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Ford Fusion/Mercury Milan: Warranty/Extended Warranty

24

Comments

  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Note Ford qualifies their unique warranty by saying they are the only "full-line" manufacturer to offer this kind of warranty.

    Yeah, I had to laugh when I read that.

    The power train warranty is a nice extra. Giving a longer warranty is typically something that has been done when buyers do not trust the product...eg. Hyundai and before that it was Chyrsler with the 7 yr/70,000 mile power train warranty.

    I would like it if there were an option for fewer miles and more years on all these warranties, though. Since I only drive maybe 8000 miles per year, 5 years is only be about 40,000 miles for me.

    Is it just coincidence that mazda is changing from their 4 year bumper-to-bumper warranty to this same warranty structure?
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,442
    we live by the code. the only problem is that after you own a few, you can get confused as to the current code. then call your wife/husband/whatever, as long as you didn't lock the phone in there too. ;)
  • johnclineiijohnclineii Posts: 2,287
    So change the secondary code of all the vehicles you own to be the same...that is if you trust the wife/kids/dog, etc.!

    I still think Ford erred in not including the doorpad on Fusion/Milan.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,442
    from what i remember, you can only add digits to the code.
    ford does sell an add on keypad.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,621
    Hyundai at or near the bottom of quality compared to Ford? ROFL.

    Gee - hard to tell you own a Hyundai.

    I did qualify that with "not so much lately". Hyundai quality is much improved (nowhere else they could go but up). But the fact remains that Ford is above average in long term dependability and Hyundai is below average. Kia, Suzuki and Mitsubishi are at or near the bottom. See for yourself.

    image
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,556
    I wouldn't put to much stock in those figures. It just says problems per vehicle, doesn't say what those problems are. A model with one problem per vehicle is worse than one with two problems per vehicle if that one problem is the engine exploding verses a couple of knobs falling off.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,621
    So point us to a reliability rating system that takes that into account. JD Power is THE industry standard.

    I bet if the same survey showed Hyundai above Ford you'd be singing a different tune.

    Not hard to tell who the Hyundai owners are in this forum.
  • ron_mron_m Posts: 188
    Based upon the dependability results displayed on this particular chart, I sure would hate to think that I had went out and dropped a huge amount of cash on an Audi, Mercedes-Benz, or Land Rover product! :) Also, I was pleased to see that Ford came in above the industry average.

    Regarding the increased powertrain warranty duration that Ford is now offering, there is absolutely no doubt that this is a step in the right direction for improving their North American sales.

    Ron M.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,556
    So point us to a reliability rating system that takes that into account.

    I don't know of one that does. But that doesn't diminish what I said.

    I bet if the same survey showed Hyundai above Ford you'd be singing a different tune.

    If you do make that bet don't put your rent money on it because you would lose. But that doesn't diminish what I said.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    CR's annual study is weighted by type of problem. Take a look at the scores for Fords vs. Hyundais in their 2006 survey and tell us what you see--which brand scores better overall?

    Also, 18th from the bottom is a long ways from "at or near the bottom." And a difference of 231 to 250 is hardly a big difference. Kia, Land Rover, Mini... they have some catching up to do. They are "at or near the bottom." Hyundai is not.

    Not hard to tell who the Ford owners are in this forum. ;)

    P.S. As long as JD Power is "the industry standard", you probably noticed how Ford fared in their latest IQS, vs. the likes of Hyundai. But since that survey shows Hyundai above Ford (which was below average), perhaps you will sing a different tune?

    http://www.jdpower.com/corporate/news/releases/pressrelease.asp?ID=2006082
  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    JD Power is the industry standard!!!??? YOu have got to be kidding. Their longterm reliability is based on 3 years of ownership. Hardly long term. No survey (not even CR) is the industry standard. They all have flaws and should only be used as a tool.

    Ford needed this warranty to help sell cars. Sales are down and they need to restore consumer confidence in their vehicles. The Fusion is a nice vehicle, very competitive with the top selling cars (take note GM). It will need this boost to compete with the Camry and Accord. These are formidable cars, great sales, resale value and history of reliabilty (or at least you know you won't be upside down after 2 years). With the warranty, it gives folks a reason to give Ford a chance. The problem with marketing tools like this is if quality is still not up to par, what do you do for an encore?
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,621
    This particular JD Power study was 5 yrs, not 3. The JD Power survey is much more statistically accurate than CR. CR only surveys subscribers, not a random sample of owners, and they don't publish actual numbers of problems - only circles.

    Granted it doesn't tell you which ones are more costly to repair but it does tell you how many problems occurred which is important.

    And the newer Ford vehicles like the Mustang, 500 and Fusion are even better than the 5 yr old models used for the Power survey.

    I'm not bashing Hyundai - they're a solid player with solid products. But they're not better than Ford - yet.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,621
    IQS is meaningless IMO (and that's without looking at who ranks where - doesn't matter). If we only owned cars for 90 days I guess it would be pertinent. Would you rather have 3 problems in the first 90 days and no more for 5 years or have 0 in the first 90 days and 10 more over the next 5 years?

    IQS is important to the mfrs because a bad rating means you might be pissing off new customers or you either have a dealer problem or assembly issue that needs to be addressed. But consumers should be looking at 3-5 yr ratings.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,556
    I'm not bashing Hyundai - they're a solid player with solid products. But they're not better than Ford - yet.

    I have owned Fords and I have owned Hyundais, with the possible exception of the Mustang I will stick with Hyundai.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    I disagree that the IQS is "meaningless". In my experience with many new cars, most problems surfaced in the first 90 days. Thus I find the IQS useful, if not the complete picture. I like to know about things like dealer issues, design issues (captured by the IQS), and assembly issues.

    BTW, the VDS covers three years, as noted in the report's press release:

    The study, which measures problems experienced by original owners of 3-year-old (2002 model-year) vehicles, provides useful information to both consumers and the automotive industry on long-term vehicle quality.

    http://www.jdpower.com/corporate/news/releases/pressrelease.asp?ID=2005089

    It will be interesting to see what the IQS score of the Fusion/Milan is. I doubt the 2006 study included them, or many of them. Also, a new VDS should be out any day now; the last one was released in June 2005. But that one may not include any Fulans yet; it will probably cover 2003-05 vehicles.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,556
    I also have issues with CR don't trust it one bit for reasons I won't get into now. But another question on IQS is how much more likely is someone going to report a minor problem if they own a $85k Land Rover over a $17K Ford?

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    I don't know. They don't seem to have any trouble reporting issues with $15k Kias and $20k Minis! ;)
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,621
    Sorry - that study was 3 yrs so it was looking at 2002 model year vehicles. They used to do a 5 yr study.

    Based on the lack of problems being reported on the Mustang, 500/Montego/Freestyle and Fusion/Milan/Zephyr I think Ford will be moving up the charts over the next several years.

    Let's face it - unless you're at the very top or the very bottom there's not a huge difference. The worst cars today are better than the best cars 20 yrs ago.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,556
    No they don't but when you buy a $85K car you tend to notice and/or complain about more mundane things. There might be something that an owner of a 15K kia might not notice that a owner of a $85K Rover would complain about.

    You spend $85K for a car you expect it to be perfect.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    Lexus owners don't seem to have that problem. Let's face it, based on the JD Power survey some luxury makes like Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz seem to have some problems. But now back to our regularly-scheduled topic...
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