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Mazda Protege5

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Comments

  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Thanks for the information and tips, Allen.

    I have been eyeing the Mazda3 myself but am holding out for the next generation in anticipation of another bump in horsepower, although the 160HP is likely more than enough for my pedestrian needs. Looking forward to your next installment.
  • I got my new alloys today, no argument required. Also had all the brake calipers replaced under the warranty, no other problems so far (44244 miles, just within the 3 year warranty). Now I just need to decide on tires. Quickly given the snow accumulating outside my NY door.
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,909
    every Tuesday we have have a chat based on a Mazda platform (although we do tend to wander to all kinds of subjects) where you can meet and greet your fellow forum members. Hope to see YOU there tonight!

    PF Flyer
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    The MAZDA chat is on TONIGHT. Stop in for a holiday visit! Check out the schedule

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  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Hi everyone,

    I thought it would be interesting to hear from everyone out there on their experiences with major maintenance, modifications/upgrades and additions. By major, I mean more than a few dollars, let's say $50+.

     

    Here are mine:

     

    Model:

    Protege5 2002 automatic 43,000KM (approx. 26,000 miles)

     

    Maintenance:

    2 year regular maintenance : C$250

    brake calipers serviced : C$100

     

    Modifications/Upgrades:

    none

     

    Additions:

    BF Goodrich Slalom winter tires + rims (C$700)

     

    Verdict:

    Great car!
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,909
    After a bit of a software snafu last week, we'll try to get a harder count on how many of you are coming to the Philadelphia Auto Show on Feb 5th and 6th (that's the first weekend of the show) so we can figure out how many goodies we might need! So stop in at one of the chats this week and let us know!

     

    PF Flyer

    Host

    Pickups & News & Views Message Boards


     

    The MAZDA chat is on TONIGHT. Stop in for a holiday visit! Check out the schedule

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? pf_flyer@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    On a recent outing to Montreal from Ottawa my 2002 Protege5 automatic averaged 35 mpg for the 450 km round trip.

     

    The average since the beginning (June 2002) is 30 mpg.

     

    Driving pattern: 50% highway 50% city driving.

     

    Verdict: Great car, great mileage.
  • dwryterdwryter Posts: 87
    Either you drive very gently or you have a particularly good P5. Over the years several P5 automatic owners have complained about mileage in the low 20's. I wonder if the Canadian version is different, perhaps with less smog-reduction equipment.

     

    My 5-speed averages 27 in 50/50 driving and about 32 highway, with speed generally between 75 and 80. I once had to drive 200 miles with the dinky spare mounted (couldn't find a replacement tire for the blowout), keeping speed below 60MPH, and got 38MPG. I don't expect to see that number again.

     

    autonomous wrote:

    ----------------

    On a recent outing to Montreal from Ottawa my 2002 Protege5 automatic averaged 35 mpg for the 450 km round trip.

     

    The average since the beginning (June 2002) is 30 mpg.

     

    Driving pattern: 50% highway 50% city driving.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Hi Joel,

    You said "My 5-speed averages 27 in 50/50 driving and about 32 highway, with speed generally between 75 and 80. I once had to drive 200 miles with the dinky spare mounted (couldn't find a replacement tire for the blowout), keeping speed below 60MPH, and got 38 MPG. I don't expect to see that number again."

     

    38 MPG! I guess you get top prize for mpg from a Pro!

     

    You may want to go back to posts 7114, 7120, 7125, 7126 for some numbers quoted by kauai (where are you?) and others. Many are in the same ballpark.

     

    It would be a surprise to me if there was less smog-reduction equipment on the Canadian versions. We're big on Kyoto in this country!

     

    I do all the regular things to use less fuel (minimize warm-up time, reduce the number of short trips by running multiple errands, freeway in the the low 70s (aka 120 km), and glide). Speaking of which I don't see enough people gliding to a stop instead of white knuckling each light. Why are we racing to the next block when we know we won't make the light?

     

    Now all I need to do is switch to that "dinky spare"!
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    ".....I don't see enough people gliding to a stop instead of white knuckling each light."

     

    I agree. It not only saves fuel, but extends the life of one's brake pads considerably.
  • dwryterdwryter Posts: 87
    Getting 38 MPG almost killed me.

     

    Though I stayed in the far-right freeway lane, my drive home to San Diego took me through Los Angeles and Orange County. And many folks there consider driving slower than 70 a capital offense. I can't tell you how many times I was cut off and given the single-finger wave.

