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BMW 3-Series Tires and Wheels

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Comments

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,283
    Was wondering if they were trying to avoid doing work that is covered by my extended maintenance plan. Can NOT find minimum rotor specs any where!

    I wouldn't sweat it- especially if you aren't going to track the car. In my experience most 3 and 5 Series BMWs will only need new rotors every other pad change. That's been the case since the first E3s back in the '60s. The M cars and SUVs are another matter.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • gogonowgogonow Posts: 5
    Good point roadburner! Driving on the winding and hilly roads here is fun but no track time for this car. THANKS!
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,283
    No problem, just glad to help. Enjoy your 3er!

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • rmossrmoss Posts: 23
    I had the same issue yesterday with my rear brakes. Min spec is 18.4 mm, mine were at 19.3 mm. Dealer did not replace them.
  • I bought a 335 coupe with the 19" tires and sport package. I know people have a lot of issues with the 18' wheels, but the 19"s seem to have different ratings from Tire Rack. The only RFT replacement for them are Pirellis (which cost more and are consumer rated lower)). So I am wondering if the 19" Bridgestones wear as quickly as the 18"s and if anyone can recommend better rubber for me down the road?

    Thanks
  • gogonowgogonow Posts: 5
    not sure if GENERAL makes a tire for you but...the ones we put on our 330ci (sports package)...ARE AWESOME! great cornering, etc....just bought some GENREALSfor our Mercedes 430.....replaced OEM Michelins on both.....Great price and terrific feel and low noise....for a convertible!.....good luck
  • I was talking to a ex BMW service rep and he told me that you had to replace your wheels in order to move to tires other than run flats. Is that true? I've heard troubling stories about RFTs (I have an 07 328i with 15k miles on it) and I'm thinking the RFTs may be a real liability... especially if I have to replace the wheels!!! :cry:
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    No, it isn't even remotely true that you need to replace the wheels. If you feel like putting the poor ignorant soul on the spot, ask him or her to put it into writing, and then when he/she does, inform them that you're sending it to BMW. :)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • Thanks Shipo - didn't make sense to me... is there a good all-round replacement? I live in Texas and really don't drive my vundercar hard at all but do want a tire that will do it justice and get more miles than 20k... thanks for you quick response!
    :D
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Geez, lots of options there. I'd personally go with either a Michelin or a Yokohama performance all-season tire. That said, there are lots and lots of folks who would chose Pirelli, Sumotomo, Toyo, Falken, Goodyear, General...

    Go to TireRack.com and look up your car and then play with the filters to see a significant number of tires that will fit. ;-)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • idoc2idoc2 Posts: 78
    Wow was I shocked. My 2007 328xi with all-weather RFTs was in the shop to replace faulty O2 sensors and the dealer lent me an 2007 328xi coupe with sport package and high performance tires. I live in New England and my car usually does very well in the snow. The ride home in the loaner coupe on dry pavement was terrific but overnight we received 3 inches of snow. The ride to work that morning was scary. The tires which had plenty of tread were terrible in the snow. Needless to say stopping distances were awful and despite the AWD the car floated from side to side going down poorly plowed roads at a cautious 25 to 30MPH. Even a small hill was a challenge. I was amazed that even with AWD just how bad performance tires really are in snow.

    IDOC
  • Yeah,

    I drove through the snow this morning on Mass Pike too. My 2006 330xi which I bought last month has replacement tires. The drive was NOT fun. All wheel drive, my as*.

    I had more comfort riding in snow on my 97 Honda Prelude with year old performance tires from Tire rack. And Prelude is a front wheel drive, not all wheel.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    It has been said here many times that AWD, while offering good acceleration in slippery conditions, is no substitute for equipping a car with proper tires. While I might agree that an AWD equipped BMW with all-season rubber will make a passable winter time driver, short of living up in the mountains, I would MUCH prefer to drive a properly shod (i.e. with winter tires) RWD BMW during the winter months. That said, if I did in fact live up in them-thar-hills, I'd probably opt for AWD and winter rubber.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • idoc2idoc2 Posts: 78
    "While I might agree that an AWD equipped BMW with all-season rubber will make a passable winter time driver..."

