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Saab 9-3 Coupe (2002 and earlier)

1171820222326

Comments

  • smu1976smu1976 Posts: 110
    Forbes April 29th issue, page 58

    Sticker price for a 9-3 $27,995.00
    Invoice price $26,339.00

    Holdback $859.00

    Factory to Dealer Cash $4000.00

    Dealer Cost $21,480

    These numbers make sense, for some of the post paying in the 24-25K range are still giving the dealer 2000-3500 profit on a unit.
    Of course the dealers never tell the consumer about the factory to dealer incentives. Saab is giving the Dealers a big plus on this unit now, in about 4-5 months when the new 9-3 starts popping up, thats when the customer will get some good breaks.
  • spider6spider6 Posts: 35
    Just to your price doesn't include $625 shipping charge, any package(options $1900 up to $2400+), automatic transmission $1200 ,$475 metallic paint, or any dealer fees...
    otherwise the number is correct but only to the extend of base only. I think it would be
    next to impossible for anyone to walk into a luxury label car dealer to find a Saab with no option. $24K-$25K is probably more like it with options after dealer heavy discount.
  • bkswardbksward Posts: 93
    Take the '05 percentages in the listing of 44% and 52%. Residual values of $14.5k for the MB, $12.3k for the Saab... So the total cost of depreciation would be $1200 less on the Saab...

    I think you tripped up slightly on your math. For the Saab, 44% of $24.5K is $10.8K, not $12.3K.

    $24.5K minus $10.8K means we've lost $13.7K. For the MB, 52% of $28K is $14.6K, and a loss of $13.4K. So the MB comes out slightly ahead.


    Nope, read my post again. 44% of $28k is $12.3... The $24.5k is the selling price on Cars Direct not MSRP. Therefore, my math is correct if the residuals are are based on MSRP...

    -Brian
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 7,106
    "And for those owners switching off Saab for some other car like Prelude; goodbye and happy motoring. Chances are, you don't live close to the mountains like I do. Chances are, you don't care if your car fails to breath properly (like a Saab Turbo does) at high altitude. See you at Pike's Peak or like altitudes maybe."

    I can't help but take that remark as somewhat of a personal attack. If you've followed this board, you'll see that I have had nothing but positive things to say about my Saab. I did buy my Saab because of the test drive I went on. I was also treated respectfully by the salesman. I love the versatility of the hatchback. The exhaust has a great note under hard acceleration. I love how the Turbo is so well engineered into the engine that it produces pretty much zero lag. My Base 9-3 never runs out of breath and always seems to be able to go faster. It is a rock solid highway cruiser. The seats are comfortable. The leather is very high quality. The steering is well weighted and communicative. The car handles well (except those damn stock tires pitch and howl way before the limits of the chassis). The heated seats are great. The AC Blows real cold and the car heats up relatively quick in the winter.

    When I bought my Saab, I needed a FWD (or AWD) car with a slushbox. I was trying (In late 1999) to decide between a Passat V6 or Accord EX-V6. I saw the nationally advertised lease deal for the Base 9-3s at the time and went for a test drive. It was a much better car to drive than the other 2, it was more expensive, and much cheaper to lease.

    I'm 26, live in New York City (read: not near the mountains like yourself) and don't need a 4 door car, so I opted to go for a Prelude which has been a car that I've wanted to own ever since 1992.

    2001 Honda Prelude Type SH/ 2011 BMW 328xi / 2011 Honda Pilot EX-L w/ Navigation

  • vigorousvigorous Posts: 15
    No worries. You have indeed spoken highly of your experience with the 9-3 and I'm glad for that. Edmunds too often acts as a trash board so I'm fighting back. If I sound surly, that's why. No personal offence intended.

    By the time you tire of the Prelude, wich is a spiffy, reputedly reliable car, the 9X or the 9-3X may be just what your needs then say you should have and you will return to Saab.

    These new 9s are exciting concept cars and Saab's announced five new entries in the ensuing five years should stir the autowriters, who on the whole have not been kind to the 900s or the 9-3s.

    I'm not a great fan of _ANY_ SUVs (except for large family or industrial use) so Saab can skip that entry as far as I'm concerned.
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 7,106
    I actually plan to keep the Prelude until I need another can and then keep it as a 3rd car. I'll definitely consider whatever the replacement is of the 9-3. I'm not a Saab Die Hard Fan, I haven't found a car to become brand loyal to. I'd definitely consider the 9-5 Wagon (Hopefully an Aero with a Stick) when the time comes that I need a Wagon. I'd rather have a sport Wagon than a minivan or SUV. No offense taken. Way too often people use the Edmunds boards for bashing. In the case of Jas28 & Huntzinger...they both have legitimate beefs with their respective Saabs.

