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Toyota Camry Timing Belt/Chain Questions

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  • wenkerkkwenkerkk Posts: 1
    i have a 93 toyota camry i didnt have any problems with it now since ive gotten the timing belt put on it has a problem with starting up the so call mechanic who did the job said i needed a ignition coil now i also had a major tune-up done after the timing belt does anyone know out there could this really be the problem or did the mechanic do the timing right? please help its causing me too much money!
  • hjazim13hjazim13 Posts: 1
    Dear collogues:
    You must differentiate between “Drive Belts, Timing Belts & Timing Chain.
    As each one of them means different thing
    As follows:

    1- Drive Belts are the external forward belts those drive the FWD accessories like generator, cooling fans, air-condition compressor, etc.
    2- Timing Belts same as Timing Chain except they are made from Serpentine rubber Belts.
    3- Timing Chain same as Timing Belts except they are made from durable metals.
    4- Both Timing Chain & Timing Belts work internally.
    5- So your car either has Timing Chain or Timing Belts.
    6- DON’T confuse your self between Timing Chain & Timing Belts.
    7- Timing Chain last very long time as long as you replace your oil
    regularly at least every 5000 KMs.

    Best Regards.
    HjaziM13
  • I have a 93 Camry V6 and it has a start-up of about 3-5 sec., cold. I read a post about the idle valve could be dirty. Also I notice one of the sensor at the coolant outlet by the throttle will make start up difficult if I disconnect it. I think it sends a signal to the cold start injector.This sensor makes it idle too fast too long after start-up.Maybe for for about 5min with outside temp 40-60 degrees on my Camry.I hope to change it soon and see the start-up time change to 1-2 sec.

    On timing issues, the car would run rough if not done correctly. Correctly, being out of time. I doubt that, but these cars don't really have any tune-up items. I would think a new set of plug wires and some plugs, and cleaning of the throttle plate with alcohol. That's my major tune up.
  • hvtec2002hvtec2002 Posts: 19
    I replaced the timing belt on my civic 01 when it was 107000 kms and replaced the new engine when it was 176000 kms because all the rod bearing and main bearing were bad.

    How long will the timing chain last on these new camry and what will be the cost to replace them?
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,667
    A long, long time - 150-200K miles easily if the oil is changed regularly.
  • bookman3bookman3 Posts: 1
    selling my car never got belt (chain?) replace 142k -what should it cost to get this done - car works fine - should I avoid issue of getting it done?
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    do you have the I-4 cylinder, or the V- 6 cylinder?
  • At 86,000 miles I had the timing belt replaced on my 2001 Camry V6, as part of general maintenance. The invoice noted that timing belt tensioner bolt froze, and needed to be removed to replace the timing belt, The technician noted "can't heat bolt, so cut bolt, drilled out bolt, retap threads and installed new bolts."

    After driving the car for 2600 miles, it died and had to be towed to the dealership that did the original job. They said they found a "failed crank sensor" which they replaced. The invoice said the following were also replaced: tensioner assembly for the timing belt, thread insert, and bolt.

    Do you think the original job was not done correctly or is it just a coincidence that what was fixed the second time had do do with the timing belt.

    Thanks in advance for your response.
  • leeyokoleeyoko Posts: 1
    its definitely not a coincident for one you do not cut a bolt because its froze you put penetration oil on it and then put a breaker bar on it and it will brake it loose or it will snap the bolt you really have no way to cut the bolt with the tensioner on. they probably cross threaded it when they where putting it on and then did a sloppy job rethreading it so the bolt didn't hold and the tensioner comes off gets rapped up and takes out the crank sensor I would definitely get a refund they do not know what there doing sue them for the damages there's to many lousy mechanics out there that charge for there own screw ups.
  • kth713kth713 Posts: 1
    I have a 97 camry and was driving friday and heard a noise coming from the engine it sounded like something clanging around inside, after driving a little way it sounded like whatever it was broke. I am assuming it is the timing belt that broke. I pulled over and opened the hood and looked underneath the car and noticed it was leaking fluid. My AAA driver told me it was anti-freeze that was leaking. could a broken timing belt cause the water pump to get damaged? A reply would be greatly appreciated. Oh yea I have 122,000 miles on the car. If I try starting the car it won't start and I get that same noise and it will start to leak anti-freeze.
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    The timing belt is made of rubber; if it breaks, there is no noise -- the engine immediately dies.