    I live in a hilly part of CT where we get plenty of snowy/icy days. I also frequent the Green Mountains of VT to ski; Stratton and Okemo this weekend :). My 328xi with all-season Conti RFTs (now with 38K miles) is more than "passable" under winter conditions, its very good. It is far better than was my FWD Maxima with 4 snow tires. I'm sure that my 328xi with snow tires x 4 would be best of all but the down sides of expense, inconvenience of switching twice per year and a noisy rough ride make them undesirable. Based on my actual recent experience where I do agree with you is that performance tires, even on AWD, are awful!

    IDOC
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "My 328xi with all-season Conti RFTs (now with 38K miles) is more than "passable" under winter conditions, its very good. It is far better than was my FWD Maxima with 4 snow tires."

    While that may well be, I'd bet that a 328i with four winter tires would perform as well as or better than your all-season shod 328xi when in the white stuff in every driving metric except acceleration.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • idoc2idoc2 Posts: 78
    Why? Have you actually driven both or is this theoretical? As I said my FWD Maxima with snows x 4 was definitely not as good as my 328xi with all-season rubber especially when it comes to traction. To be specific there are several hills with stop lights at which in wintery conditions my Maxima would really struggle and the 328xi has absolutely no problem. So why would a RWD BMW with snows do better?? Frankly, I doubt it would. But I suppose this example of better traction equates to better acceleration. Additionally, you alluded to lateral acceleration when you said "every driving metric except acceleration" but honestly here I detect no advantage either way. Perhaps this in a small sense is apples to oranges but the Maxima with snows and the AWD BMW with all-seasons seem to handle twisties (and stopping) about the same. Admittedly, I try not to test the limits to avoid as Lynyrd Skynyrd said :"...oak tree your in my way." ;)
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,283
    While that may well be, I'd bet that a 328i with four winter tires would perform as well as or better than your all-season shod 328xi when in the white stuff in every driving metric except acceleration.


    Agreed!

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "Why? Have you actually driven both or is this theoretical?"

    Those two particular cars? No.

    That said, back when I worked for MB-USA, I was afforded the opportunity to drive an All-Season shod AWD and Winter tire equipped RWD version of the E-Class in a controlled environment (i.e on a track) in wintery conditions. Apart from the theoretical logic of the RWD performing better in turns and in braking due to it weighing less, having better Front-to-Rear weight balance, and having tires with more grip both laterally and linearly; the drives on the track handsomely underscore the true apples to apples difference.

    As I said before, the AWD car with all season tires did in fact accelerate better (and by extension climb steep hills better), however, in the braking department, the winter tire shod RWD car stopped in a significantly shorter distance from any given speed (like forty feet shorter from 50 mph). That leaves turning; this is an area that showed mixed results with the RWD car handily besting the AWD car in all but the off-camber turn test (where the AWD was the victor by a narrow margin).

    In addition, there was test between two versions of the E-Class and two versions of the Audi A6 that was published by Car & Driver a few years ago that quantifies what I've written with hard facts. If you're interested you might want to take a peek in their archives for the article.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • I just like to add, that AWD is not a requirement for Winter Driving. So why do so many people that live in the snow belt, want to pay the extra almost 2 grand ... many disadvantages like increased weight, decreased gas mileage, more noise, less balance, and less reliability. Is it really worth it? I frankly think AWD is oversold to the public, not just in BMW, but by many manufacturers. Forget most all season tires as useful in the winter, gets some snows and go light on the accelerator. I see more people in awd, fwd, and rwd drive cars just spinning their tires in the snow like they were testing on a dynamo. Maybe America should wean themselves off AWD as it has SUV's to save on gas. I'm obviously not a big fan off all these cross over AWD vehicles either, heavier and a little higher than cars of equal interior and luggage volume. The cross over awd vehicles are huge compromises, they just don't do anything really well.
  • idoc2idoc2 Posts: 78
    Very interesting and I'm sure all true. Nevertheless, in the real world of day to day driving, not on a test track but in the hills of New England, given my needs to climb steep driveways and other assorted hills the tremendous traction advantage of AWD even with all-season rubber out ways all the "measurable" (but of dubious real world value) advantages of RWD with snow tires. Perhaps if I lived in the flat land of say wintery Chicago I would opt for RWD with snow tires. But you see I must get up those hills and driveways which was often hard with even FWD and snow tires. Since one must prioritize, as a trade-off I am willing to drive slower than perhaps I could with a RWD or FWD vehicle equipped with snows tires for the advantage that is most important to me: linear traction. ;)
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