     

    At the same time, I had to deal with the fools who drift onto the freeway at 35 MPH, chatting on their cellphones, expecting the right-laners to slow down to let them in.

     

    That's why I don't expect to see 38 MPG again. Sometimes I try very hard to keep my speed down to 65, but around here, that's very hard to do because everyone drives at his/her own speed, often regardless of everyone else. I'd really like to see suggested speeds for each lane, which should greatly improve the flow of traffic and reduce both lane-changing and frustration. The #1 lane should be used only for passing. Anyone in that lane who's holding up traffic would be cited, then tasered.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    "The #1 lane should be used only for passing. Anyone in that lane who's holding up traffic would be cited, then tasered."

     

    Can I borrow that taser? There are several other situations in which it may come in handy.

     

    Let's start with a mild taser shot for the following:

    - driving over that white line to stop in the pedestrian crosswalk while forcing other motorists to make a wide turn to avoid taking off your front bumper

    - routinely not signalling especially while waiting at a light or making lane changes at 70+ mph

    - screaming down a road in a school district

    - merging onto the highway in rush hour traffic while dialing your sweetie

     

    There are other more severe, mind-numbing shots required of the taser but don't get me started.
  • 122856122856 Posts: 8
    Hello, it has been a while since I last posted, sometime in July '04.

     

    Tires: I was asking about replacement tires since my Dunlops were then hitting 40,700 miles. I ended up procrastinating until last week with mileage of 47,600. As you can probably guess, those tires were pretty worthless by this time and quite a handful when the road was wet. Anyway, I ended up buying a set of upsized Toyos, 205/50/16. The sales guy at the tire shop sold them to me for the same price as 195's adding that I would appreciate the increased performance and handling. So far I am not disappointed... best part, I can drive in wet weather again without hydroplaning!!!

     

    MPG: I usually pull 26 to 29 mpg with a 50/50 city highway combination. On a recent trip to NY from Central VA, I actually got a trip average of 36. It surprised me, since I was going at a pretty fast clip of 75 mph. Oh, I do have a 5 speed.

     

    Repairs: None to date. Have done oil changes and the 30k checkup. Brakes and pads are still good. Did pick up a chip in the windshield that turned into a full width crack. Had a really noisy sunroof that Whitten Brothers Mazda took care of under warranty.

     

    Verdict: Ultra reliable, still a blast to drive (especially with new tires), still feels tight without rattles, control operation and seat surfaces still look great (easily scratched plastic door sills and hatch area however) and still an attractive design. I had the car new since June of 2001. Funny thing though, I took a double take when I first saw the Kia Spectra5. Even my son mistook it for a P5!

     

    Thanks for reading my ramblings.
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    ...but you probably want to stop by Driving for Dummies -- Writing the Curriculum and add some courses :)

     

    kcram

    Host - Wagons
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:

    “. . .for some numbers quoted by kauai (where are you?). . .”

     

    Resting quietly. Those epic posts of mine take a lot out of me, you know. Thanks for asking, my friend. :-)

     

    You wrote:

    “Speaking of which I don't see enough people gliding to a stop instead of white knuckling each light. Why are we racing to the next block when we know we won't make the light?”

     

    Uh-oh! Excellent observation, and oh-so-right!

     

    Oh boy. You&#146;ve touched something here. Now you got me fired up, and here we go again. . . <laughing!>

     

    (A wave and a tip-o&#146;-the-hat to The Glider. ;-)

     

    This is one of the most egregious &#147;errors&#148; I observe in my fellow motorists. I suspect it is the principal cause of excessive wear on most folks&#146; cars. This behavior is not illegal or unsafe or &#147;wrong,&#148; in any moral sense . . . but it sure is CRAZY. ;-)

     

    I dislike buying used cars (and haven&#146;t bought one in over 30 years, and probably never will again), and this is one of the principal reasons why. This manner of driving is abusive to the machinery; it wears everything out unreasonably, unnecessarily, and prematurely. Most folks&#146; cars are used up, clapped-out junk, despite how they may look on the outside. They are, that is, compared to ours.