    My guess is that the opposite occurred -- the water pump bearing seized, which caused both the leak and the timing belt to break. The latter means the car won't start.
  • Has a timing CHAIN - not a belt. Cool!
  • 2GRFE Engine 2007 camry exhibit this kinds of problems
    * Water Pump Leak
    * Oil leak from VVTI ( variable valve timing intelligent ) pipe ( Bank 1 )
    * Knocking Noise at first start in the morning or when vehicle seated for long time.
    ( this cause by the VVTI gear not locking up )
    * Timing Chain Equipted and its not easy to replaced, You have to remove most of the parts like, oil pan, sub oil pan, water pump, steering pump, drain coolant and oil.
    * VVTI gear replacement ( follow the same procedure of replacing Timing Chain.

    If you notice one of those problems send your vehicle to your nearest dealer for warranty.
  • If you need a reliable source (not a mechanic or dealer) to tell you if your engine is interference vs non-interfernce, look here. This is the website for Gates Belts.

    http://www.gates.com/part_locator/index.cfm?location_id=3598&go=Interference

    1. If you have an interference engine, then when your timing belt breaks it *might/probably* will damage your engine.

    2. If you have an non-interference engine, then when your timing belt breaks, the car will stop propelling forward and will roll to a stop. Your engine will not be damaged from the incident.

    For example, look up a 4 cylinder 1996 Honda Accord (interference). See all the red text warning in the timing belt section of parts? Now look up a 4 cylinder Toyota Camry. Not red text means it is a non-interference engine.
  • karl99karl99 Posts: 3
    Currently I have my cylinder head off of my 1993 Toyota Camry 2.2L. The hardest thing I found was taking off the intake manifold since space to loosing bolts is very limited. I have the head out to get fully re-conditioned. My main concern now is how to torque up the intake manifold bolts once the head is in place. I thought maybe I could install the fuel rail and intake manifold on the cylinder head first then tighten install the cylinder head. Looks like the intake manifold allows enough room to get a torque wrench under in order to torque the cylinder bolts as well as the intake and exhaust cam bolts to spec.
    The injector harness has enough room to go over the manifold once in place also.
    Air pipes and everything else would be bolted on after the head was installed.
    Let me know what you think and if tried this.
    Thanks
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    1. Install cylinder head
    2. Install spark plug tubes
    3. Assemble exhaust camshaft (ie gear spring, sub gear, wave washer, etc)
    4. Install camshafts
    5. Check and adjust valve clearance
    6. Install Semi-circular plugs
    7. Install PCV Valve and High tension cords clamp
    8. Install cylinder head cover
    9. Install Oil Pressure switch
    10. Install Alternator bracket
    11. Install Engine Hangers
    12. Install #3 Timing belt cover
    13. Temporarily install #1 idler pulley and tension spring
    14. Install Camshaft timing pulley and timing belt
    15. Install injectors and delivery pipe
    16. Install intake manifold
    17. Install VSV
    18. Calif only: connect VSV connector
    19. Connect knock sensor and VSV connectors
    20. Install 2 engine wire ground straps to intake manifold
    21/22. Install air tube, Calif/no-california
    23. Connect vacuum hoses
    24. Connect a/c idle-up valve connector for AC
    25. Install EGR valve and vacuum modulator
    26. Install throttle body
    27. Install Water Bypass pipe
    28. Install water outlet
    29. Connect engine wire for O2 sensors to engine hanger
    30. Connect oil pressure switch connector
    31. Assemble exhaust manifold and warm up 3way cat converter
    32. Install exhaust manifold and warm up 3 way assembly
    33. Connect front exhaust pipe
    34. Install distributor
    35. Install Alternator
    36. Install air cleaner cap, resonator and air cleaner hose
    37. A/T: connect and adjust throttle cable
    38. Connect and adjust accelerator cable
    39. Fill w/engine coolant
    40. Connect neg terminal cable to battery
    41. Start engine and check for leaks
    42. Adjust ignition timing
    43. Perform road test
    44. Recheck engine coolant level and oil level.
  • karl99karl99 Posts: 3
    Currently I have my cylinder head off of my 1993 Toyota Camry 2.2L. The hardest thing I found was taking off the intake manifold since space to loosing bolts is very limited. I have the head out to get fully re-conditioned. My main concern now is how to torque up the intake manifold bolts once the head is in place. I thought maybe I could install the fuel rail and intake manifold on the cylinder head first then tighten install the cylinder head. Looks like the intake manifold allows enough room to get a torque wrench under in order to torque the cylinder bolts as well as the intake and exhaust cam bolts to spec.
    The injector harness has enough room to go over the manifold once in place also.
    Air pipes and everything else would be bolted on after the head was installed.
    Let me know what you think and if tried this.
    Thanks
  • karl99karl99 Posts: 3
    Just finished up installing my cylinder head and intake manifold as well as fuel rail on my 1993 Toyota Camry 2.2L. Installed the intake camshaft as well. I was ready to install the exhaust camshaft, but read online about the service bolt as well as in the manual, but the manual never stated why it was necessary. After further reading online it stated that the service bolt prevents the gears from unwinding and causing the cam to be out of time when removed. When I removed the camshafts I never placed a service bolt in the exhaust camshaft (should have now!). I never noticed the cam unwinding when I removed it from the cylinder head. I had the cylinder head and both cams to a machine shop for reconditioning. After carefully looking at the exhaust cam now I notice the do line up, but there is hole and something line a pin that are a off a bit out of alignment. Does the pin and hole have to line up? Looks like it would fit if the one gear was turned about 1/8 turn or so.
    Wondering if anyone here has and answer to this.
    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    So you can see what was to happen on dis-assembly:

    35. REMOVE CAMSHAFTS
    NOTICE: Since the thrust clearance of the camshaft is
    small, the camshaft must be kept level while it is being
    removed. If the camshaft is not kept level, the portion of
    the cylinder head receiving the shaft thrust may crack or
    be damaged, causing the camshaft to seize or break. To
    avoid this, the following steps should be carried out.

    A. Remove exhaust camshaft
    (a) Set the knock pin of the intake camshaft at 10–45°
    BTDC of camshaft position.
    HINT: The above angle allows No.2 and No.4 cylinder
    cam lobes of the exhaust camshaft to push their valve
    lifters evenly.

    (b) Secure the exhaust camshaft sub gear to drive gear
    with a service bolt.
    Recommended service bolt:
    Thread diameter6 mm
    Thread pitch 1.0 mm
    Bolt length 16–20 m m (0.63–0.79 in.)
    HINT: When removing the camshaft, make sure that
    the torsional spring force of the sub gear has been
    eliminated by the above operation.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    And on re-assembly:

    B. Install exhaust camshaft
    (a) Set the knock pin of the intake camshaft at 10–45°
    BTDC of camshaft angle.
    HINT: The above angle allows the No.2 and No.4
    cylinder cam lobes of the exhaust camshaft to push
    their valve lifters evenly.

    (b) Apply MP grease to the thrust portion of the cam–
    shaft.
    (c) Engage the exhaust camshaft gear to the intake cam–
    shaft gear by matching the timing marks on each gear.
    (d) Roll down the exhaust camshaft onto the bearing
    journals while engaging gears with each other.
    NOTICE: There are also assembly reference marks on
    each gear as shown in the Illustration. Do not use these
    marks.

    5. CHECK AND ADJUST VALVE CLEARANCE
    (See page EG1–12)
    Turn the camshaft and position the cam lobe upward,
    and check and adjust the valve clearance.
    Valve clearance (Cold):
    Intake
    0.19 – 0.29 mm (0.007 – 0.011 In.)
    Exhaust
    0.28 – 0.38 mm (0.011 – 0.015 In.)
    (e) Turn the intake camshaft clockwise or counterclockwise little
    by little until the exhaust camshaft sits in
    the bearing journals evenly without rocking the cam–
    shaft on the bearing journals.
    NOTICE: It is very important to replace the camshaft in
    the bearing journals evenly while tightening bearing caps
    in the subsequent steps.
    (f) Install the bearing caps in their proper locations.
    (g) Apply a light coat of engine oil on the threads and
    under the heads of the bearing cap bolts.
    (h) Install and uniformly tighten the 10 bearing cap bolts
    in several passes, in the sequence shown.
    Torque: 19 N–m (190 kgf–cm, 14 ft–lbf)

    (i) Remove the service bolt (B).