    2001 Honda Prelude Type SH/ 2011 BMW 328xi / 2011 Honda Pilot EX-L w/ Navigation

  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    Saabnet.com has a great search engine. If you want, you can look it up for all the time it takes.

    Already done. Saabnet does not substantiate your claim. Now what?

    I don't accept the onus you put on me to look stuff up for you online.

    In other words, you're suggesting I do my homework first. I don't want to be rude and confrontational, but had you followed your own advice, you would have found that as I had mentioned, I had already done these archive searches posted the results in direct response to your post on the "9-3 vs. C230" ... a week ago.

    Now to resolve the actual question instead of arguing, what you said isn't archived on Saabnet. As such, could it be that you had mis-recalled the source and that it was something other than Saabnet?

    ------------

    Frankly, I don't care about resids because I bought the (discounted) Saab 9-3 after thorough research - as a keeper and not as a trader.

    That was my original intent too. Things change.

    -hh
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    Nope, read my post again. 44% of $28k is $12.3... The $24.5k is the selling price on Cars Direct not MSRP.

    Ah, you're right - I missed your part stating that the Saab's MSRP was also $28K. Sorry about that.

    Therefore, my math is correct if the residuals are are based on MSRP...

    Agreed. Now the only question is how the source actually did _their_ math! :-)

    -hh
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    I'm 26, live in New York City (read: not near the mountains like yourself)

    Oh, come on now! Its only a 40 hour drive out to Powder Creek Pass (the closest 8,000+ mt pass in the USA from where you live).

    -Hugh
  • vigorousvigorous Posts: 15
    ..hunter......and to pick up on something you said about there not being any data on the C230
    at Saabnet tending to confirm my one-word
    description - dull -, I went to the Saabnet
    board and entered "C230".

    There at least a dozen posts discussing this car.

    The most amusing one I found compared it to
    a Cimarron.

    Anyway, it isn't a hatch so it's out of order
    to discuss it here.
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    There at least a dozen posts discussing this car.

    14 that specifically mention the car in any context whatsoever. The number of hits that used "dull" or "ugly" with "C230" was exactly zero, plus there were some other derivative mentions on threads. There's clearly more on Edmunds than there.

    BTW, I found and read the Cimarron post. It made a good point, but the point was exclusively about marquee management and placement and nothing about looks.

    Insofar as the rest of the posts, yes, there were a few "its ugly" posts, but all new designs get a few of these. I don't think that there's ever been a hatchback made that's not had this remark made, particularly Saab hatchbacks. As such, a Saab owner complaining about the design trade-offs necessitated by a useful hatch is dangerously close to being a hypocrite remark IMHO.

    Anyway, it isn't a hatch so it's out of order
    to discuss it here.


    Excuse me? The "it" is the C230K Coupe, not the MB sedans. FWIW, this is a quite interesting remark to make in light of the 9-3 hatchback configuration having ceased production.

    -hh
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    I also bought the Saab because I have a dog. Another statistic you may wish to consider is a higher percentage of Saabers have dogs than any other kind of car.

    Does this mean that I should go out and get a dog? Ditto for my Saab neighbor across the street? Please also tell me what Designer Brand underwear I should be wearing too :-)

    Arf! Arf! 140 miles per hour+ top end (ungoverned) if you want and one of the fastest-accelerating cars from a running 30mph through 70mph reasonable money can buy.

    There's far, far more to driving than brainlessly pegging the pedal for a 1/4 mile straightway.

    For true performance driving, the biggest bang for the buck for over 99% of all US drivers today is not a bigger engine, better tires/wheels, or whatever: the biggest bang for the buck is a
    professional performance driving training course.

    Insofar as pure top end, perhaps you're in a region with the highway real estate and highway quality are such that its merely dangerous instead of insane to attempt even short sprints above 130mph. But that doesn't mean that your situation need apply to the rest of us. FWIW, how many hours of driving have you had at 130+? Or has it been just "5 second sprints" just to hit the speed, like the rest of us?

    -hh
  • vigorousvigorous Posts: 15
    LOL. You never quit, do you?


    You do not get to top end over 1/4 mile. I'm not a standing start kinda guy. Nobody should be except, pehhaps with a Viggen. I don't take the Saab to top end - ever. But if ever the highway hits me where this can be done as per Autobahn, then possibly I will, once.


    I do, however, have high altitude driving to do. Lots of it. It is quite a revelation on one particular stretch (highest point of land east of the Rockies on the TransCanada Highway) just which more expensive cars do not match the Saab on that upgrade, even at 70-80 mph.