     

    On the rare occasion when I&#146;ve driven someone else&#146;s car, I&#146;ve invariably noticed that the whole car seems &#147;loose&#148; and sloppy and, well, worn out. It feels like I imagine ours might feel at way more than 100K miles. But when I look at their odometer, it reads little more than 20K miles. I just shake my head quietly in amazement, wondering how on earth this thing could feel so beaten up and used up so early in its life.

     

    The answer&#146;s simple, of course. The owner just drives it like everyone else drives their cars, and they just are all blissfully unaware of the long-term consequences of their driving habits. I think of it as a form of benign neglect/abuse. These folks just don&#146;t think about it. They don&#146;t mean to kill their cars so early in the car&#146;s life, but that&#146;s what they&#146;re doing. They destroy their cars in one drag race after another, from here to there, again and again and again and again, day in and day out, year in and year out. It&#146;s unbelievable.

     

    They sure do love to buy our used cars. I think over the past decades, and I recall there was ONE potential buyer who looked at my used car, drove it, and failed to buy it. Apart from that one college kid (who wanted a bargain more than a good car), I have always sold my cars to the FIRST one to see and drive them. People are simply amazed at how our used cars drive with anything from 40-60K miles on them. It is difficult to discern any difference from the driving experience between our 60K-mile-old used Civic Si, say, and a brand new one. I mean that literally, as impossible as most of my readers here may find that to believe. Buyers of my used cars could confirm it.

     

    People can&#146;t believe their good luck finding a car like ours. And they buy it! If you want a used car. . . you want ours. Neither is for sale now, though. (&#146;02 Si and &#146;02 P5)

     

    But, back to the way people drive on their daily commutes. . .

     

    The &#147;pack,&#148; as I call it, tend to treat the segment of road between this light and the next. . . as a drag race. The &#147;winner&#148; is the one who first makes it down to the next light. These folks have a tendency to treat their throttles like a switch: ON or OFF. ;-)

     

    Every so often, I&#146;ll try to keep pace with the others starting from a stop at a traffic light. Invariably, I find that full throttle is necessary or I&#146;ll fall behind! Geeze!

     

    As the pack hurtles down towards the next light, they can see it go &#147;yellow&#148; a good 200 yards out, but do they lift? Noooo. . . are you kidding? These people are in a hurry, you know. No, they press on regardless, apparently now determined to demonstrate that they can brake as late as the next guy! They&#146;re in a hurry, you know, and somehow(?) they think this is helpful.

     

    (I don&#146;t know WHY, either, Autonomous. It may be the &#147;Lemming Instinct.&#148; I don&#146;t know. It&#146;s passing strange, isn&#146;t it? ;-)

     

    My guess is that this frantic rush creates the internal impression that they&#146;re going to reach their destinations sooner. They&#146;re hurrying, after all, with lots of throttle and lots of brake. They&#146;re going to get &#147;there&#148; sooner. It must be so.

     

    It&#146;s hysterically funny, to me anyway, as I watch them go at it from the back of the pack. It&#146;s also a bit worrying and somewhat disturbing about what it reveals about my fellow man.

     

    I&#146;m the guy way back, falling away from the group.

     

    I&#146;m also the guy, given an open lane, who suddenly assumes the lead, too. While they&#146;re all stopped dead at the light, I cruise on by at 30 mph, or so, having timed my arrival at the light properly. . . and, most important of all, never once having touched my brakes.

     

    The brakes business is a little game I play with myself in traffic. My objective is to get from &#147;Beginning A&#148; to &#147;Destination B&#148;. . . without ever touching my brakes, not once if possible, save for stopping at the end. Now, sometimes that&#146;s impossible -- STOP signs, for instance. Nevertheless, you&#146;d be surprised at how often I can come very close, and even achieve it at times.

     

    I&#146;ve driven through San Francisco in moderate traffic and never once touched my brakes, from the top of some big hill overlooking The City, to well down into the downtown area.

     

    I&#146;ve driven across metro Milwaukee for a good 10-15 miles in 5 o&#146;clock urban rush hour traffic. . . and never touched my brakes.

     

    I accomplish this by looking ahead, anticipating, and adjusting my speed accordingly. I flow smoothly down the road with very little speed change. Timing is important. I don&#146;t accelerate hard and rarely brake. I rarely need to come to a stop at lights. I ease on down into lights, braking early and gently, if absolutely necessary, focused on maintaining a steady flow along the road, MINIMIZING acceleration and braking. I rarely need to come to a full stop at lights even when I am forced to brake. I use my attention, my anticipation, and my judgment more. . . and my brakes less.

