is especially with grease on them and it's a pain trying to find just the right spot where they will slip together - match-marking the two halves before disassembly makes this much easier). Once the slip yoke is apart is then readily apparent why putting 5 or 10 shots of grease in the zerk fitting won't do any good. You can then hand lube the splines with a good quality grease. I would clean out as much of the existing grease as possible, but as long as you use a lithum base grease there should be no compatibility problems. Toyota recommends a lithium base NLGI#2 chassis grease for this. I recommend a lithium base molybdenum disulfide (moly) NLGI#2 chassis grease for this, the same grease that Toyota recommends for the double cardon joint. Once you've got everything greased up good, slide the yoke halves back together using the match marks to guide you then put the both flanges together, again using the match marks as a guide, install the bolts and nuts and torque. I think the torque is about 40 ft-lbs, but I don't have my manual handy at the moment. Torque from the bolt head, not the nut since the nut has a high friction base. After it is all together, shoot about 5-10 strokes of grease in the zerk fitting for "reserve", but you do not want it completely full as this will limit compression of the slip yoke.

    If all that is a little more than you want to tackle, here is an easier way that is probably just about as effective. Take your grease gun loaded with lithum base moly chassis grease and start pumping grease in the slip yoke zerk fitting. At some point you will encounter significant resistance on the grease gun handle and will likely note that the slip yoke is expanding. Slowly add grease at this point. You will likely see the slip yoke expand on each pump of the handle and then slowly contract. Continue adding grease for about 5-10 more strokes unless you see grease coming around the seal, then stop. Now get on the rear bumper and bounce it up and down a few times. This will tend to compress the slip yoke and force more grease along the splines. Now take a wrench and remove the zerk fitting to allow excess grease to escape. Once the zerk is removed, if a tablespoon or so of grease doesn't come out, then gently bounce on the bumper again to give it a little help. Once the excess grease is out, re-install the zerk, clean up the mess, and you are good to go.

    This was known as the "arkie6 fix" over at Tundrasolutions and it resolved many of the "thump" problems people were experiencing, mine included. I initially used the straight lithum base chassis grease on the slip yoke and I started getting a hint of "thump" after about 5,000 miles. I subsequently put in the lithium base moly (an extreme pressure additive) grease and haven't had any hint of "thump" in 15,000+ miles. My truck (2000 Tundra 4x4) now has 28,000+ miles and is "thump" free.

    Alan
  • Tundra driveline "thump" by arkie6

    Well said. I pumped in Mobil 1 ( non moly ) until resistance felt, jumped up & down on the rear bumper and have not had any clunk since. I will most likely use moly on everything in the future.
  • I appreciate the advice, but that's way more than I want to tackle. Besides, the dealer should have known to lube the splines if that's the problem. It still feels like it's inside the transmission to me. I plan to discuss your fix with the service advisor.

    I had hoped when I decided to invest in a very expensive used truck, that with the reputation and backing of Toyota, I would not be saddled with design flaws, which this appears to be. This type of driveshaft maintenance, if necessary, is burdensome, if as you say, they should have put the slip yoke up front.

    I've have also noticed in places, the paint is chipping. Anybody have this problem?
  • Very good explanation of things, I think it will benefit all experiencing the problem.
  • I have a 2002 Tundra SR5 with just over 1000 miles. I have felt the "thump" from the rear of the truck since I drove it home from the dealership. Took it back yesterday to the dealer from whom I purchased the truck and they could not find anything wrong with the truck. I took the mechanic for a test drive and he told me the thunk is perfectly normal, just the truck torquing down at times. I'm not going for it and am taking it to another dealership next week. Another problem I've had is the brakes chattering or vibrating when I take off from a dead stop. The vibration is barely noticeable but I can still feel it. When reported to the dealership, they never took any of the tires or wheels off to check the linings. Am kind of fed up with the truck already after only having it for 6 weeks. One thing they did fix was a vibration coming from the passenger side (interior) compartment. The mechanic found it was an air conditioning hose coming in through the firewall. It's fixed. At least something went right.
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    If you scroll up there is a very long and usefull post on how to get rid of your thump. I have the thunp as well in my 4X2 Tundra. It does not happen as much as it used to. I am begining to think that the thump happens early because the splines have not borken in. Once they have broken in, it seems that the thumps subside or go away entirely. Today I did not even have a single thump while driving to truck to and back from work.

    I say give the truck some more time to break in. I have 4K miles on mine and I still love the truck. If you still do not like your truck 5K miles from now, then sell it and get a Chevy/Ford/Dodge. I am aure that you will like those much better :-P
  • From reading these posts, and talking to the service advisor, I'm beginning to think there must a problem with this design. How can there be so many dry, unlubed splines out there? It seems like this problem is common to both 4x4 and 4x2 models, in which case, arkie6's explanation about the splines being forward on the 4x2 making it not susceptible to the thump is in error.

    If ndahi12's truck is suffering this problem with only 4k miles, this is flawed. What's an owner to do? Lubricate the splines every oil change? Splines should not need this much attention. I still think it's coming from the transmission.
  • f1julesf1jules Posts: 288
    You do not need to re-lube the splines every oil change. From what I've heard you really only need to do it once, or until the thump goes away. Once it's done you shouldn't have to do it again.
  • hennehenne Posts: 407
    Most all trucks do this and I think that solution just might fix it. I have owned many trucks and they have all pretty much done it. I think they put little lube on the spline because it doesnt really move much and I think that is where the problem is. It does move when you accelerate and brake.

    Lube it up

    Robert
This discussion has been closed.