    And what is there on the Prairies but long, straight, deserted (except in holiday season) highway?


    One of the most impressive (unpopulated) stretches of highway in the world lies between Lake Louise and Jasper, both in Canada's national park system and ALL at high altitude.


    If I had bought a Saab Viggen, which I didn't, then I would have taken the free driver training course purchasing a Viggen offered.


    My dog thinks I am a genius, even if you don't.


    I think the most telling comment from the Saab board on the C-merc was on obsolete technology - supercharging, even if Saab's new variable compression engine (30% better gas mileage with 30% less emissions at no loss of power) will require a supercharger.


    Daimler appears happier with Chrysler than it is with MB http://dw-world.de/english/0,3367,1431_A_507058_1_A,00.html

  • I'm trying to decide between the dark gray interior of a 9-3 hatchback vs. the tan. Opinions?
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    LOL. You never quit, do you?

    One of my nicknames has been "bulldog" for not letting go of a flailing BS'er. Yes, its a character flaw.

    I don't take the Saab to top end - ever.

    Then since its top end is irrelevant, then why did you bring it up?

    FWIW, the reason I'm picking on this is because I've found that people who brag about their vehicle's top end invariably are, to be polite, jerks.

    I do, however, have high altitude driving to do.

    And you've found a suitable solution. Congratulations. In contrast, there's not a road above 7,000ft within 30 hours driving from where I am, and TC'ing always means higher maintenance costs. Kinda means that its a trade-off that is best determined based on one's individual needs and criteria, doesn't it?

    I think the most telling comment from the Saab board on the C-merc was on obsolete technology - supercharging, even if Saab's new variable compression engine (30% better gas mileage with 30% less emissions at no loss of power) will require a supercharger.

    And upon whose grand authority was this pronouncement made?

    Free advice is worth what you paid for it, and Turbocharging and Superchargers both have their place, as you noted above. What people do not realize is that there really is no such thing as an "obsolete technology": there is only that which is the appropriate tool for the job. Sometimes the old way is still the best way. Case in point: there's a major component that's a 100+ year old technology in both of our automobiles right now. Care to guess what it is?

    -hh
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 7,106
    So I picked up my new Prelude on Saturday and drove around aimlessly for a few hours and then parked it in the driveway. Everything is in the complete opposite place of where it is on my 9-3. Thye window switches are on the door panel, the sunroof switch is to the left of the steering wheel...I've got to get used to this Honda after driving a Saab for 2+ years.

    stressdoc: I've got the Charcoal Grey in my 2000 9-3. It has kept very well (especially since I don't baby my leased cars). It doesn't show much dirt. But I've always been partial to dark interiors. What exterior color are you thinking of?

    2001 Honda Prelude Type SH/ 2011 BMW 328xi / 2011 Honda Pilot EX-L w/ Navigation

  • hppypaulhppypaul Posts: 43
    nyccarguy,

    with all the whining these saab owners do about all the problems, the one thing they can't complain about is control layout. I have 9-3 and it's the best I've ever had. everything is in the right place for me. don't think I could ever go back to a japanese car (they put everything wrong).
  • huntzingerhuntzinger Posts: 350
    with all the whining these saab owners do about all the problems, the one thing they can't complain about is control layout.

    We'll always find something to complain about :-)

    Personally, I find that I get used to the basics pretty quickly; the biggest problem I have is switching between cars. For example, over the past 3 months, the cars in our driveway have had their ignition switches located in the:

    - transmission housing between seats
    - steering column (right side)
    - dashboard (left side)
    - dashboard (right side)

    Of these, the dash/left is the one that messes me up the most, as need you have to have your keys in your left hand on this one, but not for the rest.

    Insofar as the rest of the items, I find the instrumentation layout to be more important to me, particularly how it is illuminated at night. The Saab did well in this regards, except that when you had the "Black Panel" enabled and turned on the high beams, the blue indicator light was a bit on the strong side in my judgement, probably because its a single-mode light.

    -hh
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 7,106
    I did really get used to the control layout of the Saab.

    Huntzinger: YOu're right about that Blue high beam light being way too bright when the night panel feature is activated.

    hppypaul: The Japanese manufacturers put controls where people expect them to be, while Saab puts them where everything is easier for the driver. In my Saab, I can close all 4 windows and the sunroof at the same time with one hand. After driving my Saab (when I first got it), I often found myself asking "why don't other manufacturers do things like this?"

    2001 Honda Prelude Type SH/ 2011 BMW 328xi / 2011 Honda Pilot EX-L w/ Navigation

  • jhberry4jhberry4 Posts: 11
    Looks at the new saab 9-3.

    www.saabzone.com
This discussion has been closed.