     

    This has the salutary effect of minimizing my contact with the pack, too. I&#146;m safer that way, and less likely to become involved in some other guy&#146;s mistake. (One of my top &#147;Rules to Live By&#148;: Do not get involved in the other guy&#146;s mistake.)

     

    Try it, my friends, . . . it&#146;s harder than it might seem. And, who knows(?), you might like it, too. ;-)

     

    The wear and tear on my car is trivial in consequence, especially compared to the others around me who accelerate HARD away from each stop, lift at the last moment for the next light, and brake HARD to that stopping point. (Autonomous, you suggest it&#146;s &#147;white knuckle&#148; stuff, but I&#146;d differ with you there. These people do this all day, every day. I suggest that they are very &#147;relaxed&#148; as they thoughtlessly beat the <bleep!> out of their machines.)
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    As IAMZ notes:

    &#147;It not only saves fuel, but extends the life of one's brake pads considerably.&#148;

     

    Yes, indeed.

     

    But it&#146;s more than that. Hard acceleration puts stress and wear and tear on the complete drive train and tires. Hard braking at the &#147;other end&#148; of this mini-drag race puts inordinate wear on the tires, the brake pads, disks, shocks, CV joints, driveshafts, transmission, and so on.

     

    It&#146;s not much wear over a short stretch, and yes, cars are made to be able to handle this. But it is wear, all the same, and a whole lot MORE wear than I&#146;m putting on MY machine, traversing the very same stretch of road, but taking a different approach, so to speak. Cars wear out over time, and MORE so with each little mini drag race. And when drivers make a thoughtless habit of engaging in this practice from one stop to the next, time after time, endlessly on each and every daily trip, day-in-and-day-out, endlessly, well. . . their cars wear out at a vastly faster rate than mine.

     

    Some would say I drive like &#147;a little old lady.&#148;

     

    This is untrue.

     

    The little old ladies kick my butt at every light, every time, every last one of &#145;em. It&#146;s a true fact! I&#146;m always a distant last. ;-)

     

    I am always mindful of not being an impediment to the flow of traffic, no matter how silly that flow may be. I do this out of courtesy, thoughtfulness, and because I don&#146;t like everyone being angry with me. I&#146;m not a mobile chicane. That&#146;s no good either. I&#146;m just quiet and unobtrusive as a rule, staying out of everyone&#146;s way, maintaining the pack&#146;s pace only when necessary.

     

    The frenetic pace and attitude of most drivers surely doesn&#146;t help with the many other stresses we face in this life, many of which are unavoidable. Lots of driving stress can be minimized and even avoided, both personal and wear-and-tear on the car, too. Especially on the car!

     

    I get to my urban destination within, say, one or two minutes of everyone else. My trip is very boring, very relaxing, easy on me, and EXTREMELY easy on my machine.

     

    I just ease on down the road . . . at the back of the pack. I have no interest in struggling for ascendancy in the &#147;pack,&#148; in any sense of the term. (Moreover, if you&#146;re quick enough to stay with me on the twisty bits out in the country -- very few are -- I&#146;ll happily give you a respectful nod, and an appreciative wave of acknowledgement, reckoning that you&#146;re a good driver, too. That&#146;s my way. :-)

     

    In the past 20+ years, we have never once had so much as a $100 repair on any car we&#146;ve owned. Not once. Basically, we don&#146;t have repairs outside of initial warranty issues, and even those are very rare. Our automobile costs are confined to routine maintenance consisting of oil and filter changes, and occasionally we need new tires, which are consumables. I think it&#146;s fair to say that the way we drive has much to do with this.

     

    Thus endeth today&#146;s sermon.

     

    Go in peace, my friends, preferably with less throttle and even less brake. ;-)

     

    -Kauai (who picks his places to go fast)

     

    "I have made this letter longer than usual, only because I have not

    had the time to make it shorter." -Blaise Pascal, French philosopher,

    1623-1662
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    I broke up my post into two segments out of necessity, not desire. The system repeatedly refused to accept my long post, truncating it, forcing me to break it into two parts... or abandon it.

     

    You wouldn't like to see such a valuable post abandoned, now would you? ;-)

     

    We had this problem before.

     

    Any chance those IT folks can correct it again, like they did the last time?

     

    Thanks.