    5S–FE ENGINE – ENGINE MECHANICAL
    EG1–71
  • 96toycam96toycam Posts: 1
    I have a 1996 toyota Camry LE that had the timing belt and water pump changed in 2004 at 55K miles The car now has 80K miles and Goodyear auto is telling me it needs to be replaced again because it's old and if it breaks will eat the engine. This doesn't sound right to me. Can anyone help me out with this Thanks!
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Very low mileage vehicle.

    I wouldn't be replacing it w/35K miles on the new belt.

    I don't remember off the top of my head whether this is an interference engine or not (interference = if the timing belt breaks, the valves can get bent from the piston).
  • tgljtglj Posts: 1
    After starting my car, driving it approximately a mile..my 2001 LE started sounding like nuts and bolts were being tossed around, then started chugging along, soon sounded like the guts of it was going to drag on the ground. I pulled over. Parked and let it rest a few hours. This time when starting it, it still sounded nasty and ran the same. I was traveling from 2 states away so I had to chance it home (in the rain I might add). Approx 20 mins later, it died on the highway going 60mph. It was towed to a lot where the tow driver left my flashers on which I didn't realize until an hour later. The car won't totally start. I don't want to sound girlie (though thats what I am), but is the reason its not totally starting now, due to the lights that were left on and just needs a jump and new timing belt or could it be more? Also, I had a friend do a diagnostic on it. This is what it read:
    P0115 Engine Coolant Temp Circuit Malfunction
    P0340 Cam Shaft Position Sensor A-Bank 1 Circuit Malfunction
    P0401 EGR Flow Insufficient
    My friend noticed the coolant looks "dirty" and the level is at "just above the Low mark" and that my oil, (although I get timely changes) looked "not good" as well.
    Another friend thats going to work on my car said after he puts in a new belt, the rest will probably fall into place (besides the fluids of course)
    I haven't any family, am a single mom, and just have these couple friends to look to for automotive guidance but want to make sure I am doing what sounds right? I'm buying a new belt tomorrow and paying him 150-200.00 for his labor, Help? :confuse:
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    I don't believe the timing belt is 'necessarily' your problem.

    If the timing belt broke, the engine would stop immediately, it would not continue to run sluggishly.

    I would suspect a more serious engine problem, if it was sounding like nuts and bolts clanging around. What is the mileage on this engine?
  • I recently bought my aunts 2000 Camry le 6 cyl. She has babied his car and kept all records. It runs great but people keep suggesting to do preventive maintenance on it, namely: replace spark plugs, wires etc.. replace timing belts and water pump etc.... This is all because it is over 100 k miles. Is this really necessary if the car runs good? How long will a timing belt last? What about spark plugs? and water pump? note that the belt does not interfere with anything, so if it breaks it just falls off. Anyone with info on how long these items last please email me or write at w_steuwe@hotmail.com THANKS
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,619
    Well you can be proactive or reactive. If you are proactive you spend some money now and less later; if you are reactive, then you roll the dice regarding what ELSE is damaged when the part goes south, and also being stranded when it happens.

    If you're quite sure none of these items have been attended to since year 2000, they are certainly all due. Pay now or pay more later, is how I see it.

    Of course, if you plan to just ditch the car when something big breaks, then maybe just running 'er into the ground isn't a bad idea.

    MODERATOR

  • At first I was planning to just do it as preventive maintenance,but then the $2024 price tag to fix it all came up. I dont plan to run the car into the ground. But certainly 2000 dollars is too much to put into a 10 yr old car. What are the basics that i should definitely do? the problem is that it always comes up that while they are doing this they should go ahead and do that. Well thats what got me to the 2000 dollars.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,619
    Okay I see what you're saying. I'm sure you could get this work done for less, but besides all that, I'd at least do the spark plugs and wires, and if the coolant and brake system has never been flushed, do that. Also, service the automatic transmission if fluid and filter have never been done. Also check your belts and hoses for cracking and wear, check your battery cables for corrosion and if those are old tires have a good look at them as well.

    No saying how long a timing belt will last---being a Toyota, probably a long time.

    MODERATOR

  • THANKS I appreciate the help.
  • gfb2gfb2 Posts: 1
    I have a 1994toyota camry with 75K miles org. and the timing belt broke last night idleing and car died .Had it towed home and everone tells me that I will need a new engine. Is this always true?Thank you for your answers.
    Gerald Beveridge
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