     

    -Kauai (your humble Beta Tester)
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:

    "The #1 lane should be used only for passing. Anyone in that lane who's holding up traffic would be cited, then tasered."

     

    NOW we're talkin'! :-)

     

    Any chance we could just give him a little zap first, though, and then discuss the ticket and the major zap?
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:

    "I ended up buying a set of upsized Toyos..."

     

    Toyos have an excellent reputation. Which tire did you get?

     

    You wrote:

    "I can drive in wet weather again without hydroplaning!!!"

     

    No kidding! Basically, I don't like hydroplanning -- it scares me at speed. I don't like being out of control. I'm a Control Freak! Any number of people will be glad to confirm that! ;-)

     

    You wrote:

    "I took a double take when I first saw the Kia Spectra5. Even my son mistook it for a P5!"

     

    You, too?! I saw a photo of that Kia in a recent Autoweek magazine and said the very same thing!

     

    You wrote:

    "Thanks for reading my ramblings."

     

    The very best kind of reading, my friend.

     

    Thank _you_. :-)

     

    -Kauai
  • mdaffronmdaffron Posts: 4,421
    Lee ... I noticed from your profile that you live in Richmond. I do too. I drive a 2000 Protege ES and my wife drives a 2002 Protege5, both of which we bought from Whitten Mazda over on Midlothian Turnpike. I've been a very satisfied Whitten customer since 1991 and have owned two 1992 Proteges and a B2300 pickup from that dealership too. We should hook up!

     

    Meade
  • 122856122856 Posts: 8
    Hello again:

     

    Tires: The Toyos I ended up putting on the car were the Proxess (sp?) 4 series. A really nice agressive tread, well grooved (siping?) all season radial, decent wear rating and well priced (relatively speaking). Another tire installer I talked to, who shall remain nameless, was going to install lesser Toyos. Luckily, I checked on the series and realized that they were summer rated tires only... that was why his price was good. Richmond had a lot of rain today and the new tires handled very well in the wet. With the old worn Dunlops, I knew (stupidly) how dangerous they were when I accelerated onto wet I-95 only to have the front tires lose grip. The rpm's were increasing without any forward movement. Pretty scary too.

     

    Whitten Brothers: This is my first Mazda, previous cars were Hondas, Nissans and Subarus. I've had this car since July '01, almost 4 years old this summer and I have to say that I am really impressed with the build quality. I would not hesitate a second to buy another Mazda (and from Whitten Brothers too! Great Service team, especially Mike Z.) I like the new 3's, but the 6 hatch has my interest piqued. The 6 wagon is nice, but the lines of the hatchback are more attractive to my design sense. Of course I want the Rx8 too. What, too many toys and not enough time?

     

    Meade: Yes I live in Richmond, VA too. Interesting place to live and work. Would be great to get together and swap car stories.

     

    Thanks everyone, this is a great forum.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Great to see you back, kauai. As eloquent as ever!

     

    I'm signing up for your driving school.

     

    Your profile says "AL, United States ..." but you talk of San Francisco as if it's home. Now, SF would be an interesting daily drive. Visions of Steve McQueen strapped into a MazdaSpeed 6 come to mind. In Halifax, Nova Scotia, another port city, the downtown driving feels sometimes like a 45 degree ascent/descent. It was a rental from Halifax to Anigonish that convinced me to buy a Protege. That peppy car against the rolling scenery made me feel as if I was in a zoom-zoom commercial. Meanwhile, here in the nation's capital (Ottawa) we just have humdrum elevations so the Pro just zips along.

     

    p.s. keep those killer quotes coming
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    "Tires: The Toyos I ended up putting on the car were the Proxess (sp?) 4 series" ... Another tire installer I talked to, who shall remain nameless, was going to install lesser Toyos. Luckily, I checked on the series and realized that they were summer rated tires only... that was why his price was good. Richmond had a lot of rain today and the new tires handled very well in the wet. "

     

    I am also considering Toyos later this year. In my neck of the woods there are several Toyo models in the 205/50/16 size including: Proxes 4, Proxes FZ4, and Proxes TPT.

     

    Their warranties seem slightly different: the 4 states simply that it is warranted against "manufacturers defects and materials" the FZ4 says "5 year workmanship warranty" and the TPT says "100,000 mile limited treadwear" and "5 year workmanship warranty".

     

    In terms of price the FZ4 is the cheapest by about 15%; the others are similar in price.

     

    Were the FZ4 the "lesser" Toyos you rejected?

     

    Is anyone aware of the differences between these three different models? Any long term testimonials for the TPT?

     

    p.s. My brother has been satisfied with the Toyos on his Camry.
  • 122856122856 Posts: 8
    Hello Autonomous:

    I kind of selected the Proxes 4 almost by default. Looking at the internet, there were not too many choices, mostly Toyos, Kumhos, Dunlops, and Goodyear in the 195 series. I considered ordering by mail, but after shipping and finding someone to remove, mount, add valves, balance, align and dispose, it was just about the same price to get it done locally. The other tire I considered was a Kumho Ecsta 711 series I think. I had specifically requested an all season radial and was surprised under closer examination that it was a summer tire only. Glad I checked however. The tire shop that carried the Toyos recommended keeping similar performance rated tires as the Dunlop SP5000's. He also had the FZ4's but they were more expensive aat his shop, and I kind of sorta was trying hard to keep a budget of under 500 dollars. It had been a while since I purchased four tires and to me they seemed quite high, but the low profile ultra performance V rated tires are pricey. Oh well. They do handle very well. I was not aware of the differences in the warranty!!!?!?
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    122856 wrote:

    &#147;The Toyos I ended up putting on the car were the Proxess (sp?) 4 series.&#148;

     

    It&#146;s a pity Tire Rack does not carry the Toyo line. I really like shopping with Tire Rack, and I&#146;d like to have the Toyos as an additional alternative.

     

    By the way, I don&#146;t know what your experience is, but I once tried driving summer tires on the snow. . . and I&#146;m lucky to still be alive to be talking to you today! It was essentially undriveable. I actually slid right straight through a red light at one point, and it got worse from there.

     

    I&#146;m glad for your sake you noticed the tires were summer only. I&#146;m surprised the seller didn&#146;t emphasize this to you and even refuse to sell you those tires as winter approached.

     

    Those who drive high performance Toyos all speak highly of them.

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;This is my first Mazda, previous cars were Hondas, Nissans and Subarus. I've had this car since July '01, almost 4 years old this summer and I have to say that I am really impressed with the build quality.&#148;

     

    I agree. As much as we have liked our Honda Civics, we like the quality of the Mazda Protégé even better. If one of the Protégé models meets one&#146;s requirements, I don&#146;t think these cars are equaled on today&#146;s market for value and overall quality. In short, I&#146;d take a Mazda 3 over the regular Civic sedan today.

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;I would not hesitate a second to buy another Mazda. . .&#148;

     

    Yep, us, too; we&#146;ve even fancied a discounted Mazda Miata. Some of those can be had for under $20K, which is an amazing bargain in today&#146;s market.

     

    If you&#146;ve never driven the Mazda rotary, I&#146;d encourage you to take a test drive in the new RX-8. I bought an RX-7 in &#146;81, I think it was, and it was a great car. That engine is amazingly smooth.

     

    If you should decide you might like to buy an RX-8, come talk to me. I&#146;ll share some additional thoughts with you in email.

     

    I have always been puzzled at Mazda&#146;s lack of success in the American market. They make excellent cars. They do seem to be doing better these days, now that Ford has, I believe, a controlling interest. Ford knows how to market cars better than the Mazda folks, I think. Mazda seems to be dominated by engineers, as it should be, in my humble opinion. Mazda&#146;s marketing has been poor. It&#146;s the car-buying public who has been losing out here. They&#146;ve been over-looking some fine cars.

     

    I suspect that an even-handed appraisal of the Honda Civic (not the Si, which is a specialty, niche car) vs. the new Mazda 3 would have at least half, if not the majority of buyers, electing to purchase the Mazda.

     

    The main downside in the past has been an uncompetitive resale value, where the Civic shines. But, even if I find I cannot sell my P5 for as much as I might have sold a Civic Si for when the time comes, I&#146;ll reckon the extra &#147;dues&#148; to have been well worth the fun, practicality, and superior quality of my P5. Actually, though, our P5s are something of a rarity here, having only been sold towards the end of their product life in North America. In a few years, they may command a premium on the used car market. They certainly should for the knowledgeable enthusiasts who want what it gives, but cannot afford a new car. Who knows? We&#146;ll see.

     

    However, I think Mazda has a bright future with Ford, and I suspect we may see rising resale values overall for Mazda&#146;s products in the future.

     

    -Kauai

     

    &#147;I am not young enough to know everything."

    -Oscar Wilde
  • kauai215kauai215 Posts: 190
    You wrote:

    &#147;Great to see you back, kauai.&#148;

     

    Thanks. :-)

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;I'm signing up for your driving school.&#148;

     

    Cool! You may be the only student, but think of all the extra attention you&#146;ll get! ;-)

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;Your profile says "AL, United States ..." but you talk of San Francisco as if it's home.&#148;

     

    I was just visiting San Francisco. Nice place if it suits you, but too many people, too crowded for my taste, and the traffic congestion was awful. It was a dramatic change from the Midwest where I live in Wisconsin. I think the Edmunds profiles were altered when they changed the software recently, and my profile was reset to the default value of AL.

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;Now, SF would be an interesting daily drive.&#148;

     

    From my limited experience, I&#146;d say any drive is likely to be a protracted drive . . . in stop-and-go traffic. Your initial interest might soon be replaced by something less happy. Lots of folks love it out there, though, and they&#146;re happy with their choice. It&#146;s just not for me is all.

     

    You wrote:

    &#147;p.s. keep those killer quotes coming&#148;

     

    Ah, you liked the Pascal quote? I&#146;m glad. :-)

     

    Here&#146;s another for you that I&#146;ve always liked from Denise McCluggage, a superb columnist who writes for Autoweek magazine. Denise is an ex-racing driver, and in my youth I was privileged to see her race at a number of venues in Europe. Very few women competed in major motorsports back then, not unlike today, too, I guess. Denise was good, too, and she beat a whole lot of men.

     

    Denise has a way with words that I have enormous respect for. Here she is speaking of the problem of trying to get our nation&#146;s youth to wear safety belts and she describes their attitude, as they seem to think themselves to be:

     

    &#147;. . . invulnerable -- somehow cosmically beyond the jurisdiction of chance and jeopardy.&#148;

     

    Isn&#146;t that wonderful? Does this not strike straight to the heart of the problem? I only wish I could write like that. :-)

     

    -Kauai (who feels nervous and naked without a safety belt on.)

     

    &#147;Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long.&#148;

    -Ogden Nash, US humorist & poet (1902 - 1971)
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    "I kind of selected the Proxes 4 almost by default. Looking at the internet, there were not too many choices, mostly Toyos, Kumhos, Dunlops, and Goodyear in the 195 series. I considered ordering by mail, but ... it was just about the same price to get it done locally.

    I suspected as much.

     

    My Internet source in Canada, Tiretrends.com, offers some interesting choices but is by no means exhaustive. For the P5 they include Yokohamas and Falkens. Judging by posts from other Protege owners the Toyos seem to be a popular alternative to the pricier Dunlop 5000s, the Falkens sound like they have noise and wear issues and the Kumhos seem attractive but are not as well known.

     

    Tiretrends.com warranty information may not be complete so I would double check with your seller.

     

    Did you opt for a national chain or a local independent tire seller? After some hunting, my winter tires were purchased at an independent thinking that I was supporting the local economy. But these days one wonders what is local, national and international.

     

    It would be good to hear a short and long term update on your Toyos. Also anyone else's experiences with their tires would be much appreciated.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    "from Denise McCluggage, a superb columnist who writes for Autoweek magazine. Denise is an ex-racing driver ... speaking of the problem of trying to get our nation&#146;s youth to wear safety belts . . . invulnerable -- somehow cosmically beyond the jurisdiction of chance and jeopardy.&#148;

     

    Sums it up beautifully, kauai. Unfortunately the statement is incomplete: not only does it apply to drivers other than youth but this is likely a global phenomenon.

     

    The paradox: as the machines become more refined, our driving becomes more crude by ignoring safety and courtesy. The F1 races (returning in March!) are a mix of skill, endurance, daring, and chance; too many drivers rely on the last two only.

     

    (Exit stage right)
  • isseyvooisseyvoo Posts: 121
    10,000 mi and counting on Toyo TPTs. Quite pleased (except for the initial price! Ouch!)
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Thanks Isseyvoo. Any comments about noise and handling as compared to the stock Dunlop 5000s?
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    Kauai, I'll check on the long post limit for ya :)

     

    kcram

    Host - Wagons
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